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 PLEASE NOTE: Due to our summer schedule, the next issue of the SKC will be dated September 2.


Aug. 12, 2018

 

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Prayer and Action; Totus Tuus; Janee Bernal; Diana Ramirez; Heidy Ramirez; Bishop Gilmore honored for 20 years ministry; suicide; contraception and abortion; Dead Sea Scrolls; Humanae Vitae; certification in youth ministry; Chuck Weber; Cathedral rectory chapel; Sister Viola Heichelbech; Adam Urban

 

     

St. Nicholas School, Kinsley, Advent Cantata, Dec. 7, 2008

 

 

 

 

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Fossil hunting reveals the creative artistry of God

Editor’s Note: The following is part of the special “Retirement and Senior Living” coverage in the May 6, 2018 SKC.

By Dave Myers
Southwest Kansas Catholic

I’ve always had a fascination with fossils, and my dad, being a retired geophysicist, has a keen interest in them as well — and far more knowledge. So, when my mom and dad came to visit my wife and me in Spearville several years ago, I decided to take Dad on a fossil hunt.

But where can we find them? I was still pretty new to Kansas.

We went to the Dodge City Visitor’s Center, where an attendant put in a call to Marshall Allen Bailey, whom she mistakenly told we were looking for “arrowheads”.

“No!” I whispered to her, imagining what Marshall Bailey’s response would be to us digging up indigenous artifacts. I was too late. She gave us a mischievous look and said into the phone, “I’m not going to tell them that.”

When we finally got it straight, my dad and I were directed to some land where the owner graciously allowed us to scour around. Within an hour or so, we found a rock the size of a beach ball covered in shell fossils. I lugged it back to the car, praying that I wouldn’t get a hernia, and for the next several years it sat near my parents’ front porch in Colorado, Dad often telling people about our discovery on the Kansas prairie.

For me, fossils are like God’s stocking-stuffers. They are little gifts God gives us to decipher the past. We thought we knew the mind of God — that the earth was the center of the universe — until the day that we discovered that the earth revolves around the sun, not the other way around.

And that mass of bone-shaped sediment? It actually forms into a behemoth creature that lived not thousands, but millions of years ago.

As noted scientist Jorge Mario Bergoglio (AKA Pope Francis) would attest, fossils don’t challenge the belief in a loving God, they enhance it! What a creative artist our God is!

Several months after my dad and I walked the Kansas countryside looking for fossils, I decided to do some yard work. (Normally, I don’t decide such things. It’s decided for me.) My job was to prepare a flower garden, and to line it with stones I found in the yard.

I turned over a narrow piece of stone and noticed a shell fossil! And then another! And later, we would go for walks and I would see fossils on stones on other yards! Having grown up in Colorado where fossil hunting meant a trip deep into the mountains, who could have guessed I’d find fossils right in my front yard!

As many of you already know, shell fossils are abundant due to the prevalence of sandstone in the area. This makes sense. Where do you find shells? On the beach! What are beaches made of? Sand! 

Most of these fossils are around 330 million years old, which would be the late Paleozoic era. This was before the advent of the dinosaurs. It was the time that much of the carbon was created that became the coal deposits of today. (“Shell Oil”, anyone?)

It also indicates that if we were to suddenly go back 330 million years, we’d all better be wearing flippers and a snorkel. This area would have been a tropical marine environment, comparable to the Bahamas or the Great Barrier Reef.

All sorts of cool fossils are waiting to be discovered in Kansas, and not just shells, bugs, plants and things. Plesiosaurs have been discovered, as have mosasaurs, 50-foot long marine reptiles. Mastodon and Woolly Mammoth teeth have been found in Kansas.

Personally, I think God smiles when we find clues to His creative past! Whether they are found by a scientist out in the field, a son and his father walking the plains of Kansas, or a grandparent leading his or her grandchild through a front yard nature walk.

God’s pallet is filled with wonders waiting to be discovered.

 

Did the priest who would serve in Ellinwood, Liebenthal, and Great Bend, also act as a spiritual advisor to hoodlums?  It’s apparent that Father Phillip Coughlan lent aid to notorious outlaws such as Baby Face Nelson and John Dillinger — and at least knew personally, if not helped, others such as Ma Barker and Legs Diamond. He even was asked by the lesser known, but highly successful bank robber Eddie Bentz to help him and his wife adopt a child. But whether or not the aid that Father Coughlan offered was outside his purview as a priest — and perhaps even outside the law at times — has not been determined.

 Little did SW Kansas Catholics know that their pastor was known as a

‘Spiritual advisor to hoodlums’

 The following is reprinted with permission from babyfacenelsonjournal.com.

