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   The Dead Sea Scrolls series

 

   St. Nicholas School, Kinsley, Advent Cantata, Dec. 7, 2008

 

   

 

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Vibrant Ministries Appeal brings services to family life office

With a Little Help from My Friends

Vibrant Ministries Appeal brings services to family life office

By Dave Myers

Southwest Kansas Catholic

Due to the generosity of Catholics who donated to the Vibrant Ministries, Uniting Our Church Appeal, many people across the diocese were able to go to the movies.

It wasn’t just any movie.

“Sexual Revolution, 50 Years since Humanae Vitae,” examines Pope Paul VI’s 1968 encyclical Humanae Vitae against the backdrop of the sexual revolution of the 1960s.

Janeé Bernal, Director of the Matrimony, Family Life and Natural Family Planning office, purchased rights to show the movie on three nights. It wasn’t cheap. Recognizing the importance of the movie, she utilized funds from the Vibrant Ministries Appeal to present the important program across the diocese.

This is just one of many ways that the funds have benefitted the newly formed office.

“Funds were also used for my Pastoral Ministry coursework,” Bernal stressed. “They purchased educational resources for distribution in the diocese (including materials on matrimony as a sacrament, cohabitation, pornography, chastity, natural family planning, contraception, etc...).”

The office, which opened its doors a few months ago, was one of the goals of Bishop John Brungardt.

Quickly after Bernal was hired, she was able to attend the National Catholic Family Life Ministers Conference and Midwest Catholic Family Conference.

Additional training included FertilityPro, so that Bernal may be certified as an instructor for the diocese, as well as training in the Theology of the Body Certification Program.

Funding from the appeal has also been provided to support efforts of the Respect Life/Social Justice committee for the March for Life (Topeka and Washington D.C.), and purchased materials for instructor use during Natural Family Planning training sessions.

Last but far from least, the generosity of Catholics resulted in the hiring of Bernal to lead the new ministry.

 

 

All You Need is Love

The secret to discipleship and raising children

By Dave Myers

Southwest Kansas Catholic

“As the family goes, so goes the nation and so goes the whole world in which we live.”  — St. John Paul the Great

Being a parent of young children would be a lot easier if the job came with a survival manual.

Fortunately, one exists. Well, not a manual so much as a plan. A method. It’s called “discipleship,” a method first introduced by the Son of God, and then shared with participants at the annual Stewardship Conference in August.

When Janeé Bernal, Director of the Matrimony, Family Life and Natural Family Planning office, began her presentation, “How to be a Disciple While Parenting Young Children,” one of the first things the audience learned is that the married mother of three loves the Beatles.

Each “chapter” of her presentation was headed with a theme taken from a Beatles song.

ALL YOU NEED IS LOVE

“Ahh, isn’t this a nice thought?” she said. “It made a great song back in 1968 by the Beatles.  Is this reality in the world we live in today?  Is discipleship really that easy?”

According to Pew research, parents spend a mere 20 minutes a day interacting with their children. This includes “Get your coat,” “Where are your shoes?” “Go brush your teeth,” and a host of other parental requests/demands.

“I thought, Only 20 minutes?!  That can’t be right,” Bernal said. “But then I really started paying attention to how we operated within my own family.  After working all day and running kids here, there, and everywhere, by the time we get home, make dinner, take baths, and do homework, then it’s time for bed!  Looking at our schedule, I believe that I, too, fell into the trap and only engaged in 20 minutes of meaningful conversation with my children.  I had to change that - so I started studying.”

She learned that she and her husband, Jesse, need to be a positive example for their three children. She learned that they need to deepen their faith life. To pray together.

“Pope Francis has urged mothers and fathers to remember the weight of their example in forming their children in faith, reminding them that whether praying or arguing, ‘your children are always watching you.’  How many times have my children seen their father and I argue?  How many times have I lost my patience and been completely at a loss in handling a situation at home?  Has this severely damaged the kids?

HELP!

