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August 4, 2019

IN THIS ISSUE: Prayer and Action; Action for Alex; Totus Tuus; Camp Cristo Rey; Father Schawe in GuatemalaSt. Francis Cabrini Fraternity; EmPowering those facing challenges; Pro-Life group brings help, hope to border; Seminarians' Summer Ministries; How Catholics Pray

July 7, 2019

    The Dead Sea Scrolls series

 

   St. Nicholas School, Kinsley, Advent Cantata, Dec. 7, 2008

 

   

 

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Thirty-six countries represented in Dodge City naturalization ceremony

Nearly 200 people take oath of citizenship in poignant celebration of human determination

By DAVE MYERS

Southwest Kansas Catholic

DODGE CITY – They came to this country with stern determination, their hopes and dreams bent on seeking a better life for them and their families.

   On June 21, 198 individuals entered the United Wireless Arena as citizens of 36 different countries — Bangladesh, Burma, Cambodia, Canada, China, Columbia, Congo, Cuba, Czech Republic, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, France, Germany, Guatemala, India, Kenya, Laos, Lebanon, Mexico, Morocco, Netherlands, Nigeria, Pakistan, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Russia, Rwanda, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Thailand, Venezuela, and Vietnam.

And when they departed an hour later, they did so as citizens of the United States, “equal in your citizenship rights with any other citizen of this country, naturalized or native born.”

It was an amazing experience, even as a bystander, to see this immensely multi-cultural crowd, surrounded by family and friends, take their oath of allegiance to the United States. One can only imagine the struggles they faced in their home country, and those they faced here as they endeavored to become citizens.

Although a civil ceremony, it was impossible not to feel God’s presence—like a proud Father smiling down upon His children.

“We’re so proud of everybody here,” Dodge City Mayor Brian Delzeit told those gathered. “In this room, we see the real purpose of the United States of America. We were founded as a nation of immigrants and we’re better off for it. … Immigrants can make our country stronger and keep America prosperous. …The American dream continues to be there as it lives on through all of you, and in the future through your children and grandchildren. This makes us stronger as a nation, and ensures that our best days are still ahead. … Congratulations and God bless you.”

Kimberly Bishop of the U.S. Customs and Immigration Service field office in Wichita addressed U.S. District Court Judge Eric Melgren:

“If it may please the court, I’d like to present for your consideration, the petition of 198 candidates for United States Citizenship. …Each candidate present today has been personally examined under oath by a designated immigration officer, and unless exempt, has demonstrated an understanding of the English language, and a knowledge and understanding of the fundamentals of the history and the principals in the form of government of the United States.

“Each person has been found to be a person of good moral character, attached to the principals of the constitution of the United States, and well-disposed to a good order and happiness of the country.”

Bishop then called out each country, the candidates from each standing to applause. Mexico had the greatest number of delegates, followed by Somalia.

With their right hand raised, they then read their oath of citizenship:

 

I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen; that I will support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States of America against all enemies foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I will bear arms on behalf of the United States when required by the law; that I will perform noncombatant service in the armed forces of the United States when required by the law; and that I will perform work of national importance under civilian direction when required by the law. And that I take this obligation freely without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, so help me God.

 

Following the oath Judge Melgren said, “Let me be the first to congratulate you as new citizens of the United States of America. This country has grown in greatness in no small part due to the talents, and the industry, and the dedication of immigrants from around the world who have come to the United States and who have staked their future here.  …

“Ladies and Gentlemen, you are now full citizens, equal in your citizenship rights, with any other citizen of this country, naturalized or native born. Through our combined effort, I believe we will continue to make this country an even better place in which to live. … We welcome you, we salute you, and we wish you well.”

Keynote speaker Dave Rebein, a Dodge City attorney, told those gathered, “Thank you for choosing America. … I know that many of you grew up in poverty. I hope that today is just one more step on the road to prosperity. … We need your help in working together to form a more perfect union, and together we can and will do good things. As a citizen of this country, you have inherited those famous inalienable rights: life, liberty, the pursuit of happiness.

“But these rights do come with responsibilities, responsibility to participate fully to vote and to run for office, to volunteer at school, to help out in your home town. All persons are created equal, that is true. But there is no guarantee of equal results. All you will get is opportunity.

