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 Here is the Last Supper painting referenced in Dave Myers's column, in which he tells of the historian Josephus, and how he mentions the fact that Jesus and the Apostles had a pet dog named Winston. Though not mentioned in Scripture, if you squint your eyes and look very carefully, you can see a dog depicted under the table in Da Vinci's Last Supper (above).

May 20, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Track meet; Beloved Sinners; Benjamin Martin retires; Smiles; Future of Fortune Telling; Hoisington mission; DofI; Getting Equipped; Spring Social; First Communion; Confirmation

May 6, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Archbishop Romero; Seeing, Touching, Tasting; Exhortation; Father Patrick Conroy; Happy Mother's Day; A child on your doorstep; Vibrant Ministries Grant; From the heart of a young father; Love Gives Life; Roman Holiday; Smartphone; retirement
Fossil Hunting

 

    

St. Nicholas School, Kinsley, Advent Cantata, Dec. 7, 2008

 

 

 

 Vibrant Ministries Appeal Update

 

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Quilt reveals chapter in the Mexican Village

By Dave Myers
Southwest Kansas Catholic

It was among teacher Lola Adams’s first projects for her new class.

The young teacher faced her classroom of children in the small, three-room school in what was known as the Mexican Village, just south of Dodge City. The year was 1930.

“They had big brown eyes and big smiles that would go right through you,” recalled Lola Adams Crum [several years after having worked in the Mexican Village, she married Lynn Crum] in an interview with Tim Wenzl, for his book, “A History of Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish.”

During those first days as a teacher, she wanted to impart a special lesson to the children, one that would describe in a tangible way how special they were as individuals, and how important it was to support each other as a group and a community.

The project included having each child embroider his or her name onto a piece of cloth.

“Miss Adams’s lesson was to later show the children that sewn together in union, a quilt was made to serve as warmth and comfort,” explained Nora Gonzales Mode, whose parents, Manuel and Esperanza Gonzales, were students of Adams’s.  “I remember the first time she explained the reason for the quilt. … It brought tears to my eyes.”

That quilt is now on display at the Boot Hill Museum in Dodge City.

But that’s not where this story begins. The story starts with a little boy named Manuel.

“When Miss Adams first came into the village, she was scared,” Mode told the Catholic from her home in Wichita.

“She didn’t know what to expect. She was in her classroom getting everything prepared, and my father showed up with a bouquet of flowers. She mentions in her book* about this little boy with the big brown eyes coming to her and handing her this bouquet that came from flowers my grandmother had planted and grown. He knew that if Grandmother found out he took the flowers, she would be upset because her garden was her pride and joy.

“It melted Miss Adams’s heart and created a bond with the boy from childhood on. Everyone adored Miss Adams She took my dad under her wing, as he took her under his. He circulated her through the village introducing her to families, and she was welcomed. They took pride in her coming down to be a teacher. Back then, not too many people wanted to go into the village. There were people they could get, but they didn’t stay long.

“My father credits her with his academic success. Back then, male children didn’t go to school for very long, just like the girls. But he ended up getting through high school, for which he credited Miss Adams.”

This is also the story of a little girl, Esperanza “Blanch” Moreno, a classmate of Mode’s father. Miss Adams knew that from those earliest days of childhood, they would one day grow up to marry. And marry they did.

“I remember growing up going to Sunday dinner at her home with her family,” Mode said. “Those were the dinners I remember. She married Lynn Crumb when I was probably in college. I would say that was the mid-80s.”

When Mode’s mother died in 2003, the first person they saw in the procession coming up the aisle was a woman in a wheelchair--their teacher Miss Adams. “That meant the world to all of us,” Mode said. And when Miss Adams died a few years later, Mode’s father was invited to sit with the family and be a part of the service.

“My grandmother, Petra Moreno, also grew up in the Mexican Village. In our culture, we take care of our elders. We heard many stories of the village.”

Just as her parents cared for her grandparents, so too did Mode care for her parents. “This tradition was handed down to my children. I was very blessed to take care of my parents and pass that tradition.”

Miss Adams gave the quilt to Mode’s father in 2003 shortly after Mode’s mother died.

“My father cherished it. Not only because his name was on it, but also because it was that lesson she taught them that he carried with him throughout his life.”

Regardless of the many stories she heard of the village and the adventures that her parents enjoyed with their friends, Mode admitted that at first, she didn’t know who many of the people were behind the names on the quilt.

“That’s because, in the Village, they all used nicknames,” Mode said.

The one that sticks in her mind is a man who at the time had become known as  “Egghead.”