“So, now I’m at the point where I know we need to pray together more as a family,” she said. “But surely there is more that I need to know about how to be a disciple while parenting my children.  I turned to our friend Pope Francis. At the World Meeting of Families in 2017, he held up the family as vital to building the church for the future. He said love must be freely shared for faith to grow.  ‘That is why our families, our homes, are true domestic churches. They are the right place for faith to become life, and life to become faith,’ he said.  ‘Little gestures’ of love exist daily in the lives of family and serve to carry on God’s love as well, Pope Francis explained.  ‘These little gestures are those we learn at home, in the family. They get lost amid all the other things we do, yet they do make each day different. They are the quiet things done by mothers and grandmothers, by fathers and grandfathers, by children. They are little signs of tenderness, affection and compassion,’ he said.”

“I was beginning to understand that our family needed to …

COME TOGETHER

“One way that we can witness to our children, no matter their age, is to work, play, talk, and pray together every day,” Bernal said.  “We must use those gifts God has given us to better our home and family.  When it comes to working, our family usually empties the dishwasher together or we pick up the living room together.  The children see that when we all work together it goes very quickly and sometimes it’s me standing there telling them exactly where to put something, but after doing these kind of jobs together everyday, our children are beginning to see that this is a way to serve God.

“After we do our ‘work’ then we take some time to play together.  It might just be putting on a silly Youtube video and having a 30 second dance party.  Or it could be playing a game all together.  The most important one, I believe, is talking together.  This is difficult because you want to have meaningful conversation with everyone.  Not just a ‘How was your day?’ ‘Fine’ type of conversation.  This has led me to figure out new ways to ask my children what is going on in their lives. 

WE CAN WORK IT OUT

“Sometimes the plates will fly,” Bernal said, quoting Pope Francis. But “after the storm has passed,” things have to be worked out as soon as possible, “with a word, a gesture,” so no one ends up “isolated in this bitter broth of our resentment.”

 

Sister Rose Mary Stein, OP, to offer ‘spiritual refreshment’ across western part of diocese

Sister Rose Mary Stein, OP, to offer ‘spiritual refreshment’ across western part of diocese

Retreats empower lay-people to empower each other

By Dave Myers

Southwest Kansas Catholic

Sister Rose Mary Stein, OP, wants people the western part of the diocese to know that she is free; free to spread the Gospel through Saturday retreat experiences, to empower laypeople through the simple offering of a “few short hours where they can feel refreshed.”

If you know Sister Rose Mary, you know it’s an offer that’s difficult to refuse. Some people put you on edge, after all, on your guard. But Sister Rose Mary?

She’s among those special people who do just the opposite. You drop your guard. You share what’s in your heart. And you value her response.  

As a former teacher, coach, missionary, director of several offices such as the Office of Aging and Parents (1994-1998), her most beloved role has been that of leader of small faith communities. Many small faith communities. For the elderly. For women. For men. For teachers….

For the last two decades, she has served at Sacred Heart Cathedral (and later Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe) providing just such leadership.

As she recently left her role at the cathedral after 20 years, Sister Rose Mary decided to devote her time to empowering people through Christ’s loving message through a mini retreat on a Saturday morning until early afternoon from parishes that invite her from western rural Kansas.

“I feel God is just asking me to share my experience and wisdom as I’ve come to know Jesus in a personal, genuine and wholesome way, through reflection, prayer, scripture, and the experiences of other people” she said. “My focus is with adults—men and women, a retreat where people have more than an hour or two, but not overnight—just a small few hours, where they can be refreshed.”

Leading the retreat with Sister Rose Mary will either be a person local to that parish, or, if no one is available, someone brought with Sister Rose Mary to the parish. The invitation will always be there.

“My real passion is to empower lay people, to believe in their gifts and use their gifts,” she said. “It’s not just me doing the retreat. We’ll share faith stories and give presentations.”

In a farewell letter read to the cathedral parish from the pulpit at Masses May 31, she wrote, “…. In our culture we can sometimes forget where our true worth lies …. Like the disciples on the road to Emmaus, we have to linger with Jesus. ... We are all disciples of Christ and your gifts are needed for that someone who is waiting for a caring, loving person to reach out to him or her.”