“But believe me, that opportunity is without limits. … Answer that call that you find in your heart. Answer that song that stirs in your soul. … And be proud to be an American!”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Science of When Life Begins

By DAVE MYERS

Southwest Kansas Catholic

More than 150 years ago, the American Medical Association published a statement that strongly opposed abortion.

The AMA based their statement on the research of botanist Mathias Schleiden and physiologist Theodor Schwann, who determined in 1839 that the human embryo develops from the single-celled zygote, a cell formed by the joining of the sperm and the egg, one from each parent.

Prior to the discovery, theories of human development weren’t quite as well-refined.

Ancient Greeks thought that the soul entered the baby when it first laughed.

In 1677, researchers Hamm and Leeuwenhoek observed a sperm cell under the microscope and became convinced that the sperm was actually a miniature human, relying on the mother for incubation only. This was not only incorrect, but a little creepy.

It took another century for scientists to realize that both the sperm and the oocyte (a cell contained in the ovary) were necessary for the formation of the embryo. The mother wasn’t simply the host.

In 1859, the AMA officially recognized that the cell from the father and the egg from the mother together formed a “single-celled zygote” that “was alive and an independent being.”

From those findings, the AMA published its 1859 statement dispelling abortion, part of which reads: “Resolved, That while physicians have long been united in condemning the act of producing abortion at every period of gestation, except as necessary for preserving the life of either mother or child, it has become the duty of this Association, in view of the prevalence and increasing frequency of the crime, publicly to enter an earnest and solemn protest against such unwarrantable destruction of human life.”

In 2017, 158 years after the statement was published, the American College of Pediatricians issued its own statement agreeing with the findings.

The College noted that “It is clear that from the time of cell fusion, the embryo consists of elements (from both maternal and paternal origin) which function interdependently in a coordinated manner to carry on the function of the development of the human organism.  From this definition, the single-celled embryo is not just a cell, but an organism, a living being, a human being.”

Hundreds of reports and studies by physicians and scientists have been published in medical journals condemning abortion, and supporting the notion that life begins at conception, the moment at which the sperm and the egg join to form a unique human person.

So, what happened? Why is the right to have an abortion so vociferously defended today?

In an article by Frederick N. Dyer entitled, “The Physicians’ Crusade Against Abortion,” he wrote, “It is routinely and erroneously cited as proof positive that the 19th-Century physicians’ crusade against abortion had nothing to do with unborn babies and [instead has] much to do with two other considerations: physicians concern about the safety of abortion for women, and their attempts to eliminate quacks and squeeze out competition from midwives.”

In other words, it was argued that since “physician-induced abortion was no longer dangerous, and since medical regulation had eliminated the quacks, there was no reason to retain the laws against abortion.”

Dyer wrote that “A majority of justices accepted these false claims,” ultimately leading to the Roe V. Wade decision that legalized abortion.

In truth, however, in the book “Abortion in America”, author James C. Mohr  actually showed that almost all of these physicians opposed abortion because they saw it as the killing of a living human being. In his book, Mohr acknowledged that the “sincere belief” of physicians “‘that abortion was morally wrong’ helps to explain the intensity of their commitment to the cause.”

Mohr wrote, “The nation’s regular doctors, probably more than any other identifiable group in American society during the nineteenth century, including the clergy, defended the value of human life per se as an absolute. Scholars interested in the medical mentality of the nineteenth century will have to explain the reasons for this ideological position. . . . But whatever the reasons, regular physicians felt very strongly indeed on the issue of protecting human life. And once they had decided that human life was present to some extent in a newly fertilized ovum, however limited that extent might be, they became the fierce opponents of any attack upon it.”

One of the commonly held arguments supporting abortion claims that personhood begins after a fetus is able to survive outside the womb. Therefore, while in the womb, the fetus is not an independent being. Abortion is not the killing of a child, but is instead the termination of a pregnancy.

Why else would a person’s age be calculated from birth and not conception? Why does the U.S. Census not count unborn children? And why does the word “person,” as written in the Fourteenth Amendment, not include unborn babies?