“How he got that nickname, I don’t know,” Mode said, laughing.

“Once they started mentioning nicknames, I was able to put faces to names.

“Miss Adams loved each of these children, and they in return loved her,” Mode said. “I know deep in my heart that Miss Adams and my parents would want this quilt to be shared with the community.”

 

* A Reminiscence: Teaching in Dodge City’s Mexican Village, by Lola Adams Crum

 

 

Giving yourselves, one to another

Diocese celebrates the gift of matrimony

See the list of those who registered for the anniversary Mass below.

By David Myers
Southwest Kansas Catholic

When asked the secret to a long and happy marriage, Helen Gerber replied, “A good husband.”

   Her husband, Richard, laughed and added, “A good cook. That solves a lot of problems.”

   What went unsaid—but was obvious—was that the two were in sync—in love and in humor—smiles, gentle chuckles, affection and laughter adding to the bond that has kept them together in marriage for 69 years. 

   They were the longest married couple in attendance at the Oct. 15 Matrimony Anniversary Mass reception at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe in Dodge City, an annual celebration that honors God’s gift of matrimony.

   Presiding at the Mass was the Most Rev. Ronald M. Gilmore, Bishop Emeritus of the Catholic Diocese of Dodge City.

   The longest married couple—but who were unable to attend the reception—was John and Rita Riebel, who have been married for 72 years.

   From their home in Minneola, John Riebel told the Catholic that the two met when she was helping tend the cattle at her cousin’s farm in Ness City, where John was reared.

   “I saw her look out the window and I asked her if she would like to go into town with us that evening,” John said with a grin. “She turned me down flat.”

   “He was persistent,” Rita added. Eventually the two spent their first date at the movies.          

   Meanwhile, John’s brother, Clarence, began dating Rita’s sister, Julia.

   “I lived in Holcomb and John lived in Ness City,” Rita said. “John and Clarence used to come over to Holcomb to see us. They would say they were going rabbit hunting, and instead they’d come and see us.”

   Both couples later married; Clarence and Julia have since died. Rita is the last of her 10 brothers and sisters.  

   John, one of 12 children (four of whom became nuns), helped his father on their farm after a disease caused his father to lose two legs and one arm.

   When asked the secret to a long marriage, Rita replied without hesitation: “Our religion.” All marriages include ups and downs, some downs more serious than others. “It was our religion that helped us through those difficult times.”

   Editor’s Note: See the related article which tells the couple’s fascinating family history on Page 9.

   Before the couples renewed their marriage vows during the Mass, Bishop Gilmore asked those gathered just what or who it is that makes a marriage.

   “The State has a stake in each marriage, but it cannot tell you what a marriage is. The State does not make your marriage. The Church has a stake in your marriage, and it can tell you what God thinks marriage is, but the Church does not make your marriage. The pastor has a state in each marriage, and he, too, can tell you what marriage is, if he stays within the tradition, but the pastor does not make your marriage.

   “Neither does the flowers, or the candles, or the music; neither does the dress and the tuxedo, and the herd of attendants…,” Bishop Gilmore said.

   “Who does make it, then? … You do. You create your own marriage, just as God created man and woman, and the institution of marriage. And how did he do that? Keep it simple. He loved, he spoke his word, and there it was, the world of ours. ‘God said, Let there be light, and there was light.’

   “Made in the image and likeness of God, you do almost the same thing on your wedding day. You love, you speak your word, and there it is, this marriage of yours. You stand before the priest, the Church, and the State, but it is your word (your love, your promise, your vow) it is your word that makes your Marriage. You gather up the best that is within you, you condense it into a fragile human word, and you give yourselves away, on to the other, and to no one else, and until death do you part….

   “We celebrate today what you have done in all the years of your marriage. With you, we rest in the developed love you have for one another. With you, we are utterly lost in wonder at the serious, tested, mature love of which your marriage sings. All if us in the diocese hear that haunting melody today, and we are enchanted by it. So, we thank God, and you, for filling our world with it.”

   (Bishop Gilmore’s homily can be found in its entirety at dcdiocese.org/swkscatholic.)

   For many, it was a family affair. Little children squirmed in the pews; elderly parents celebrated their children’s anniversaries (and visa versa); and at the reception, friends and family merged from the formality of Mass to the informality of handshakes and hugs, delighting in old friends, making new ones, and enjoying a delicious meal of baked chicken.

   Bishop Gilmore made his way around the room, greeting all those in attendance, while chancery staff served the meals. This was followed by the handing out of certificates to the couples as each name was called.