The website from which the following came presents this story in chapters. The following chapter contains information on Father Phillip Coughlan, who served in SW Kansas. The story took place in November, 1934. The chapter begins just after a special agent and an investigator are killed in a chase. “Helen” is Baby Face Nelson’s wife, and “Chase” is his good friend:

 NELSON MANAGED TO GET BACK TO THE AGENT’S CAR and drive it around to the rear of his disabled Ford. Chase, little more than a spectator in the final minutes of the battle, began gathering their weapons when he saw Nelson driving toward him and calling for Helen.

As Chase approached the Hudson, Nelson looked at him and said, “Drop everything and get me to the priest.” Chase said he’d get their personal belongings from the disabled car, but Nelson said “Forget that stuff. You’ll have to drive. I’ve been hit pretty bad.” He then called for Helen again.

Chase leaned in and helped Nelson move to the passenger side. He testified that Nelson’s left pant leg was soaked in blood from mid-thigh to his ankle. As Chase got behind the wheel, he asked, “Where is she?” referring to Helen. Nelson shook his head, “We’ll have to catch her later,” and then again asked to be taken to the priest.

 Just as Chase began to pull away, however, he saw Helen in the rearview mirror running toward them. She jumped into the rear seat, and Chase headed west toward Fox River Grove. As Helen cradled her husband’s head, he looked at her and said, “I’m done for.”

 As the early evening wind whistled through the Hudson’s bullet-pierced windshield, fear and confusion reigned inside the vehicle. Chase testified he was speeding along unfamiliar roads, at times hitting 85 mph, trying to figure out where he was. A weeping Helen continued to hold Nelson’s head as he took long, deep breaths and attempted to direct Chase down one road after another, through one small town after another.

 They finally entered Wilmette and made their way to 1155 Mohawk Road, the home of Father Phillip Coughlan’s sister. Both Nelson and his wife were raised Catholic, and Father Coughlan was an old family friend. It would eventually come out that Father Coughlan had met with Nelson, bankrobber Tommy Carroll and others many times over the years, but he always denied any knowledge of their actions.

It was just before 5 p.m. when the family maid notified Father Coughlan, who was in the house, that a woman was at the back door and needed to see him immediately. The priest went to the door said saw Helen.

“Jimmie’s been shot. You have to help us. He’s in the car,” she said.

Meanwhile, Chase had pulled the car. When Helen and the priest went into the garage, Chase was holding Nelson up, and they were at the back of the vehicle. When Nelson saw the priest, he muttered “Hello” and then slumped back against Chase.

Helen pleaded with the priest to give her husband refuge, but the priest refused, noting it was his sister’s house; her 8-year-old son was inside, and she was expecting several guests that evening. Chase later testified Helen began to cry. “But he’s dying. He’s got to get someplace where he can lay down.”

The priest said he knew of a safe location he could bring them to, but later told police he didn’t know of any place. He just wanted to get them away from his sister’s house.

Helen suggested they all go in the priest’s car, but Father Coughlan said it would be better if they followed him since they couldn’t leave the agent’s bullet-ridden and blood-stained car there. “Follow me in your car,” he said. “We won’t go far.” When Chase became suspicious and questioned the priest, he was assured by Father Coughlan that he meant to help them.

 The priest helped Chase put Nelson back into the front passenger seat and Helen into the back. They then followed Father Coughlan for several blocks until the priest saw Chase make a sudden U-turn and speed away. The priest said he attempted to follow them but soon lost them in traffic. He would later admit he was relieved, but also saddened because they might have feared “I was leading them into a trap.”

And that’s exactly what both Chase and Helen would later tell police that Nelson feared. He told Chase, “I don’t like the way he’s acting. He seems wrong. Lose him.”

Nelson, it seemed, knew of a safe place, and began directing Chase down one road after another, eventually leading them out of Wilmette and into Winnetka and finally down a back alley and into a red two-stall garage in the rear of a gray stucco cottage facing Walnut Street. Chase would later testify he had never been to the house and didn’t know where he was, but that Nelson assured him “friends” were inside.

Chase knocked on the front door and “a tall dark-complexioned man in his late 30s answered.” Chase said “There’s someone out here who needs you,” and led the man to the garage.  Chase said once he looked into the car “he instantly recognized Jimmie.”

The two men and Helen then carried Nelson into the house. Chase said they entered by a side door and walked through a kitchen and down a hallway and turned left into a small bedroom where Nelson was placed on a large white iron bed. Chase said there was a young woman and an old man in his 60s in the house but neither said anything or tried to help. Once on the bed, the younger man left.