Some issues cannot be argued. They are simply a matter of the heart based on what we hold to be true, and not on any sort of scientific inquiry.

As an editorial aside addressing this subject, many years ago, I congratulated a friend who was about to have his first grandchild:

“Congratulations,” I told Dr. John Jackson, a colonel at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs where he had worked as a physics professor. “I hear you’re going to be a grandpa!”

He looked at me and smiled. “I already am a grandpa,” the physicist said, referring to the child growing within his daughter-in-law’s womb.

Janeé Bernal accepts assistant principal position in Wichita

Janeé Bernal has resigned her position with the Dodge City Diocese as Director of Matrimony, Family Life, and NFP, as of the end of May, to accept an assistant principal position at a Catholic school in Wichita.

A letter on the diocesan website read: “Though this has been a wonderful position and has fueled her passion for evangelization, the Lord has called her and her family down another path. She has been hired as the new Assistant Principal at Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic School in Wichita.

“Janeé wants to thank the people of the Dodge City Diocese for their generosity and kindness during the past year.”

Bernal said, “The Catholic Diocese of Dodge City has been a wonderful place to grow up and to serve. It has taught me the importance of serving others as a missionary disciple. I will truly miss the rural hospitality and especially the priests and religious sisters that I’ve been able to call friends.”

Bernal was the first person to fill the new position, created through the generous donations to the Vibrant Ministries—Uniting Our Church Appeal.

Back when she was hired a year ago, she told the Catholic, “Pope Francis said that family is key to re-invigorating our Church. We must put the emphasis on the family again. That’s the only way to put families in the pews -- to make sure families are intact.”

Prior to her hiring in Dodge City, she served for six years as Assistant Professor of Education at the Newman University Western Kansas Outreach Center in Dodge City. Before that, she taught for eight years in public education in Garden City.

Janeé and Jesse have three children, JohnPaul, 7, Gabriella, 4, both of whom attended St. Dominic School, and Jude, 1.

At a staff meeting prior to her departure, Bishop John Brungardt thanked her for her service to the diocese, and for creating a strong base on which the new director will be able to build. 

 

 

 

 

New director of Matrimony, Family Life, and NFP office proves that God’s plan begins with a Leap of Faith

 

By Dave Myers

Southwest Kansas Catholic

Diana Ramirez has been hired as the new Director of the Matrimony, Family Life, and Natural Family Planning (NFP) office.

The Dodge City resident and mother of two is proof that accepting God’s guidance and help often begins with a leap of faith.

Less than a year ago, Ramirez was a secretary at Sacred Heart Cathedral School in Dodge City, a job she enjoyed. Pregnant with her second child, she left her permanent position to accept a year-long internship at the Catholic Chancery, a position which would see her dividing her time between youth ministry, young adult ministry, and a brand-new ministry called Matrimony, Family Life, and NFP.  

“I had to trust,” the then-27-year-old said back then. “Who knows where it will take me? I have no plans; I just have to trust in God that it will all work out.”

She never could have imagined what God had in store.

A few months later, she was offered a full-time, permanent position helping Family Life director Janeé Bernal lead the office of Matrimony, Family Life and NFP.

And now, with the departure of Bernal to serve as a vice principal at a Catholic school in Wichita, Ramirez has found herself chosen to be the new director of the Matrimony, Family Life and NFP office.

While excited, the move is bittersweet for Ramirez.

“We made a really good team,” she said of Bernal, sitting next to her in the Catholic Chancery as she spoke to the SKC. The two not only worked well together, but struck up a strong friendship.

 “One of my biggest hopes in serving the diocese is to share my love of family life – a whole life appreciation — acknowledging the gift of life in the womb and in every person we encounter, so that we may come closer as brothers and sisters in Christ,” Ramirez said prophetically when she took the first few steps in her internship a year ago.

Another statement she made back then echoes what she told the Catholic recently, about delving deep into prayer, listening to the word of God and taking the path He chooses:

“I have to be open to why God has opened this door. He has a reason. I want to learn from everyone here and learn what God wants of me.”

Ramirez is married to Andres and has two children, Bernardo, 3, and Andres, 1. She has earned an Associate of Arts Degree in psychology from Dodge City Community College, and a bachelor’s degree in Pastoral Ministry from Newman University.

