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Sept. 22, 2019

IN THIS ISSUE: Fiesta de Colores 2019; Billings Model of NFP; Fifth Annual Golf Classic; Stewardship Conference; Dominican Sisters Ten Year Anniversary; Young Adult Director visits colleges; Internet and Online Porn exploits children; Caring for Caregivers; Leading up to the Pan-Amazon Synod 

See the caption on Page 1 above. Apologies to Father Anselm Eke, MSP, pastor of St. John the Evangelist Parish! His name should have been included in the original caption. He can be seen riding in the back of the truck at top.

 

Sept. 8, 2019

IN THIS ISSUE: Bishop asks for your input; Catholic Charities opens new office in Garden City; Somali refugees thankful for the kindness of strangers; Teachers learn how to encounter trauma; California Confession Bill; Dominican Sisters' Anniversaries; Natural Family Planning helps to discover serious health issues; Diocese Budget for 2019-2020; Largest seminary class in 30 years; St. Mary of the Plains honors Vietnam War heroes

 

 

    The Dead Sea Scrolls series

 

   St. Nicholas School, Kinsley, Advent Cantata, Dec. 7, 2008

 

   

 

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Feb. 10, 2019

Diocese celebrates, thanks Religious women and men

By DAVID MYERS

Southwest Kansas Catholic

GREAT BEND — Their consecrated life has sent some from the plains of southwest Kansas to the jungles of Africa, others to South and Central America, and others still to the shores of China.

   For those local Religious men and women such as the Mexican Passionist Sisters and the Missionaries of St. Francis de Sales, it was the mysterious land of cattle and cowboys (or so they heard) to which they were heading, to serve God and His people of southwest Kansas.

   And on this warm, Feb. 2 winter day, they came together for the Annual World Day for Consecrated Life at St. Patrick Church at Prince of Peace Parish in Great Bend.

The celebration also happened to coincide with the Feast of the Presentation, when the baby Jesus was presented for the first time in the temple—40 days after his birth in accordance with Jewish law.

“The feast of the Presentation is a very special day for me,” Bishop John Brungardt told those gathered. (Much of his homily is included in his column on Page 1.) “I was ordained as your bishop on this feast day eight years ago.  Thank you for the many prayers, words of encouragement, cards, emails, and phone calls you have given me these many years.  You have been a blessing to me.”

He thanked all the Religious women and men gathered for their faith-filled service, and asked those gathered to pray that more will choose to serve God and His people in the Religious life.

“The Light of Christ will show them the way,” he said.

He beseeched those gathered to let the light of Christ shine forth to others, in particular those on the peripheries, such as the poor, immigrants, and others — people who may be sitting next to you in the pew.

The bishop stressed that we should remember to reach out to the lonely—from college students starting out in a new environment, away from home for the first time, to the elderly.

The bishop’s great aunt, Benedictine Sister Rosaria Schaefer, who died in 2012, “shown the light of Christ in the formation of college students, and later to her own elderly Sisters.”

“Thank you,” the bishop told everyone gathered, “for shining forth Christ’s light by your consecrated life.”

Following Mass, the participants joined for a group photo, after which they walked under a deep blue sky to the parish center where youth of the Confirmation class took coats and served drinks. The event was coordinated by the Holy Family Vocations Committee, which the bishop complimented for having produced no less than three seminarians.

Following the meal, representatives shared a few words about their order, including Dominican Sister Roserita Weber, who spoke about a recent trip to El Paso, Texas with four other Dominican Sisters, where they helped dozens of tired immigrants as they processed through immigration checkpoints to ultimately be picked up by family or friends.

(This story will be included in an upcoming issue.)

Others spoke about aiding victims of human trafficking, helping immigrants and others to retain dignity amid seemingly insurmountable struggles.

In doing so, each shared the joy of having offered a joyous yes when they heard the call to serve God and His people.

 

Honoring the diversity and beauty of consecrated vocations

 WASHINGTON (CNS) – The Catholic Church held its annual celebration of the World Day for Consecrated Life on Feb. 2, 2019. 

This celebration is a special time for individual parishes and the greater Church to celebrate the beauty of the consecrated vocation, highlight its various forms, and reflect on the unique Christ-centered witness that consecrated men and women bring to the Church and the surrounding community.

Instituted by St. Pope John Paul II in 1997, the day is celebrated in conjunction with the Feast of the Presentation of the Lord, also known as Candlemas Day, which commemorates through the blessing and lighting of candles that Christ is the light of the world. 

In the same way, consecrated persons, by belonging exclusively to Christ, act as the true hands and feet of Jesus, by bringing his love and the light of the Gospel to all those they encounter in their life and work.

Each form of consecrated life is distinct and inspired by the Holy Spirit to serve the Church through a particular charism.

Discerning one’s consecrated life involves a process of identifying the unique way in which Christ is calling one to love. 

Cardinal Joseph W. Tobin, C.Ss.R., Chairman of the USCCB’s Committee on Clergy, Consecrated Life and Vocations, offered encouraging words for those discerning a vocation to consecrated life: “Oftentimes, those discerning a vocation search for the perfect community.  The Lord, who created every heart, knows of the way He is calling each person to serve Him.  Trust that he will lead you to the vocation that is perfect for you.”