“All three of us knew Les [Baby Face Nelson’s real name was Lester Joseph Gillis] was dying, but there was nothing we could do,” Helen told officials several days later. Given scissors and other supplies, Helen cut off all of Nelson’s clothing, later telling authorizes that his white shirt was mostly crimson. She stuffed cotton into the bullet hole in his stomach and into the large exit wound in his back. She then covered both wounds by wrapping his waist with a long strip of cloth torn from the bed sheet. Finally, she cleaned the buckshot wounds on his legs and then wrapped him in a blanket when he complained of being cold.

“That’s better,” he said to her and then told them the pain was gone but there was a spreading numbness. Helen simply held his hand and waited for the end.

 

 

 

Cimarron couple seeks child to share home, family, unconditional love

By Dave Myers
Southwest Kansas Catholic

Editor’s Note: The following is part of a continuing series on local couples seeking to adopt through the Catholic Charities of SW Kansas Adoption Program. If you would like to see a video/slideshow about the Staats, go to http://catholiccharitiesswks.org/services/adoption/our-waiting-families.

   Their eyes met from across the crowded room and suddenly time stood still. The boy and the girl approached each other slowly, perhaps a bit apprehensively, guided by divine providence toward what they couldn’t know then was a destiny designed by God.

Well, that’s not … entirely accurate. I mean, this was preschool after all, and it would be a few years before the youngsters even entered the Kootie stage, much less recognized any sort of future destiny.

Kallie and Rodney Staats of Cimarron are among those rare married couples who can say they’ve known each other since they could barely form sentences. And today, in their home just blocks from where they were reared, the couple are working through Catholic Charities of SW Kansas Adoption Program to begin a family.

“One private adoption company wanted $30,000,” said Kallie, who works for United Telecommunications. “Catholic Charities was better, more economical. I also like that it’s non-profit. Nobody should get rich off a child.”

The pair approached Catholic Charities two years ago, where adoption social worker Lori Titsworth guided them through the intensive process of preparation for becoming adoptive parents. It doesn’t cost $30,000, but it’s not cheap.

“It is cheap!” countered Rodney, a diesel mechanic. “That’s not the right word. I should say ‘economical’. It’s based on your income. If someone doesn’t make a lot of money, they can still adopt.”

 By August of last year — after an extensive review and education process — the couple placed their video/slideshow onto the Catholic Charities website (http://catholiccharitiesswks.org/services/adoption/our-waiting-families), introducing themselves to birth parents who may be considering the adoption process.

There you learn that Kallie and Rodney were friends all through school; they didn’t fall in love until after each had graduated from college. Before then, they’d spent those freedom-filled days of childhood and youth hanging out together from time to time, cruising Main Street with mutual friends, never knowing that their futures were tied inexorably together.

On June 4, the couple will celebrate 13 years of marriage – among which have been times of great joy and great heartbreak. 

A few years ago, the two became foster parents to two young children, a boy and a girl, belonging to a relative.

“We went from childless to parents of two in 24 hours,” Kallie said. “It was the hardest most difficult time of our lives, but it was also the best. It was a mental roller coaster.”

After two years, the birth parents petitioned to have their children returned, and the courts decided in their favor. It’s not difficult to imagine the sadness Kallie and Rodney endured.

“When they took them away, that was heartbreaking,” Rodney said softly. “It was God’s will. The good Lord was preparing us for something else.”

Last year, Rodney was offered the chance to spend a mission trip in Rwanda with a ministry started by his sister Kendra Willard and her husband, Ruben, called, “Lift Them Up.”

“We had prayer meetings; we talked with the children,” Rodney explained of his time in Rwanda. “They like to touch. The men there don’t have hair on their arms, and some of them have never seen a white person. So, there was me and Ruben, two hairy white guys.

“I can’t believe as poor as they are, how happy and content they are,” Rodney added. “They show love for everyone. And they’re forgiving. The people who killed their families are now getting out of jail – people who lived right next door – and they’re forgiving them.”

The wait for an adoptive child requires two things: 1) patience and 2) more patience. As the couple looks forward to the day when God leads a child to their door, Kallie looks back on those two years as a foster mom as a mirror for what is to come.

“It’s the unconditional love — those hugs and smiles and kisses for no reason at all, and the conversations with children — that I look forward to. You never know what they will say. You may have a bad day, and they can bring you right back up.”

“I’m going to enjoy teaching them things,” said Rodney, his grease-stained coveralls and the machine shop, wood shop and a large garden on their surrounding property paying testimony to a man who is expert at making things work.