 

Bishop Gilmore pens last of three-volume book series:

‘Like the Dew Fall’

Special to the Catholic

A new book by Bishop Gilmore appeared this last Lenten Season, and has sold well in this country and in Canada.  Like the Dew Fall, it is called.  The last in a three volume series, it is now available for purchase at the GRACE THAT REIGNS website, gracethatreigns.com.  The cost is $25, plus shipping. 

  1. We understand you have a new book out this year, and that it ‘completes a series.’ How did all that come about?
  2. When I came to Dodge City in 1998, I began writing a column for the Catholic paper. Listen to Him, it was called.  As time passed, people would tell me they liked this or that column; that they cut one out of the paper and posted it on the refrigerator door; that they ran another through the washing machine, and could they have a new copy … that they helped them, in other words, a little or a lot.

Around that same time, Father Rene Guesnier, OSB suggested that it would be good thing to gather them together in the pages of a book, to allow people to keep them in one place. 

Years later, when GRACE THAT REIGNS started in the Diocese, Jacqueline Loh took on the daunting task of collecting the columns, of editing them, and of designing an attractive way of presenting them in book form.  She took a mass of words (a “mess” of words, it sometimes seemed), and tamed them, and coaxed them into a pleasing form.  She did the same with the columns of my retirement years  (Another Way, that one was named), and the last of her work appears in this newest volume, Like the Dew Fall.

  1. You pique my curiosity. Why a set of three?
  2. Our ancestors in the Faith thought long and hard about numbers, and their symbolic meanings: the One God, the Three persons in God, the Four cardinal virtues, the Seven sacraments, the Forty days of Lent, the Fifty days of Easter, and on and on. Our spiritual tradition is awash in numbers. I simply follow its lead in this.

In this world, there is just something pleasing about a series of three things.  Pleasing to the eye, and to the ear, and to the mind.  And this is not surprising because they were made by one God who is three persons.  He left his mark on all He made, you see.  As a preacher, a speaker, a writer, just as a Catholic, I have found myself instinctively drawn to sets of threes.  In my private moments, when no one is listening, I tell myself there is a divine reason for such a fondness. 

This new set is a tad quirky, however.  Chronologically, you would expect a “1” to be followed by a “2,” and to be ended by a “3.”  But the volumes actually saw the light of day as 2, 1, 3.  Just how that happened, I do not now remember.  I have always been more at home with words, than with numbers.  Maybe that explains it. 

  1. People say they are pleased with short pieces, and with the photographs. They love being able to dip into them in vagrant, quiet, moments.  Was that part of the hidden plan in the series?
  2. We wanted them to be attractive, of course, and especially to be useful for the average reader. People are busy with so many things nowadays.  So, yes, they were short by design, and punctuated here and there by photographs.  As a child I found unbroken blocks of print intimidating.  Still do, in fact.  Each piece is complete in itself, not intimidating or taxing in that sense, and the whole can be read at any pace the reader chooses.  But for me there was more to it than that.
  3. “More.” How do you mean?
  4. When I was a child, I was fascinated by “time.” The usual thing, you know: how birthdays seemed never to come, how Christmas took forever to get here.  I could not put it into words then, but I was always struck by how slowly, and mysteriously, time unfolded.  It was never a question for me of what I could make of time, but a question of what time could make of me. 

I devoured many “diaries” while growing up.  The letters and diaries of politicians, of painters, of writers, of musicians, of Saints, and of the people who settled in southeast Kansas, those who gave shape to the town, and the Church in which I grew up: it was pleasing to see, from the inside, what time had made of them.  Their secret pages, often meant for no other eye, appealed to my imagination. 

This set of books has something of all that in it.  Read chronologically, it is a record of what one rural bishop was seeing, and feeling, and thinking, and doing at the end of the 20th Century in Southwest Kansas.  All its problems are there, the worries, the fears, the dented hopes, the occasional tears, and the frequent smiles, they are there too.  These were the things that struck me, as one day ran into another, and exercised me, and kept me grounded in the Real, where God likes to work.  The set helps me make sense of what He … and Time … did in my years as Bishop of Dodge City. 