   In a past Matrimony Anniversary celebration, the Most Rev. John B. Brungardt shared this prayer: “We thank you, God, for your presence in these marriages. Please help them to grow ever closer to you and to each other throughout this life so they may rejoice in your love eternally.”

 

 

The listing below is of all those who registered for the Oct. 15 Matrimony Anniversary Mass. If we missed anyone, or any information is incorrect, contact Dave at 620.227.1519, or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . Please note that the SKC is happy to include listings highlighting couples celebrating a wedding anniversary in any issue of the Catholic.

 

 

5 Years:

Verónica and Miguel Reyes, Prince of Peace Parish, Great Bend

Stacy and Jacob Bynum, St. Dominic Parish, Garden City

Ana and Juan Gaytan, Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish, Dodge City

Erika and Gerardo Hernandez, St. Mary Parish, Garden City

 

10 Years:

Adriana and Anthony Dingus, St. Mary Parish, Garden City

Georgina and Rene Paz, Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish, Dodge City

 

25 Years:

Yadira and Saul Hernandez, St. Mary Parish, Garden City

Kayla and Scott Gleason, St. Nicholas Parish, Kinsley

Evangelina and Miguel Guzman, St. Mary Parish, Garden City

Paty and Sergio Carmona, St. Anthony of Padua Parish, Liberal

 

30 Years:

Maria and Aquilino Reyes,

Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish, Dodge City (34 Years)

 

40 Years

Jana and Curtis “Sam” Widener, St. Anthony of Padua Parish, Liberal

Carolina and Jose Luis Hernandez, St. Mary Parish, Garden City

Ruth and Allen Morton, St. Andrew Parish, Wright

Maria Cecilia and Ventura Martinez Hernandez,

Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish, Dodge City

Dee and Izzy Longoria, Mary, Queen of Peace Parish, Ulysses

Raquel and Enrique Rios,

   Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish, Dodge City (42 years)

 

50 Years: 

Rita and John Oborny, Holy Trinity Parish, Rush Center, Kansas

Toney and Victor Hernandez, Mary, Queen of Peace Parish, Ulysses

Cynthia and Raymond Perez, Sacred Heart Parish, Larned

Maureen and Leon Flax, Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish, Dodge City

Jenny and Henry Cruz, St. Mary Parish, Garden City

Paula and Kenneth Vanwinkle, Sacred Heart Parish, Saint John, Kansas

Kathryn and Richard Werner, Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe, Dodge City

 

50+ Years:

59 Years: Rosemary and Robert Demel, Prince of Peace Parish, Great Bend

59 Years: Louise and Dwaine Lampe, St. John the Baptist Parish, Spearville

58 Years: Barbara and James Brungardt, St. Anthony of Padua Parish, Liberal

57 Years: Marilyn and Dennis Malleck, Sacred Heart Parish, Ness City

57 Years: Rita and Blaine Venters, St. Andrew Parish, Wright

54 Years: Donna and Leroy Schawe, Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe, Dodge City

54 Years: Shirley and Maurice Stein,  Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish, Dodge City

53 Years: Ruth and Edwin Schmidt, St. Boniface Parish, Sharon

53 Years: Ellen and Ernest Young, Holy Rosary Parish, Isabel, Kansas

53 Years: Marcie and John Putnam, Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe, Dodge City       

51 Years: Eileen and Jerome Huslig, St. Joseph Parish, Ellinwood

51 Years: Patricia and Melvin Habiger, St. John the Baptist Parish, Spearville         

 

60 Years

Vivian and Vern Goetz, Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish, Dodge City

Rita and John Liggett, St. Michael Parish, Rush Center, Kansas

Corina and Edd Ybarra, Mary, Queen of Peace Parish, Ulysses

MaryIda          and George Heskamp, St John the Baptist Parish, Spearville

Sandra and Russell Schartz,  Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish, Dodge City

Rozanne and Merton Veeder, Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish, Dodge City

Helen and Nick Elsen, Prince of Peace Parish, Great Bend

 

60+ Years

69 Years: Helen and Richard Gerber, Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish, Dodge City

67 Years: Neola and Clarence Herrman, Cathedral of our Lady of Guadelupe Parish, Ensign

65 Years: Norma and Bernard Brown, Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish, Dodge City

62 Years: Pat and Jerry Krier, St. Joseph Parish, Ashland

 

72 Years                     

Rita and John Riebel, St. Anthony Parish, Minneola

Of starter homes and joint accounts

Financial advice for the newly married

By David Myers
Southwest Kansas Catholic

INTRODUCTION: When I recently began to study my financial responsibilities when it comes to retirement, I realized how much wiser I could have been with my finances starting much earlier in life. In light of this fact, I offered some questions to Eric Haselhorst, Director of Stewardship for the Catholic Diocese of Dodge City, designed primarily for young couples just starting out.