“And spoiling them,” he added. “We look forward to loving whoever God brings to us.”

 

If you would like more information about the Staats, see their personal profile at http://catholiccharitiesswks.org/services/adoption/our-waiting-families. You can also contact Amy Falcon at 620-227-1590, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or Lori Titsworth at 620-729-1393, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Father Murphy honored for 65 years of ministry

By TIM WENZL and DAVE MYERS

At the March 22 Chrism Mass, Father Ultan Murphy was celebrated for 65 years of service as a priest.

At the reception to follow, he told those gathered that prior to he and the other Irish transplants first making their way out to the newly formed Catholic Diocese of Dodge City, he was told how beautiful it was on the prairies of Southwest Kansas: expansive fields of grain wafting like waves in the wind; fields of cattle paying tribute to the economy of the region; and good farm folk eager for the Good Word.

“When we arrived in Dodge City there was this massive cloud of dust. I turned to the others and said, ‘What the hell have we gotten ourselves into?’”

The large crowd erupted into laughter.

In 2014, Father Murphy, then 87, retired after 33 years as pastor of St. Ann’s Parish in Olmitz. At the time of his retirement, he had the distinction of being the oldest active Catholic pastor in the state of Kansas.

Father Murphy was appointed pastor at Olmitz and Holy Trinity, Timken, in 1980. He served both parishes for 23 years until he announced his retirement earlier in 2003. He reconsidered, and his responsibilities were reduced to the Olmitz parish at that time. His official title also changed to “parochial administrator.”

“I’ll do what I do now,” Father Murphy said in 2014, “Say Mass every day, visit the sick, just fill in if I’m needed. They’re not going to miss me. No, I’ll be here; I’ll be around. I don’t go home to Ireland any more. My nieces and nephews come over here every few years. No need for me to go. With communication now, it’s just like being there — almost.

“After having served these people, I can say without any reservations, they’re just good people. All solid people, many from Eastern Europe, who brought the faith with them and kept the faith and are doing their best to pass that on to their children, grandchildren and great grandchildren. I’ve seen it in all of my 33 years.”

When asked about his happiest memories, Father Murphy responded: “The happiest part of my ministry has been many converts – marriages – getting people back to the Church. I’ll probably miss visiting the kids in the classroom on Sunday morning. That was one of my better things to do.”

Father Murphy resigned the pastorate at Olmitz with this simple advice to the parishioners, “Stay the course and believe in God and say your prayers. Take your children to Mass and make sure your children go to religion class.”

Father Murphy was ordained June 7, 1953, by The Most Reverend John Staunton, bishop of Ferns, at St. Peter’s Seminary, Wexford, Ireland. He was recruited for the Diocese of Wichita, but was transferred to the Diocese of Dodge City by agreement of Bishop Mark K. Carroll and Bishop John B. Franz. He has served under all six of the bishops who have shepherded the Diocese of Dodge City.

Father Murphy’s assignments include: assistant pastor at St. John, Hoisington, (two terms); and St. Rose of Lima, Great Bend; and pastor at St. Mary’s Loretto; St. John’s, Kiowa; St. John, St. John, and St. Francis, Seward; Holy Rosary, Medicine Lodge, and St. John’s, Kiowa, all prior to his appointment at Olmitz and Timken.

Father Anselm Eke, MSP, resident pastor at St. John the Evangelist, Hoisington, was assigned to the additional pastorate at St. Ann’s, Olmitz.

 

When the diocese divided, priests’ parishes left to the luck of the draw

   During a 2010 visit to the Priests Retirement Center, Irish priest Father Eugene Kenny, explained how the newly ordained were divided between the dioceses. “They did that at the dining hall of the rectory of the (Wichita) cathedral. I remember that room, all right. There were eight of us.

     We met Bishop Carroll and picked cards out of a biretta. Some say it was the biretta of Archbishop Strecker, who was chancellor at the time. The cards said either Bishop of Wichita or Bishop of Dodge City. The four who drew Dodge City were Father (Ultan) Murphy, Father (Andrew) McGovern, myself, and Father Kieran Murray.

“(Msgr.) Pat Leahy, God love him, and (Msgr.) John Cody arrived and took us to Dodge City, and we met Bishop (John B.) Franz … and that’s the way it was. I still have the card I drew out of the hat.”

Father Kenny then opened a file, pulled out a card with well-worn corners. “It is very simple, just a postcard. It defined the destiny of a young man,” he said with a hearty laugh.

 

 

 

 

 

 

It takes a community

Colorado woman creates a place of refuge

Dave Myers
Southwest Kansas Catholic

LAKEWOOD, COLO. “Last night I had a bad dream about the Taliban attacking,” said an Afghani youth as he sat at a kitchen table in a large, white farmhouse.