  1. What comes next for you? Will you continue adding to this record?  What are you working on now?
  2. There are no plans to extend this record at the moment. I leave that to “circumstance,” which is what our contemporaries call “Providence.”  The “grace of the moment” is important to me: its inspirations are always to be sought, and  always to be obeyed. So, I’ll let the Lord decide on any extension. 

I am working now on a book about Prayer: where it starts, what it is, how it grows, and where it ends in this life.  It is a large and amorphous subject, and most of us, down deep, are functional illiterates about it.  I have stumbled into, and over, and around, prayer for 77 years now.  Maybe my stumbling, and struggling, can help someone else.  I do not want to demystify prayer, mind you, I want to help others see it plain with all its mystery intact. 

 

 

Father Strasser “retires” from active ministry

By STAFF

Southwest Kansas Catholic

When asked what he would be doing after he retires, Father John Strasser laughed and replied with a hint of sarcasm, “Retire?”, once again proving that “priest” and “retirement” aren’t necessarily two words that belong in the same sentence.

“‘Retired’ priests are at premium to help out on the weekends,” he said. “That’s what I’ll be doing so our active priests can take some vacation time.”

In a time of fewer and fewer priests to serve the expanse of Southwest Kansas, he may be busier than he imagines. In the mean-time, though, the 10-year pastor of St. Nicholas Parish in Kinsley and St. Joseph Parish in Offerle will be taking a little time off.

After spending time with family in his home town of Garden City—he has two brothers and one sister living there—he will venture off to Rome in August for a three-month sabbatical (although he admits with a laugh that once you’re retired, it’s not really a sabbatical).

“It’s a three-part program,” he explained. “One module has a focus on Scripture, another on Church history through the saints, and a third on art. You can do one or more of the modules; I’ll do all three.

“That’s the first thing I’ll do.” 

After that, Father Strasser hasn’t made any plans—including that of where he intends to live. For now, he’s depending on the kindness of farmers, including his brothers, who may still be occupied with harvest to help him move out of his Kinsley rectory.

Father Strasser was ordained to the priesthood June 12, 1976, by Bishop Forst at St. Dominic Church, Garden City. He served as an associate pastor at St. Anthony, Liberal (1976-1980), and Sacred Heart Cathedral, Dodge City (1980-1984), before receiving his first pastorate. His pastorates include: Sacred Heart, Ness City (1984-1988), with the addition of St. Aloysius, Random in 1985; St. Rose of Lima, Great Bend (1988-1994), with the addition of St. Francis Xavier, Seward, in 1992; Sacred Heart Cathedral, (1994-2001); the Barber County parish cluster of Holy Rosary, Medicine Lodge, St. John, Kiowa, and St. Boniface, Sharon (2001-2009); and St. Nicholas, Kinsley and St, Joseph, Offerle, (2009-2019). Father Strasser has served as a member of the Presbyterial Council, Priests’ Retirement Fund, Diocesan Consultors, Diocesan Finance Council, Personnel Council, and Diocesan Review Board.

“I remember Bishop [Marion] Forst saying this, and it proved true over the years: Being a parish priest, you celebrate with families their most joyful times, and sad times. From marriages and baptisms, to illness and death. You are blessed to be there for both.”

In an earlier interview, when asked “What have you liked most about being a priest?”, he responded, “Helping people realize that God is with them in the joys and sorrows of life, and in the daily routine of life.”

On June 12, two days after this issue of the SKC lands in churches, Father Strasser will celebrate 43 years of priesthood.

“I call parish priests in this part of the world ‘general practitioners,’” he said with a chuckle. “Most professionals are specialized, doctors, lawyers, for example.

“But parish priests are still general practitioners. They do a little bit of everything, from celebrating Mass to fixing a  hole in the roof.”

And when asked if he’d like to thank anyone in particular, he replied, “Your paper isn’t big enough.”