   Southwest Kansas Catholic: Eric, I’d like to create a couple: Connie and Frank. They’ve been married for two months. Both graduated from college last June. They both have jobs, but with starter’s pay. What is the first thing Connie and Frank should consider, financially speaking, once they are married?

   Eric Haselhorst: Ideally, Connie and Frank would create joint accounts, with the person who manages money naturally being the bill payer.

   Obtain life insurance: I would suggest that each obtain a life insurance policy that is 10 times their annual income. Why? In the event of a death, that amount of money will help replace some of the activities the spouse provided, such as house cleaning, lawn care etc. A stay-at-home parent needs life insurance, too.

   Obtain health insurance: Health insurance is a must, and is often provided by employers. As of this writing, health insurance outside of an employer is a moving target as far as affordable choices.

   Create an emergency fund: An emergency fund should be a minimum of $1,000 to get started, $500 if the earner makes $20,000 or less, annually. Once financially stable and debts are paid off, the emergency fund should be three to six months of living expenses.

   Southwest Kansas Catholic: What should their priorities be when creating a budget?

   Eric Haselhorst: Depending on where Connie and Frank fall financially, the four walls are the first consideration: food, clothing, shelter, and transportation. Once those mandatory pieces are in place, other items can be considered.

   Southwest Kansas Catholic: What is the smart thing to do when considering their first home/apartment?

   Eric Haselhorst: Unless a person plans to be in area for five or more years, renting is a great option, as it buys time. Also, renters insurance is cheap and a smart buy when renting.

   Southwest Kansas Catholic: When it comes time to purchase a home, what should they be careful of so that they don’t get in way over their head?

   Eric Haselhorst: Most couples can afford more home on paper than they might want to afford when considering their lifestyle. A house payment should not exceed 25 percent of take home pay, including taxes and insurance. A 20 percent down payment on a 15-year fixed mortgage will help couples avoid being house poor, and will allow them to sleep well at night.

   Southwest Kansas Catholic: Should they be putting money away even as they are paying off debt? Or should they pay off their debt before putting money away?

   Eric Haselhorst: If Connie and Frank will aggressively pay off debt, saving money can be put on hold. The key is to try to be out of debt super fast, then to try to save 15 percent of your income while paying off the house.

   Southwest Kansas Catholic: Considering the incredibly high cost of college, how best should parents save to help pay for their children’s tuition?

   Eric Haselhorst: 529 plans in the state of Kansas have favorable tax implications. [The 529 Plan is operated by a state or educational institution, with tax advantages and potentially other incentives to make it easier to save for college and other post-secondary training for a designated beneficiary, such as a child or grandchild. See more at irs.gov/newsroom/529-plans-questions-and-answers.]

   Southwest Kansas Catholic: Could you give Connie and Frank any advice on investing?

   Eric Haselhorst: Outside advice from a qualified expert in retirement plans is a great asset. Choose one with the heart of a teacher. If you cannot explain your retirement plan to a 6th grader and have them understand it, don’t buy it.

   Southwest Kansas Catholic: What are some of the unexpected financial struggles that married couples face? What is the best way to prepare/deal with them?

   Eric Haselhorst: Our grandparents would often have a “Rainy Day” or “GOK” (God Only Knows) fund. This type of savings or emergency fund helped to soften the blow of the unknown financial troubles. Eventually, there will be a broken bone, bad transmission, flooded basement, or other type of short-term catastrophe. Having a good emergency fund, as well as health, auto, and home owners insurance, helps to insulate couples from the unexpected things of life.

 

   Eric is the Director of Stewardship for the diocese, and has been a featured speaker at numerous financial seminars, as well as at the annual diocesan Stewardship Day. He is also an author and in his off hours is a small business owner. He is married to Christine, Dodge City Community College Foundation Director. She also portrays Miss Kitty at the Long Branch Saloon at Boot Hill Museum. The couple have three children, Matthew, Allison and Kara. They reside in Dodge City and attend the Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe.

 

Faith and Light: 

Celebrating God’s special people

 They are God’s special people, smiles and laughter alighting their faces as they gather at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe in Dodge City, family and friends in tow.

   This is Faith and Light,  a time and a place when those with developmental and intellectual challenges can come together  in a non-threatening atmosphere of faith, fun and friendship.