   Behind the house, a tract of farm land juts up against a long apartment complex. It’s an area where the urban landscape literally meets the rural countryside.

    A couple of horses romp nearby. Roosters crow in the distance.

Sitting beside “Asghar” at the table, is his friend, Pamir, as well as Renata Heberton, founder of what dozens of child refugees and formerly homeless Americans know as Angelica Village.

While still in her 20s, the 33-year-old purchased a duplex where she began fostering children. Today, she oversees five living spaces — including houses and apartments — where formerly homeless families live and thrive in community.

“A friend and I bought this house for the ‘Unaccompanied Refugee Minors’,” Heberton said of the large, white house. The term indicates a status which the youth fall under as refugees.

 “We hosted a ‘GoFundMe’ site [a free internet fundraising platform] for the down payment on the house,” said Heberton, who has a master’s degree in social work. “We raised $30,000 in 10 days. We had incredible support.

“We’re a licensed foster home.”

Asghar lives in Michigan where he is a high school senior. When the Catholic visited, he was in Colorado on Spring Break visiting his friend, Pamir. On April 27, he will have been in the United States two years.

Along with his two brothers and mother, Asghar escaped the grasp of the Taliban and made it to Pakistan. But peace was illusive. The Taliban made its presence known there, too.

 Under the status, “Unaccompanied Refugee Minors,” Asghar was able to escape to the United States with the help of Bethany Christian Services and the support of the UNHCR (United Nations High Commissioner of Refugees — a UN refugee agency). It was in Pakistan where he met his friend sitting next to him in the Colorado kitchen.

“It’s a very different country than what I expected,” Asghar said of his new home in the United States. “The hardest part has been learning English,” and getting used to American cuisine, he added with a laugh.

With the bad dream from the previous night echoing in his head, he said, “Here it is safe. You can work. You can go anywhere you want. The people are nice. They are very kind.”

The soft-spoken Pamir, 17, who like many of the other youth in Angelica Village was sponsored by Lutheran Family Services, escaped Afghanistan with his family to Pakistan when he was “too young to remember.” The teen has only been in the United States four-and-a-half months, and is still getting used to a range of allergies he has suffered.

Abel, another youth — a teenager from Uganda by-way-of the Congo — yawned as he entered the kitchen and began fixing breakfast. The 10 youth living at the home are all on spring break, Heberton said, which is why they were lumbering sleepily into the kitchen at 10 a.m. instead of being off at school.

“When I came here, it was very exciting,” the tall, 19-year-old said. “I’m happy here. It’s better education, better work. In Africa it was hard to get an education. There was not enough money for education. I cannot go to school. That’s one of the reasons why I wanted to come here. You can get everything you want with help, or on your own.”

As he spoke, a diminutive girl appeared in the kitchen doorway.  She is Jeta, Abel’s older sister. The two, along with their brother, have lived in the home for approximately two years.

When asked, she said she misses her homeland. One can almost feel her heartache for the home she was forced to leave behind.

“I love Africa. Africa is my favorite dream, which I will never forget.”

Other youth living in the home (or who have lived there in the past) include kids from Guatemala, Honduras, and Columbia. She also has fostered youth from Denver, and Native Americans from the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota and from the Navajo Reservation in the Four Corners region.

Like a typical parent, Heberton helps the youth to discover their path in life, encourages them when it’s time to get a job, and urges them to think about college.

As the interview continued, a truck pulled up to the house with a delivery of fertilizer for a large garden the household maintains.

Heberton hopes to form a community garden one day for all of Angelica Village. In fact, it’s Heberton’s dream that Angelica Village will one day be as closely knit physically — a real village — as the members are spiritually and emotionally.

“We build relationships,” Heberton said. “One of the biggest injustices in the world is when people are not connected in their community. Community allows people to thrive and discover their potential.”

She has help in her amazing endeavor to serve the homeless and the young refugees. Though spread out across a large neighborhood, with members from several countries and cultures, residents of Angelica Village represent one community.

This is at the heart and soul of Heberton’s mission. In fact, she hopes to one day form a “creative art and music space,” a “therapeutic center” for the arts and physical therapies, such as massage, as well as a community corner store providing staples for families and youth in transition.

And she hopes to one day be able to open her doors to those with physical and intellectual disabilities.

As their mission statement reads, “Through love, care, and sustained mutual support, Angelica Village nurtures conscious community living spaces where people with special abilities, families seeking refuge from war and violence, individuals and families experiencing homelessness, and fellow community partners receive what they need and share what they can.”