Although she will reside in Dodge City, her new role will be in conjunction with the Heartland Center for Spirituality in Great Bend, for which she is one of the staff. 

To schedule a retreat in your parish, contact Sister Rose Mary at: home-office 620-225-7112, cell 620-789-2101 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

The Catholic vision of just immigration reform

Editor’s Note: At press time, more than 1,600 immigrant children had been reportedly relocated from shelters and foster care homes throughout the country to a tent camp near El Paso, Tex. 

 

By JD Flynn

Catholic News Agency

Denver, Colo. - A Honduran woman told an attorney back in June that federal immigration authorities took her daughter from her arms as she breastfed the child. When she reached out for her daughter, she says she was handcuffed; she stood powerless as her daughter was taken away.

The woman was in a detention center—a jail—in Texas. She was waiting to be prosecuted for illegal entry into the United States.

Her story is heart-wrenching. It cries out for justice.

Catholics see in every nursing mother an icon of our own mother, the Blessed Virgin Mary, who nursed the infant Jesus at her breast.

We see in the bond between mothers and their children a reminder of the life-giving and nurturing love of God, and the first means through which God’s love brings us into being, guides us, and protects us.

“You drew me forth from the womb,” the Psalmist wrote to the Lord, “made me safe at my mother’s breasts.”

We don’t know what happened after that Honduran girl was taken from her mother’s arms.

We don’t know if she was taken to a warehouse, to be housed with hundreds of other children who had been separated from their immigrant parents. We don’t know if she sat strapped in a car seat, squalling for her mother, near the big kids who let themselves cry only as they fall asleep on gym mats spread across the floor, behind a chain link fence.

We do know that policies that indiscriminately separate children from their migrant parents at our national border violate the sacred sovereignty of families.

But it’s not enough to condemn the treatment of a mother separated from her child without asking what should happen instead. There have been, unfortunately, too few solutions proposed to address a real problem: how should the identity of family members be verified at the border, to ensure that children are not being trafficked? That issue needs more than moralizing or grandstanding. It needs a real solution.

It’s also not enough to call for an end to family separation at the border without asking what led to this humanitarian crisis, and what kind of reforms will really make a difference.

For that reason, no matter how discouraged they are, Catholics need to lead efforts to develop comprehensive immigration reforms rooted in the principles of justice. Only serious reforms, which create a system that protects security and the right to migrate, will end humanitarian crises at the border, mass detentions and deportations, and the deaths of migrants crossing through the desert.

Among the principles of Catholic social teaching are five that seem particularly relevant to just immigration policy: That nations have a right to security; that families have the right to migrate for safety, freedom, or economic opportunity; that justice obliges countries who can receive immigrants without detriment to the welfare of their citizens to do so; that wealthy and stable nations ought to assist unstable and poor countries; and that the family is sacred, sovereign, and prior to the state.

The United States has the right to security: Porous, unsafe, and uncontrolled borders do an injustice to those who cross them, and to our country’s citizens.

The United States also has the right to call on Central and South American countries to reform their economies and to quell the violence and disorder that spurs emigration. The United States has the means, and the obligation, to help those countries work for stability, and to hold them accountable when they do not.

But the United States also has the capacity to receive legally many more immigrants than we do now. We’re facing a labor shortage that won’t be resolved by the restrictive caps and quotas we now place on immigration, or by the byzantine processes that make waiting times for legal migration longer than people’s lifetimes. And importing labor also expands our tax base and our domestic consumer base.

Those benefits outweigh the costs—measured in the provision of social services—associated with increased immigration.

Beyond the economic reasons for making it easier to come to this country are the moral reasons. We are a wealthy and safe nation. Poor people, from poor countries, have the right to migrate for work and security. Our wealth and safety will not be fatally compromised by their arrival. This is not a matter of charity. It is a matter of justice. “The money you have hoarded,” St. Basil the Great wrote in the fourth century, “belongs to the poor.”