   Leading the group for the past nine years have been Virginia and Frank Sumaya; starting at the Nov. 19 gathering, Claudia Lucero will assume the leadership of Faith and Light, following in the footsteps of the Sumayas. 

   Faith and Light is a program for people of all ages who are developmentally or intellectually challenged, and their family and friends.

   Lucero is the mother of two grown daughters and a son Tim, 11, a fifth grader at Sacred Heart School. This is their third year in Dodge City.  Faith and Light meetings are held once a month at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe. 

   “Faith and Light is for all denominations and is for the entire community,” Virginia explained. “Meetings for parents and their children are held on the third Sunday of the month.”

   Virginia will work as a recruiter for Faith and Light in the community, including reaching out to other denominations.  She also will attend the USA West Conference of Faith and Light in San Antonio in May.

   “Faith and Light is a non-denominational program,” she explained, “so we recruit other denominations to participate.  A new group of Faith and Light is starting Wichita, Coffeyville and Hutchinson.”

   Virginia shared her collection of different kinds of crosses and their history with those who attended the Dodge City gathering.  Her husband Frank also shared his thoughts with the group.

   “What is it that the cross is?” he asked.  “Jesus came to teach us to love one another–even our enemies.  He wants you to enter into a relationship with God, to be in union with him all the time so that people will see Christ in you.”

   What Frank called “the most beautiful Sign of the Cross” [during Mass when we cross our forehead, lips and chest] means “May the word of God be always on my mind, on my lips and in my heart. How powerful that is!”

   To treat others with mercy and forgiveness is hard to do sometimes, he acknowledged. 

   “People think it’s hard to enter into Heaven, but it’s not a complex thing. The most important and wonderful hug one will ever receive is when Christ welcomes you into His kingdom with the words, ‘Welcome home for your wonderful service to Me and to your brothers and sisters.

   “You are never alone, even when you are alone,” Frank said.  “Jesus is always with us.”

            The Sumayas are looking for volunteers who would like to help out at Faith and Light gatherings. They encourage other parishes to start their own Faith and Light group. For information, call Virginia at (620) 682-0455.

The courage of Clemens Riebel

Minneola couple tell fascinating story of family hardship, endurance, love

By DavE Myers
Southwest Kansas Catholic

The couple in the elegantly framed photograph are dressed in their Sunday best, his bushy, curled mustache giving clue to his Russian heritage.

   A century after this photo was taken, John Riebel, the grandson of the couple, sits in his Minneola home with his wife, Rita at his side. He is 95 and one of those lucky few individuals blessed with the sprightly demeanor of someone 30 years younger than himself.

   “That’s Grandma and Grandpa,” he says, pointing to the portrait of the Russian couple in the large, oval frame (center, right). Then, after a pause, “They were put into a camp because they were Catholic.”

   After the Bolshevik Revolution, Catholics were ruthlessly hunted down. Many were imprisoned, many others martyred.

   Clemens, John’s father (and son of the man in the photo), escaped from the camp, and at age 19 snuck onto a boat and hid in the boiler room.

   “If he’d have been caught, he’d have been killed,” Rita, John’s wife of 72 years, said.

   Astoundingly, John’s father made it all the way to Canada, from where he eventually traveled to Kansas City.

   “He rode a bicycle from Kansas City to Hays,” John said of his father. A photo of his father riding his bicycle recently sold for an unspecified but large amount at a family reunion fundraiser.  (Their bi-annual family reunions are sizeable: John had 12 brothers and sisters; Rita had 11.)

   “He used to send money home to Russia,” Rita said of her father-in-law. “Then Clemens’s brother in Russia sent word that he should stop sending money because their mother and father had starved to death in the camp.”

    “He was working on the combine when he got the news,” John said. “That was the first time I saw him cry. None of the money he had sent ever reached them.”

   John knows little of his grandparents--just a few facts jotted down in a family album, a couple of photos. Even their first names remain a mystery. Where the story of that chapter ends, another begins.

   When John’s father, Clemens, lived in Canada, he fell off a bridge into a frozen lake. The story goes that this led to a disease that, over the years, caused Clemens to lose one arm, one leg, and one leg below the knee. Along his journey he married Anna, and the two had 12 children.

   “They moved from Hays to Schoenchen, Kansas, where I was born,” John explained. “He did a lot of things with one arm. Even without limbs he was a good carpenter. He got around in a vehicle he made from a golf cart. He called it his doodlebugger.”

   “He’d go down to the store in his doodlebugger and toot his horn,” Rita added with a smile, “and they’d come out and ask what he wanted. He’d tell them, and they’d go get it. He’d pay them and go home.