 For more information, including a list of needed items to donate, visit angelicavillage.org.

March 19, 2018

Solemnity of St. Joseph, Spouse of the Blessed Virgin Mary

 

Dear Worthy Grand Knights:

This month we join you, our brother Knights and families, in observing the 135th anniversary of the founding of the Knights of Columbus on March 29. This Founder’s Day is a wonderful opportunity for all of us to rededicate ourselves to our Order’s principles of Charity, Unity, Fraternity and Patriotism, and to continue to seek to form our good works in the spirit of Knights of Columbus founder, the Venerable Servant of God Father Michael J. McGivney.

We are writing to you with a special appeal, one that we believe would be dear to Father McGivney’s priestly heart and thus to his Knights. We seek your support for a statewide effort called the Protect Adoption Choice campaign.

 The Kansas Legislature is currently considering the “Adoption Protection Act,” legislation that would protect faith-based adoption providers like Catholic Charities from unjust litigation and government action (the House version is HB 2687 and the Senate version is SB 401).  There have been situations in other states where government agencies have forced Catholic Charities to shut down their adoption ministry because they will only place children in homes with a married mother and father. The Adoption Protection Act would proactively ensure that this will not happen in Kansas. This legislation simply allows faith-based child placement agencies to continue to operate according to their religious principles.  The bill does not infringe upon anyone’s legal right to adopt children; it simply affirms that faith-based agencies cannot be punished for adhering to their religious beliefs in their adoption ministries.

We are calling upon you, your spouses, the voting-age members of your family, and all brother Knights to get involved in the Protect Adoption Choice campaign now before the regular session of the Kansas Legislature ends on April 6. Failure to take action on this important issue could one day result in the closure of faith-based adoption agencies like Catholic Charities.

Please contact your state representative and senator as soon as possible. The following is a sample of what you might say:


 “Hello, my name is ___________ and I am a registered voter from ___________ . I respectfully ask you to support the ‘Adoption Protection Act’ (HB 2687 in the House and SB 401 in the Senate). This legislation ensures that faith-based adoption providers like Catholic Charities will continue to be free to serve children and families.  Catholic Charities’ adoption ministry has been forced to close in other states because of groups and government agencies hostile to our Catholic beliefs. Catholic Charities and other faith-based adoption providers should be free to serve the common good as they have for so long.  This legislation does not affect anyone’ legal right to adopt, it just protects groups like Catholic Charities.  Birthmothers and adoptive parents who want to use a faith-based provider should be free to do so. As your constituent, this legislation is very important to me. Thank you.”

 

To learn more, please visit www.ProtectAdoptionChoice.org where you can directly email your state senator and representative.  To find the phone number of your state legislator, please visit http://www.kslegislature.org/ or https://openstates.org/. Those without internet access can call Legislative Administrative Services at 785-296-2391 to be connected to their legislators.

Let us join efforts as members of the largest Catholic family fraternal service organization to defend the religious freedoms we value so dearly. We place this effort under St. Joseph’s care and pray for its success through the intercession of Father McGivney.

 

Vivat Jesus!

 

Most Reverend Joseph F. Naumann
Archbishop of Kansas City in Kansas
 
Most Reverend John B. Brungardt
Bishop of Dodge City
 
Most Reverend Carl A. Kemme
Bishop of Wichita
 
Very Reverend Francis E. Coady
Diocesan Administrator – Diocese of Salina

Past Issues

July 15, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Immigration Protest/Rally; Faith and Light Fiesta; Seeing the Dead Sea Scrolls; Corpus Christi procession; Prayers for priests; Sisters turn 100; Michael Brungardt; Gerald Vincke; Massacre in San Salvador; Action for Alex 

 

June 3, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Parish Pray for Priestly Vocations; Appeal reaches $10 million; Gangs; Seminarians; Pam Willis; Why I like being a priest; Happy Father's Day; Patricia Lujan; Tyler and Rachel Bennett; Adoption Protection Act.