In 1948, Pope Pius XII wrote to the bishops of the United States. He said that he was “preoccupied” and following with “anxiety...those who have been forced by revolutions in their own countries, or by unemployment or hunger to leave their homes and live in foreign lands.”

“The natural law itself, no less than devotion to humanity, urges that ways of migration be opened to these people,” the pope wrote. “For the Creator of the universe made all good things primarily for the good of all. Since land everywhere offers the possibility of supporting a large number of people, the sovereignty of the State, although it must be respected, cannot be exaggerated to the point that access to this land is, for inadequate or unjustified reasons, denied to needy and decent people from other nations, provided of course, that the public wealth, considered very carefully, does not forbid this.”

Seventy years later, the pope’s words remain true, and important. The United States needs a program of immigration reform that recognizes our moral obligation to allow broader participation in our economy. Catholics must lead the way toward this reform.

We cannot hoard our prosperity. We cannot exaggerate our national sovereignty. Our land, our jobs, our prosperity itself exists primarily for the good of all. God did not make the land on which we live, or bless the country we call home, so that we could live in comfortable security while those outside our gates suffer violence, chaos, and hunger.

The rule of law matters—it’s not reasonable or safe to expect that law-breaking at the border should continue unabated, or go unnoticed. But the justice of our laws matter too: no one can call for would-be immigrants to follow our nation’s laws without being sure that those laws are just. Our laws, measured against the Church’s criteria, are not just.

Comprehensive immigration reform, though, will be a long-time coming. It will require statesmanship, sober reflection, and serious analysis - these are not things we have come to expect from our national leaders. That both parties have reprehensible records on this matter demonstrates just how difficult our task will be. But we have to work for justice.

In the meantime, we need to insist that the sovereignty of the family is respected. There are times when parents and children should be separated - when parents have been abusive or neglectful, or when they pose a danger to their children or others. Adults who enter this country with children should be scrutinized - for the sake of the children, we should ensure that those adults really are their parents, that the children are not being trafficked or abused. But we need to do this without taking children from the arms of their mothers, or sending toddlers to live in detention facilities.

Using family separation as a deterrent for migration was and is an intolerable and contemptible injustice.

“Jesus, Mary and Joseph,” Pius XII wrote, “living in exile in Egypt to escape the fury of an evil king, are, for all times and all places, the models and protectors of every migrant, alien and refugee of whatever kind who, whether compelled by fear of persecution or by want, is forced to leave his native land, his beloved parents and relatives, his close friends, and to seek a foreign soil.”

Catholics are called to work for justice for the Honduran woman and her daughter, separated during the intimacy of nursing. We’re also called to work for a just system of migration to this country, to be its architects and champions. We are called, like Mary and Joseph, to be protectors of migrants, aliens, and refugees, especially those seeking peace as our neighbors. 

 

Sister Philomena Hrencher, OP

Former teacher, president and CEO of Central Kansas dies

Sister Philomena Hrencher, 95, died Sept. 14, 2018, in the Dominican Sisters’ convent infirmary, Great Bend. Father Robert Schremmer, V.G., celebrated the Liturgy of Christian Burial at the Dominican Chapel of the Plains. Burial followed in the Sisters’ Resurrection Cemetery.

 Born Oct. 24, 1923, in Sharon, Kan., as Irene Mary Hrencher, Sister Philomena was the daughter of the late Joseph and Josephine (Eck) Hrencher. A religious vocation from St. Boniface Parish, she entered the Dominican Sisters Sept. 14, 1937, and pronounced her first vows Aug.13, 1941. Sister Philomena celebrated 75 years of religious profession in 2016.

From 1943 to 1955, Sister Philomena taught in the parish schools at St. Mary, Chase; St. Leo at St. Leo; St. John the Evangelist, Clonmel; St. Joseph, Beaver; and St. Anthony, Fowler. After receiving her Masters in Hospital Administration from St. Louis University, she coordinated the four hospitals sponsored by the Dominican Sisters and served as President and Chief Executive Officer of Central Kansas Medical Center in Great Bend. Later she served as Assistant Treasurer for the Dominican Sisters and as a Councilor on the Sisters Leadership Team. She retired at the motherhouse in 1991.