   “He upended the cart one time. They found him underneath it. They picked him up and put him back in, and he drove home.”

   While Clemens and his family worked another family’s (the Rooney’s) farm, three of John’s brothers were conscripted to fight in World War II; John stayed home to help with the farming.

   “I graduated during the ‘Dirty 30s’,” John explained. “This was during the drought. I couldn’t find a job. I spent a year in Idaho, and I helped finish Clark County Lake in 1940. Then I went to work with my dad on the farm.

   “We had no electricity, no telephones or indoor plumbing,” he added. “We finally got a radio and put a six-volt battery in it.”

   “We used to listen on the radio to the inmates playing music,” Rita added. “They were actually singing and playing instruments. They were good!

   “I had to cook for 12 men,” she added of her life with John on the Rooney’s farm. “I fed ’em; they didn’t argue.”

   “I did!” Leon Riebel, John’s brother, said in answer to Rita’s admonition about not arguing over the food choice. “I still don’t like apricots. And she served ’em the whole summer! You’d think she’d run out!”

   “We had an apricot tree,” Rita said with a laugh.

   Sitting on a nearby couch at John and Rita’s home in Minneola was John’s brother and his wife, Elferyda, of Poland, visiting from Arizona to attend the 100th birthday of their sister in Wichita, Nov. 4.

   Another page in a scrapbook is turned. Another surprise.

   “That’s my grandmother and grandfather,” Rita says. “He was from Russia, too.” Fortunately, her father, also named John, didn’t have nearly so dramatic an exit from Russia. His name was John Dechant, and he was married to Isadora. Rita’s grandfather died when she was one year old. “His first wife died on the way over to America,” Rita said. “Isadora was his second wife.”

   Four of John’s sisters became women Religious, serving as Most Precious Blood Sisters in Wichita. The oldest, Sister Florenzia, turned 101 three weeks ago. Sister Barbara is 95, and Sister Leona turned 100 on Nov. 4, a celebration that drew family from near and far. The fourth sister, Sister Winifred, has since died.

   As noted in the Page 11 story about the Matrimony Anniversary Mass, at 72 years wed, Rita and John were the longest married couple to register for the Mass, but couldn’t attend when Rita became ill. The couple have six children: Linda, Dennis, Gloria, Steven, Judith and Terry, 14 grandchildren, and 25 great-grandchildren.

   Rita noted that it was their religion that kept them together all these years, through the joys and the sometimes harsh difficulties that life renders.

   Certainly they’ve had help though, un-named saints—mothers, fathers, grandpas and grandmas residing in heaven—urging them on with their prayers and example.

 

Fowler celebrates completion of window renovations

St. Anthony Parish in Fowler celebrated its newly restored stained glass windows with an open house Sunday, Oct. 29.

   The windows were recently restored by Hoefer’s Custom Stained Glass of Hutchinson.

   Father Ted Skalsky, pastor, presented an informative program regarding the history of the windows and their liturgical significance in the Catholic Faith.

   The renovation and restoration of the windows began in the Fall of 2015 with a fundraising campaign.  Current and former parishioners stepped up to show their love of the historical church by providing the nearly $124,000 needed to make the repairs.

   The stained glass windows at St. Anthony’s were originally created and installed in 1945 by Emil Frei, Inc. of St. Louis, for the price of $5,950.              

The seven nave windows of the church represent the seven sacraments: the two sanctuary windows contain the offering of Abraham and Melchisedech; the two side altar windows are the Good Shepherd and St. Francis; and the two transept windows depict the Crucifixion and the Sorrowful Mother in one and the Resurrection and Coronation in the other.  

   The need to repair and restore the 35 windows became necessary after years of heat and condensation caused considerable damage to the windows themselves, as well as the window frames.

   Repairs to large windows had to be made in Hutchinson.  One by one Scott Hoefer’s crew removed windows and took them back to Hutchinson where they were refurbished in Hoefer’s studio. 

   Smaller windows were able to be repaired and cleaned in the church.  This process continued until all 35 of the windows were repaired and restored.                

While the windows were in Hutchinson, repairs were made to the window frames to correct damage that had occurred.

   “Current and former St. Anthony’s parishioners truly outdid themselves,” said Father Ted Skalsky.   “I am very proud of how our parishioners, both current and former, stepped up to help make this renovation project happen. You can tell by the gifts and pledges we received just how proud of this church parishioners are.  They truly want this beautiful church to be preserved for generations to follow.”

   Following Father Ted’s presentations in the church, visitors were invited to the St. Anthony’s Church School for fall refreshments and fellowship.