May 20, 2018
KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Track meet; Beloved Sinners; Benjamin Martin retires; Smiles; Future of Fortune Telling; Hoisington mission; DofI; Getting Equipped; Spring Social; First Communion; Confirmation
KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Track meet; Beloved Sinners; Benjamin Martin retires; Smiles; Future of Fortune Telling; Hoisington mission; DofI; Getting Equipped; Spring Social; First Communion; Confirmation

May 6, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Archbishop Romero; Seeing, Touching, Tasting; Exhortation; Father Patrick Conroy; Happy Mother's Day; A child on your doorstep; Vibrant Ministries Grant; From the heart of a young father; Love Gives Life; Roman Holiday; Smartphone; retirement
Fossil Hunting

 

April 15, 2018

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Easter Vigil; Angelica Village; Colorado woman; The art of anger; Cimarron Couple; Staats; Adoption; 

Father Ultan Murphy anniversary; Coughlan; Spiritual Advisor to Hoodlums; Woman of Courage; Oration contest; Darcy Feist  

 

April 1, 2018

 

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Defending Adoption; Led by the Spirit; Knights; ABC Pregnancy Center;
Memorial of Mary; Homeless; Relics; Down syndrome abortion; Chrism Mass

 

March 18, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: SKYAC; Aleksandr Men; Fasting for Priestly Vocations; Uganda; School for deaf; Rannah Evetts; Oberle; Rachel and Doug Trombley; Oscar Romero; Paul VI; DACA

 

 

March 4, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Fasting for priestly vocations; Father Juan; Fasting and prayer;
Quest Weekend 2018; DACA; With God, anything is possible; Homelessness in our communities; Rhubarb, Kansas;
What's the point of fasting; Rite of Election; same-sex couples

 

Feb. 18, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Catholic Schools Week; Rachel Doll; Ellinwood; Great Bend; Garden City; Ness City; Dodge City; Sister Rita Schwarzenberger; Nigeria; Bishop Hermes; Fasting for Priestly Vocations; World Day for Consecrated Life; 50th Anniversary St. Dominic School; What will life be like in 50 years?

 

 

Feb. 4, 2018

 

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: March for Life; Tracy and Ross Smith; Adoption; Vibrant Ministries; Faith and Light;
Pro-Life; Mortal sin to discard elderly; DACA; Abortion; Dreamers; Human Trafficking

 

Jan. 21, 2018

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Louise Korbe; Anne Frank; Miep Gies; Home Heat; Father Solanus

 

Jan. 7, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Good news and kingdom living; dreamers; Sister Teresa Orozco; Infant Adoption; Elderly; a moral conundrum; seminarian; feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe

 

Dec. 17, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Celebrate Christmas 'unplugged'; Msgr. Matthew Smith; Klan; Catholic Charities Annual Appeal; Fr. Larry Rosebaugh; A Guadalupe Encounter; Laci and Joe Salazar; A Christmas Wish; Adoption; Confession; Advent; EWTN; Christmas Blues; Tilma; Pittsburgh; PSR

 

Dec. 3, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: 2017 NCYC; Wheel of Balance; Marita Rother; Stanley Rother; slavery; trafficking; Windthorst water damage; martyred priests; confession; reconciliation; How to go to confession; recipe for codfish cakes; Catholic schools; appeal

 

Nov. 19, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Saints; Father Kola; Black Elk; Giving Tuesday; velvet Elvis; a Slice of Time; Dani Sandoval; Mexican Village; Father Tim Hickey; New faces at chancery; priests share thoughts on confession; Wheel of Balance

 

Nov. 5, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Matrimony Anniversary Mass, 2017; Riebel; Faith and Light; Scripture Day; Sex in the Bible; Quilt, Mexican Village Story; Finance; Fatima pilgrimage; Fowler church window renovation; Medicare; Crazy Glue


Oct. 15, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Father Francis Jordan; Sister Renee Kirmer; Father Rother beatified; religious liberty; RCIA Kansas; V Encuentro; Bishop Weisenburger; Daughters of Isabella; Bishop Gerber Science Center


Oct. 1, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: De Colores; Rebein; Dreamer; Pies; Kellner; Code Quilts; Sister Crucita; Feezor; Formed.org; Sin and pain

 

 Sept. 17, 2017

 

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Sister Lucy Fidelis; Underground Railroad; Sister Irene Hartman; DACA; new priests; teachers; Volunteer of the Year; Golf Classic; St. Francis Xavier; St. Nicholas Parish Center, Kinsley; seminarians; Knights Lite; Stewardship Day 2017

Sept. 3, 2017

Aug. 13, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Coronado Cross; Masada; Moody Gardens; Elders; Rother; undocumented children; cages; year of mercy; Kumi; Hollywood makeup artist; New Mexico; refugee women.