In her homily at Sister’s funeral service, Sister Renee Dreiling shared many fond memories of Sister Philomena – from her peaceful, prayerful manner, to her kindness to the Sisters in the Infirmary and their families, to her great love of baseball and Kansas City Royals – and of her love for her siblings and her family.

Sister Philomena was preceeded in death by her siblings:  Francis Hrencher, Ruthelma Hallam, Ida Thieme, Clarence Hrencher and Josephine Inslee. She is survived by one sister, Claudine Meng, of Severy, Kan., 37 nieces and nephews and her Dominican Sisters of Peace religious community.

Memorials in honor of Sister Philomena may be sent to: Dominican Sisters of Peace, 2320 Airport Dr., Columbus OH  43219-2098.

Kinsley resident elected to top

International Daughters of Isabella office

By Dave Myers

Southwest Kansas Catholic

KINSLEY — Patricia O’Brien has begun brushing up on her French, an exercise that bears evidence to her having recently received a great honor, not to mention bragging rights for the Catholic Diocese of Dodge City.

At the August convention of the International Circle of the Daughters of Isabella in Montreal, Canada, O’Brien was elected one of only two American International Directors of the 121-year-old charitable group.

“I’m very excited about this new office,” O’Brien said. “It’s a great organization.”

As an International Director, O’Brien will oversee two international committees. The positions requires occasional travel not only across the country, but outside its borders to such places as French speaking Quebec. In fact, O’Brien’s application to run for the office had to be translated into French.

“The farther you move up, the more you need to learn a little French,” she said with a chuckle.

The position will be challenging; it will be rewarding. But the joy of her new elected position will be nothing new to O’Brien; it’s a joy she has experienced since joining the Daughters 25 years ago.

“It’s the friendship and the unique spirit of the people that you meet,” she said. “I love the charity work and get-togethers with people—doing a project for the good of others.”

The motto of the Daughters of Isabella is “Unity, Friendship, Charity.” Their multi-focus includes giving to those in need while offering a strong support base for their own members. 

“I have people ask me how I have the time, but it’s like anything else: you make time for the things that are important. We support the parish, the community, and we do civic work.”

The Daughters are organized by circles, each of which represent a community of members. It may include one parish or several. Each circle picks its own name. Kinsley’s circle is St. John Circle 494, which was founded some 86 years ago. The smaller the number, the older the circle. One of the oldest is the St. Rita Circle in Dodge City, numbered 210. If a circle were to form today, it would be numbered around 1,500.

“Each circle finds its own niche,” its own ways to serve,” O’Brien explained. “The international circle doesn’t say you do this and this. You choose what fits your circle, parish and community.”

Projects of the Kinsley Circle include the “Blessing Box,” a monthly contribution to Catholic Charities to support those in need in our diocese. State-wide, the Daughters maintain a seminary burse in each diocese and support the Knights of Columbus sonogram program.

And there are simple, close-to-home learning projects designed “to last a lifetime”. For example, the Kinsley Daughters recently hosted a program for the public at the St. Nicholas Parish Center on how to bake an apple pie. A simple premise, but one that could be housed firmly in the hearts of the participants for years and years.

Future “Learning for a Lifetime” projects include a session in which an extension agency representative will teach how to balance a check-book. Later, an instructor will teach car maintenance. The workshops are open to all members of the community.

Service is at the heart of the Daughters of Isabella community.

“At our International convention it was announced that organizational wide the Daughters had donated $2,266,477.97 and 2,338,078 hours of service work within the last year,” O’Brien said proudly.

The Daughters of Isabella was formed in 1897 by Father Michael McGivney as an auxiliary to the Knights of Columbus, which he also founded. The organization is no longer an auxiliary, and is an independent entity, O’Brien stressed.

If you think that the Daughters include only middle age or older women, O’Brien is happy to say that a 16-year-old recently joined their ranks in Kinsley. And, of course, there’s O’Brien’s own daughter, Shena, who also joined at 16, a decade ago. “She loves it,” O’Brien with a smile.