Past Issues

April 15, 2018

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Easter Vigil; Angelica Village; Colorado woman; The art of anger; Cimarron Couple; Staats; Adoption; 

Father Ultan Murphy anniversary; Coughlan; Spiritual Advisor to Hoodlums; Woman of Courage; Oration contest; Darcy Feist  

April 1, 2018

 

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Defending Adoption; Led by the Spirit; Knights; ABC Pregnancy Center;
Memorial of Mary; Homeless; Relics; Down syndrome abortion; Chrism Mass

 

March 18, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: SKYAC; Aleksandr Men; Fasting for Priestly Vocations; Uganda; School for deaf; Rannah Evetts; Oberle; Rachel and Doug Trombley; Oscar Romero; Paul VI; DACA

 

 

March 4, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Fasting for priestly vocations; Father Juan; Fasting and prayer;
Quest Weekend 2018; DACA; With God, anything is possible; Homelessness in our communities; Rhubarb, Kansas;
What's the point of fasting; Rite of Election; same-sex couples

 

Feb. 18, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Catholic Schools Week; Rachel Doll; Ellinwood; Great Bend; Garden City; Ness City; Dodge City; Sister Rita Schwarzenberger; Nigeria; Bishop Hermes; Fasting for Priestly Vocations; World Day for Consecrated Life; 50th Anniversary St. Dominic School; What will life be like in 50 years?

 

 

Feb. 4, 2018

 

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: March for Life; Tracy and Ross Smith; Adoption; Vibrant Ministries; Faith and Light;
Pro-Life; Mortal sin to discard elderly; DACA; Abortion; Dreamers; Human Trafficking

 

Jan. 21, 2018

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Louise Korbe; Anne Frank; Miep Gies; Home Heat; Father Solanus

 

Jan. 7, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Good news and kingdom living; dreamers; Sister Teresa Orozco; Infant Adoption; Elderly; a moral conundrum; seminarian; feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe

 

Dec. 17, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Celebrate Christmas 'unplugged'; Msgr. Matthew Smith; Klan; Catholic Charities Annual Appeal; Fr. Larry Rosebaugh; A Guadalupe Encounter; Laci and Joe Salazar; A Christmas Wish; Adoption; Confession; Advent; EWTN; Christmas Blues; Tilma; Pittsburgh; PSR

 

Dec. 3, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: 2017 NCYC; Wheel of Balance; Marita Rother; Stanley Rother; slavery; trafficking; Windthorst water damage; martyred priests; confession; reconciliation; How to go to confession; recipe for codfish cakes; Catholic schools; appeal

 

Nov. 19, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Saints; Father Kola; Black Elk; Giving Tuesday; velvet Elvis; a Slice of Time; Dani Sandoval; Mexican Village; Father Tim Hickey; New faces at chancery; priests share thoughts on confession; Wheel of Balance

 

Nov. 5, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Matrimony Anniversary Mass, 2017; Riebel; Faith and Light; Scripture Day; Sex in the Bible; Quilt, Mexican Village Story; Finance; Fatima pilgrimage; Fowler church window renovation; Medicare; Crazy Glue


Oct. 15, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Father Francis Jordan; Sister Renee Kirmer; Father Rother beatified; religious liberty; RCIA Kansas; V Encuentro; Bishop Weisenburger; Daughters of Isabella; Bishop Gerber Science Center


Oct. 1, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: De Colores; Rebein; Dreamer; Pies; Kellner; Code Quilts; Sister Crucita; Feezor; Formed.org; Sin and pain

 

 Sept. 17, 2017

 

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Sister Lucy Fidelis; Underground Railroad; Sister Irene Hartman; DACA; new priests; teachers; Volunteer of the Year; Golf Classic; St. Francis Xavier; St. Nicholas Parish Center, Kinsley; seminarians; Knights Lite; Stewardship Day 2017

Sept. 3, 2017

Aug. 13, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Coronado Cross; Masada; Moody Gardens; Elders; Rother; undocumented children; cages; year of mercy; Kumi; Hollywood makeup artist; New Mexico; refugee women.

July 16, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Summer camp; tithing and almsgiving; Bill Baalmann; Nathan Schaller; Jubilarian Sisters; Sister Hortencia Rodriguez; Sister Petrona Stockemer; Sister Denise Sevart; Convocation of Catholic Leaders; Mother talks about her son entering seminary; Arcoiris; Youth group travels to Colorado Springs; Major Phillip Roth

June 11, 2017 (Updated)

Ordination; Mark Brantley; Jacob Schneider; Father's Day; Thanks, Dad!; Appeal; Sister Mary Martin Weaver; Bishop Maralit; Budget; Trafficked women; Deacon Michael Brungardt; Dead Sea Scrolls; softball; Father Urban retirement; Sister Kravec retirement; Father Mazouch retirement; Authentic Joy; Pris Climate Accord; Jack Schramm; Pieta.