July 16, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Summer camp; tithing and almsgiving; Bill Baalmann; Nathan Schaller; Jubilarian Sisters; Sister Hortencia Rodriguez; Sister Petrona Stockemer; Sister Denise Sevart; Convocation of Catholic Leaders; Mother talks about her son entering seminary; Arcoiris; Youth group travels to Colorado Springs; Major Phillip Roth

June 11, 2017 (Updated)

Ordination; Mark Brantley; Jacob Schneider; Father's Day; Thanks, Dad!; Appeal; Sister Mary Martin Weaver; Bishop Maralit; Budget; Trafficked women; Deacon Michael Brungardt; Dead Sea Scrolls; softball; Father Urban retirement; Sister Kravec retirement; Father Mazouch retirement; Authentic Joy; Pris Climate Accord; Jack Schramm; Pieta.

May 28, 2017 (Updated)

 

Grateful Hearts; MSFS Provincial; Reddy; Reif; Opossum; Dead Sea Scrolls; Our Lady of Fatima; Jorge Herrera, Jr.; Cursillo; Kough; First Communion; Confirmation

May 14, 2017

Esteban Hernandez; citizen; Lilly Ann Rein, Amberly Jimenez, Mother's Day; peacock; Quattrocchi; President Kennedy; Teen Moms; Junior High Youth Rally; Encounter With God's Call; granny/nanny; seniors' contributions; tornado anniversary; harvest; healthcare; Mr. Brown; Store-bought teeth; Louis and Zelie Martin; Father John Sullivan; Irish priest whose prayers could heal; Mexican beauty queen; Esmaralda Gonzalez; religious life

April 30, 2017

   KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Easter Vigil; bully; TEC; Father Marvin Reif; Bet'sie; What makes a hero?; St. Mary of the Plains; tornado

Easter, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: SKYAC; Honorable courtship; footsteps of migrants; CHRISM Mass 2017; honoring priests; Encuentro Cross blessed; Daughters of Isabella State Convention; Fatima pilgrim statue; Mary Sharon Moore interview; Senate advances pro-life measures; love must be at the core of family life; Father John Forkuoh's car story; Confirmations; Sisters of Concordia; CNN hero Father Khalil Jaar

March 26, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: From the heart; kidney; Rother; Friar Carmelo; Schnauzer; Lauren Seachris; Lauren's Treat; fire; Guatemala; immigration; Lenten Regulations 1888; Hot Cross Buns; budget; Trump; Forkuoh; Seiwert; South Sudan; hot ashes

March 12, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Refugees; immigrants; Gilbert Herrman; When you give alms'; Lent; Call to Continuing Conversion, Rite of Election; Charell and Jeremy Owings; adoption; Our Growing Church; Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia; water; creation; Sudan; Darlow Lampe

Feb 26, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Night to shine; Immigration; immigrants; Knights of Columbus; Pete Gomez; this foreign mission; Creole; Robin Doll; Eagle Scout; Quest

Feb 12, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Catholic Schools Week; March for Life; Pro-life; Executive Order; Secular Franciscan Order; teachers; Down Syndrome; Eagle Scout; Bronze Pelican

Jan. 29, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Thank you, religious; SEEK 2017; homeless man to priest; Fourth Sunday; Secret Service to Sacred Heart; Dr. Gerard Brungardt; Martin Luther King; 110 year old nun; Toddler miracle; Letter from undocumented immigrant; health care; immigration

Jan. 15, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Mary helps us share; Tighe donates home to Birthright; Pro-life billboard; Theobald Hattrup; Helen and Steve Eck; Pearl Harbor; Reigning Grace

Dec. 18, 2017

KEYWORDS: Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe, 2016; Pope Francis Christmas schedule; 2016 high school youth rally; Aerospace engineer; Father Stanley Rother; Radio station; Dying girl's letter; Scout nominations; 12 days of Christmas

Dec. 4, 2016

KEYWORDS: Vocations Day; Pope Advent advice; Ex-prostitute; Spearville mission; Pilgrims v. Zombies; Face of God; Mission bazaar; Ness City fall festival; Rural health care; Archbishop Gomez; Bishops congratulate Trump

Nov. 20, 2016

Nov. 6, 2016

Oct. 23, 2016

Oct. 9, 2016


Sept. 25, 2016


Sept. 11, 2016

 
Aug. 7, 2016

July 10, 2016

June 12, 2016

May 29, 2016

May 8, 2016


 April 24, 2016

 April 10, 2016

 March 27, 2016

March 13, 2016

Feb. 28, 2016

 

Feb. 14, 2016


Jan. 31 , 2016

Jan. 17, 2016

Dec. 20, 2015

Dec. 6, 2015

Nov. 15, 2015

Nov. 1, 2015

Oct. 18, 2015

Oct. 4, 2015

Sept. 20, 2015

Sept. 6, 2015

August 9, 2015

July 12, 2015

Jun 14, 2015

May 17, 2015

May 3, 2015

April 19, 2015

Easter, 2015

 

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