“At first when she joined at 16, she said it was like having 30 instant grandmothers,” she added, laughing. “As she’s gotten older, her opinion has matured with her age. There are many women to meet and to do projects with; they are truly a lot of support for a young person. You have people checking in on you, helping to guide your faith and your future.”

And here, O’Brien mentions one other significant bragging right, this time for the people of the state of Kansas.

“Of the hundreds of circles and thousands of members across the United States and Canada, the area with the largest numbers of Circles and members–larger than any other state or Canadian province–is right here in Kansas.”

    For more information on the Daughters of Isabella, visit www.daughtersofisabella.org. (As if to highlight the popularity of Kansas among Circles, the first article on the international DofI website as of Oct. 3 brought to light the efforts of St. Vincent de Paul Circle #211, Spearville, Kansas.)

Past Issues

Dec. 9, 2018

Nov. 25, 2018

Nov. 11, 2018

Oct. 28, 2018

Oct. 14, 2018

Sept. 16, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: 2018 Golf Classic; student athletes; physically challenged; Leonard Stegman; Lesson in forgiveness; Sending us on a mission

Sept. 2, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Priest crisis; Scandal; Opioid addictions; Seeds of Suicide; Leightons; St. Anne; Vincke; seminarians; Dominican Sisters; Stewardship Conference; Dead Sea Scrolls; PSR programs; Roe V. Wade

 

August 12, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Prayer and Action; Totus Tuus; Janee Bernal; Diana Ramirez; Heidy Ramirez; Bishop Gilmore honored for 20 years ministry; suicide; contraception and abortion; Dead Sea Scrolls; Humanae Vitae; certification in youth ministry; Chuck Weber; Cathedral rectory chapel; Sister Viola Heichelbech; Adam Urban

July 15, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Immigration Protest/Rally; Faith and Light Fiesta; Seeing the Dead Sea Scrolls; Corpus Christi procession; Prayers for priests; Sisters turn 100; Michael Brungardt; Gerald Vincke; Massacre in San Salvador; Action for Alex 

 

June 3, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Parish Pray for Priestly Vocations; Appeal reaches $10 million; Gangs; Seminarians; Pam Willis; Why I like being a priest; Happy Father's Day; Patricia Lujan; Tyler and Rachel Bennett; Adoption Protection Act.

May 20, 2018
KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Track meet; Beloved Sinners; Benjamin Martin retires; Smiles; Future of Fortune Telling; Hoisington mission; DofI; Getting Equipped; Spring Social; First Communion; Confirmation
KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Track meet; Beloved Sinners; Benjamin Martin retires; Smiles; Future of Fortune Telling; Hoisington mission; DofI; Getting Equipped; Spring Social; First Communion; Confirmation

May 6, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Archbishop Romero; Seeing, Touching, Tasting; Exhortation; Father Patrick Conroy; Happy Mother's Day; A child on your doorstep; Vibrant Ministries Grant; From the heart of a young father; Love Gives Life; Roman Holiday; Smartphone; retirement
Fossil Hunting

 

April 15, 2018

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Easter Vigil; Angelica Village; Colorado woman; The art of anger; Cimarron Couple; Staats; Adoption; 

Father Ultan Murphy anniversary; Coughlan; Spiritual Advisor to Hoodlums; Woman of Courage; Oration contest; Darcy Feist  

 

April 1, 2018

 

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Defending Adoption; Led by the Spirit; Knights; ABC Pregnancy Center;
Memorial of Mary; Homeless; Relics; Down syndrome abortion; Chrism Mass

 

March 18, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: SKYAC; Aleksandr Men; Fasting for Priestly Vocations; Uganda; School for deaf; Rannah Evetts; Oberle; Rachel and Doug Trombley; Oscar Romero; Paul VI; DACA

 

 

March 4, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Fasting for priestly vocations; Father Juan; Fasting and prayer;
Quest Weekend 2018; DACA; With God, anything is possible; Homelessness in our communities; Rhubarb, Kansas;
What's the point of fasting; Rite of Election; same-sex couples

 

Feb. 18, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Catholic Schools Week; Rachel Doll; Ellinwood; Great Bend; Garden City; Ness City; Dodge City; Sister Rita Schwarzenberger; Nigeria; Bishop Hermes; Fasting for Priestly Vocations; World Day for Consecrated Life; 50th Anniversary St. Dominic School; What will life be like in 50 years?