May 28, 2017 (Updated)

 

Grateful Hearts; MSFS Provincial; Reddy; Reif; Opossum; Dead Sea Scrolls; Our Lady of Fatima; Jorge Herrera, Jr.; Cursillo; Kough; First Communion; Confirmation

May 14, 2017

Esteban Hernandez; citizen; Lilly Ann Rein, Amberly Jimenez, Mother's Day; peacock; Quattrocchi; President Kennedy; Teen Moms; Junior High Youth Rally; Encounter With God's Call; granny/nanny; seniors' contributions; tornado anniversary; harvest; healthcare; Mr. Brown; Store-bought teeth; Louis and Zelie Martin; Father John Sullivan; Irish priest whose prayers could heal; Mexican beauty queen; Esmaralda Gonzalez; religious life

April 30, 2017

   KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Easter Vigil; bully; TEC; Father Marvin Reif; Bet'sie; What makes a hero?; St. Mary of the Plains; tornado

Easter, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: SKYAC; Honorable courtship; footsteps of migrants; CHRISM Mass 2017; honoring priests; Encuentro Cross blessed; Daughters of Isabella State Convention; Fatima pilgrim statue; Mary Sharon Moore interview; Senate advances pro-life measures; love must be at the core of family life; Father John Forkuoh's car story; Confirmations; Sisters of Concordia; CNN hero Father Khalil Jaar

March 26, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: From the heart; kidney; Rother; Friar Carmelo; Schnauzer; Lauren Seachris; Lauren's Treat; fire; Guatemala; immigration; Lenten Regulations 1888; Hot Cross Buns; budget; Trump; Forkuoh; Seiwert; South Sudan; hot ashes

March 12, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Refugees; immigrants; Gilbert Herrman; When you give alms'; Lent; Call to Continuing Conversion, Rite of Election; Charell and Jeremy Owings; adoption; Our Growing Church; Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia; water; creation; Sudan; Darlow Lampe

Feb 26, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Night to shine; Immigration; immigrants; Knights of Columbus; Pete Gomez; this foreign mission; Creole; Robin Doll; Eagle Scout; Quest

Feb 12, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Catholic Schools Week; March for Life; Pro-life; Executive Order; Secular Franciscan Order; teachers; Down Syndrome; Eagle Scout; Bronze Pelican

Jan. 29, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Thank you, religious; SEEK 2017; homeless man to priest; Fourth Sunday; Secret Service to Sacred Heart; Dr. Gerard Brungardt; Martin Luther King; 110 year old nun; Toddler miracle; Letter from undocumented immigrant; health care; immigration

Jan. 15, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Mary helps us share; Tighe donates home to Birthright; Pro-life billboard; Theobald Hattrup; Helen and Steve Eck; Pearl Harbor; Reigning Grace

Dec. 18, 2017

KEYWORDS: Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe, 2016; Pope Francis Christmas schedule; 2016 high school youth rally; Aerospace engineer; Father Stanley Rother; Radio station; Dying girl's letter; Scout nominations; 12 days of Christmas

Dec. 4, 2016

KEYWORDS: Vocations Day; Pope Advent advice; Ex-prostitute; Spearville mission; Pilgrims v. Zombies; Face of God; Mission bazaar; Ness City fall festival; Rural health care; Archbishop Gomez; Bishops congratulate Trump

Nov. 20, 2016

Nov. 6, 2016

Oct. 23, 2016

Oct. 9, 2016


Sept. 25, 2016


Sept. 11, 2016

 
Aug. 7, 2016

July 10, 2016

June 12, 2016

May 29, 2016

May 8, 2016


 April 24, 2016

 April 10, 2016

 March 27, 2016

March 13, 2016

Feb. 28, 2016

 

Feb. 14, 2016


Jan. 31 , 2016

Jan. 17, 2016

Dec. 20, 2015

Dec. 6, 2015

Nov. 15, 2015

Nov. 1, 2015

Oct. 18, 2015

Oct. 4, 2015

Sept. 20, 2015

Sept. 6, 2015

August 9, 2015

July 12, 2015

Jun 14, 2015

May 17, 2015

May 3, 2015

April 19, 2015

Easter, 2015

 

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