 

Past Issues

June 9, 2019

May 19, 2019

May 5, 2019

April 21, 2019

Easter Sunday

April 7, 2019

March 24, 2019

March 10, 2019

Feb. 24, 2019

Feb. 10, 2019

Jan. 27, 2019

Jan. 13, 2019

Dec. 23, 2018

Dec. 9, 2018

Nov. 25, 2018

Nov. 11, 2018

Oct. 28, 2018

Oct. 14, 2018

Sept. 16, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: 2018 Golf Classic; student athletes; physically challenged; Leonard Stegman; Lesson in forgiveness; Sending us on a mission

Sept. 2, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Priest crisis; Scandal; Opioid addictions; Seeds of Suicide; Leightons; St. Anne; Vincke; seminarians; Dominican Sisters; Stewardship Conference; Dead Sea Scrolls; PSR programs; Roe V. Wade

 

August 12, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Prayer and Action; Totus Tuus; Janee Bernal; Diana Ramirez; Heidy Ramirez; Bishop Gilmore honored for 20 years ministry; suicide; contraception and abortion; Dead Sea Scrolls; Humanae Vitae; certification in youth ministry; Chuck Weber; Cathedral rectory chapel; Sister Viola Heichelbech; Adam Urban

July 15, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Immigration Protest/Rally; Faith and Light Fiesta; Seeing the Dead Sea Scrolls; Corpus Christi procession; Prayers for priests; Sisters turn 100; Michael Brungardt; Gerald Vincke; Massacre in San Salvador; Action for Alex 

 

June 3, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Parish Pray for Priestly Vocations; Appeal reaches $10 million; Gangs; Seminarians; Pam Willis; Why I like being a priest; Happy Father's Day; Patricia Lujan; Tyler and Rachel Bennett; Adoption Protection Act.

May 20, 2018
KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Track meet; Beloved Sinners; Benjamin Martin retires; Smiles; Future of Fortune Telling; Hoisington mission; DofI; Getting Equipped; Spring Social; First Communion; Confirmation
KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Track meet; Beloved Sinners; Benjamin Martin retires; Smiles; Future of Fortune Telling; Hoisington mission; DofI; Getting Equipped; Spring Social; First Communion; Confirmation

May 6, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Archbishop Romero; Seeing, Touching, Tasting; Exhortation; Father Patrick Conroy; Happy Mother's Day; A child on your doorstep; Vibrant Ministries Grant; From the heart of a young father; Love Gives Life; Roman Holiday; Smartphone; retirement
Fossil Hunting

 

April 15, 2018

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Easter Vigil; Angelica Village; Colorado woman; The art of anger; Cimarron Couple; Staats; Adoption; 

Father Ultan Murphy anniversary; Coughlan; Spiritual Advisor to Hoodlums; Woman of Courage; Oration contest; Darcy Feist  

 

April 1, 2018

 

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Defending Adoption; Led by the Spirit; Knights; ABC Pregnancy Center;
Memorial of Mary; Homeless; Relics; Down syndrome abortion; Chrism Mass

 

March 18, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: SKYAC; Aleksandr Men; Fasting for Priestly Vocations; Uganda; School for deaf; Rannah Evetts; Oberle; Rachel and Doug Trombley; Oscar Romero; Paul VI; DACA

 

 

March 4, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Fasting for priestly vocations; Father Juan; Fasting and prayer;
Quest Weekend 2018; DACA; With God, anything is possible; Homelessness in our communities; Rhubarb, Kansas;
What's the point of fasting; Rite of Election; same-sex couples

 

Feb. 18, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Catholic Schools Week; Rachel Doll; Ellinwood; Great Bend; Garden City; Ness City; Dodge City; Sister Rita Schwarzenberger; Nigeria; Bishop Hermes; Fasting for Priestly Vocations; World Day for Consecrated Life; 50th Anniversary St. Dominic School; What will life be like in 50 years?

 

 

Feb. 4, 2018

 

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: March for Life; Tracy and Ross Smith; Adoption; Vibrant Ministries; Faith and Light;
Pro-Life; Mortal sin to discard elderly; DACA; Abortion; Dreamers; Human Trafficking

 

Jan. 21, 2018

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Louise Korbe; Anne Frank; Miep Gies; Home Heat; Father Solanus

 

Jan. 7, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Good news and kingdom living; dreamers; Sister Teresa Orozco; Infant Adoption; Elderly; a moral conundrum; seminarian; feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe

 

 

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