 

 

Feb. 4, 2018

 

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: March for Life; Tracy and Ross Smith; Adoption; Vibrant Ministries; Faith and Light;
Pro-Life; Mortal sin to discard elderly; DACA; Abortion; Dreamers; Human Trafficking

 

Jan. 21, 2018

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Louise Korbe; Anne Frank; Miep Gies; Home Heat; Father Solanus

 

Jan. 7, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Good news and kingdom living; dreamers; Sister Teresa Orozco; Infant Adoption; Elderly; a moral conundrum; seminarian; feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe

 

Dec. 17, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Celebrate Christmas 'unplugged'; Msgr. Matthew Smith; Klan; Catholic Charities Annual Appeal; Fr. Larry Rosebaugh; A Guadalupe Encounter; Laci and Joe Salazar; A Christmas Wish; Adoption; Confession; Advent; EWTN; Christmas Blues; Tilma; Pittsburgh; PSR

 

Dec. 3, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: 2017 NCYC; Wheel of Balance; Marita Rother; Stanley Rother; slavery; trafficking; Windthorst water damage; martyred priests; confession; reconciliation; How to go to confession; recipe for codfish cakes; Catholic schools; appeal

 

Nov. 19, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Saints; Father Kola; Black Elk; Giving Tuesday; velvet Elvis; a Slice of Time; Dani Sandoval; Mexican Village; Father Tim Hickey; New faces at chancery; priests share thoughts on confession; Wheel of Balance

 

Nov. 5, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Matrimony Anniversary Mass, 2017; Riebel; Faith and Light; Scripture Day; Sex in the Bible; Quilt, Mexican Village Story; Finance; Fatima pilgrimage; Fowler church window renovation; Medicare; Crazy Glue


Oct. 15, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Father Francis Jordan; Sister Renee Kirmer; Father Rother beatified; religious liberty; RCIA Kansas; V Encuentro; Bishop Weisenburger; Daughters of Isabella; Bishop Gerber Science Center


Oct. 1, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: De Colores; Rebein; Dreamer; Pies; Kellner; Code Quilts; Sister Crucita; Feezor; Formed.org; Sin and pain

 

 Sept. 17, 2017

 

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Sister Lucy Fidelis; Underground Railroad; Sister Irene Hartman; DACA; new priests; teachers; Volunteer of the Year; Golf Classic; St. Francis Xavier; St. Nicholas Parish Center, Kinsley; seminarians; Knights Lite; Stewardship Day 2017

Sept. 3, 2017

Aug. 13, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Coronado Cross; Masada; Moody Gardens; Elders; Rother; undocumented children; cages; year of mercy; Kumi; Hollywood makeup artist; New Mexico; refugee women.

July 16, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Summer camp; tithing and almsgiving; Bill Baalmann; Nathan Schaller; Jubilarian Sisters; Sister Hortencia Rodriguez; Sister Petrona Stockemer; Sister Denise Sevart; Convocation of Catholic Leaders; Mother talks about her son entering seminary; Arcoiris; Youth group travels to Colorado Springs; Major Phillip Roth

June 11, 2017 (Updated)

Ordination; Mark Brantley; Jacob Schneider; Father's Day; Thanks, Dad!; Appeal; Sister Mary Martin Weaver; Bishop Maralit; Budget; Trafficked women; Deacon Michael Brungardt; Dead Sea Scrolls; softball; Father Urban retirement; Sister Kravec retirement; Father Mazouch retirement; Authentic Joy; Pris Climate Accord; Jack Schramm; Pieta.

May 28, 2017 (Updated)

 

Grateful Hearts; MSFS Provincial; Reddy; Reif; Opossum; Dead Sea Scrolls; Our Lady of Fatima; Jorge Herrera, Jr.; Cursillo; Kough; First Communion; Confirmation

May 14, 2017

Esteban Hernandez; citizen; Lilly Ann Rein, Amberly Jimenez, Mother's Day; peacock; Quattrocchi; President Kennedy; Teen Moms; Junior High Youth Rally; Encounter With God's Call; granny/nanny; seniors' contributions; tornado anniversary; harvest; healthcare; Mr. Brown; Store-bought teeth; Louis and Zelie Martin; Father John Sullivan; Irish priest whose prayers could heal; Mexican beauty queen; Esmaralda Gonzalez; religious life

April 30, 2017

   KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Easter Vigil; bully; TEC; Father Marvin Reif; Bet'sie; What makes a hero?; St. Mary of the Plains; tornado

Easter, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: SKYAC; Honorable courtship; footsteps of migrants; CHRISM Mass 2017; honoring priests; Encuentro Cross blessed; Daughters of Isabella State Convention; Fatima pilgrim statue; Mary Sharon Moore interview; Senate advances pro-life measures; love must be at the core of family life; Father John Forkuoh's car story; Confirmations; Sisters of Concordia; CNN hero Father Khalil Jaar

March 26, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: From the heart; kidney; Rother; Friar Carmelo; Schnauzer; Lauren Seachris; Lauren's Treat; fire; Guatemala; immigration; Lenten Regulations 1888; Hot Cross Buns; budget; Trump; Forkuoh; Seiwert; South Sudan; hot ashes

March 12, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Refugees; immigrants; Gilbert Herrman; When you give alms'; Lent; Call to Continuing Conversion, Rite of Election; Charell and Jeremy Owings; adoption; Our Growing Church; Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia; water; creation; Sudan; Darlow Lampe

Feb 26, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Night to shine; Immigration; immigrants; Knights of Columbus; Pete Gomez; this foreign mission; Creole; Robin Doll; Eagle Scout; Quest

Feb 12, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Catholic Schools Week; March for Life; Pro-life; Executive Order; Secular Franciscan Order; teachers; Down Syndrome; Eagle Scout; Bronze Pelican

Jan. 29, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Thank you, religious; SEEK 2017; homeless man to priest; Fourth Sunday; Secret Service to Sacred Heart; Dr. Gerard Brungardt; Martin Luther King; 110 year old nun; Toddler miracle; Letter from undocumented immigrant; health care; immigration

Jan. 15, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Mary helps us share; Tighe donates home to Birthright; Pro-life billboard; Theobald Hattrup; Helen and Steve Eck; Pearl Harbor; Reigning Grace

Dec. 18, 2017

KEYWORDS: Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe, 2016; Pope Francis Christmas schedule; 2016 high school youth rally; Aerospace engineer; Father Stanley Rother; Radio station; Dying girl's letter; Scout nominations; 12 days of Christmas

Dec. 4, 2016

KEYWORDS: Vocations Day; Pope Advent advice; Ex-prostitute; Spearville mission; Pilgrims v. Zombies; Face of God; Mission bazaar; Ness City fall festival; Rural health care; Archbishop Gomez; Bishops congratulate Trump

Nov. 20, 2016

Nov. 6, 2016

Oct. 23, 2016

Oct. 9, 2016


Sept. 25, 2016


Sept. 11, 2016

 
Aug. 7, 2016

July 10, 2016

June 12, 2016

May 29, 2016

May 8, 2016


 April 24, 2016

 April 10, 2016

 March 27, 2016

March 13, 2016

Feb. 28, 2016

 

Feb. 14, 2016


Jan. 31 , 2016

Jan. 17, 2016

Dec. 20, 2015

Dec. 6, 2015

Nov. 15, 2015

Nov. 1, 2015

Oct. 18, 2015

Oct. 4, 2015

Sept. 20, 2015

Sept. 6, 2015

August 9, 2015

July 12, 2015

Jun 14, 2015

May 17, 2015

May 3, 2015

April 19, 2015

Easter, 2015

 

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