 

Who are the consecrated women and men in the Catholic Diocese of Dodge City?

The Catholic Diocese of Dodge City is currently home to nine different religious orders: two orders of men religious, and seven orders of women religious, each of which is identified by the letters attached to their name. They are also known as “consecrated.”

Women Religious serving in the Catholic Diocese of Dodge City

    Dominican Sisters of Peace (OP):

Sister Celeste Albers, Sister Myra Arney, Sister Jane Belanger, Sister Ellen Dater,

Sister Renee Dreiling, Sister Esther Fiegel, Sister Theresa Fox, Sister Jolene Geier, Sister Eloise Hertel, Sister Ann Metzen, Sister Rebecca Otter, Sister Rose Mary Stein, Sister Imelda Schmidt, Sister Francine Schwartzenberger,

Sister Janice Thome, Sister Roserita Weber.

    Mexican Passionist Sisters (CFP):

Sister Gregoria Bueno, Sister Yolanda Maria Figueroa,

Sister Julieta Mondragon Guadarrama

    Congregation of St. Joseph (CSJ):

Sister Janice Grochowsky, Sister Jan Roberts, Sister Catherine Therese Paulie

                Missionary Catechists of Divine Providence (MCDP):

Sister Angela Erevia

    Missionaries of Charity of Mary Immaculate (MCMI):

Sister Rosa Maria Martinez Solis, Sister Maria Elena Martínez-Sifuentes,

Sister Basilia Torres-Uribe

    Franciscan Sisters of Perpetual Adoration (FSPA):

Sister Paulynn Instenes, Sister Jean Michael Treba

In residence at the Dominican Sisters of Peace Motherhouse in Great Bend

Sister Corona Bayer, Sister Frances Biernacki, Sister Virginia Brungardt, Sister Kevin Clavin, Sister Mary Lou Desena, Sister Geraldine Eakes, Sister Charlene Eisenbart, Sister Clara Ann Fluech, Sister Jean Goering, Sister Marie Hegeman, Sister Dominic Haug, Sister Edith Marie Hauser, Sister Teresita Huse, Sister Joan Ice, Sister Marie Antoinette Klein, Sister Judith Lindell, Sister Alvina Miller, Sister Mary Conrad Miller, Sister Loretta Podlena, Sister Ancilla Schawe, Sister Anita Schugart, Sister Cecilia Ann Stremel, Sister Charlotte Unrein, Sister Eleanor Unrein, Sister Stella Webber,

Sister Annette Winter, Sister Joan Wolf

 

Men Religious serving in the Catholic Diocese of Dodge City

    Missionaries of St. Paul (MSP):

Father Anselm Eke

    Missionaries of St. Francis de Sales (MSFS):

Father Prakash Rao Kola, Father Aneesh Parappanattu

 

In sincere gratitude to all of those who, through their prayer and service, continue to bless the diocese with their presence.

Feb. 10, 2019

SW Kansans march in Topeka in support of life

A bus with 23 youth and sponsors from Liberal, Dodge City, Medicine Lodge and La Crosse, departed from the Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe on Monday evening, Jan. 21 to head to Topeka for an overnight stay and full-day of activities for the March for Life on Jan. 22.

But mother nature had another plan for the day. The group woke to drizzle which continued to get heavier as they neared the Topeka Performing Arts Center for the “Ignite” event and special video presentation, “I Lived on Parker Ave” and adoption talk by David Scotton.

Mass celebrated with all of the Kansas Bishops and Archbishop Naumann, followed with Bishop John B. Brungardt delivering an inspiring homily (see below left).

The March to the Capitol was cold and wet, and the rally was moved inside the Capitol building. After lunch, the group made its way back to the Capitol for 2 p.m. tours, which were cancelled due to impending predictions of ice hitting the area.

The group boarded the bus and headed south to try to miss the worst of the weather. The bus driver appreciated the many prayers the group recited for the treacherous drive home.

Despite the weather, everyone had a meaningful March for Life 2019 and came away with a renewed vigor to pass on the pro-life message in their parishes. Plans will be coming together soon for the March for Life Washington and Topeka for 2020.

                             — Gayla Kirmer

 

‘Thank you, Jesus for touching hearts!’

Bishop Brungardt concelebrated the March for Life Mass Jan. 22, during which he spoke on the theme: Jesus touches hearts: my heart, your heart, our hearts.

He first related the example of his struggle with a brain tumor these last three years. 

Surgery, radiation treatment, and medicine were all lacking and inadequate in healing him.  But only the touch of Jesus healed him, he said. 

“Thanks for your many prayers,” the bishop told those gathered.

Next, Bishop Brungardt spoke of the wound in our world of abortion, the “killing of our siblings in the womb and the hurting of their moms.  The court, the legislature, and the executive branches of government have been inadequate and lacking in doing away with abortion.  We need more prayer, more asking Jesus to touch hearts, more touching of each others’ hearts.  With God’s grace, abortion will be no more.”

Bishop Brungardt closed with three examples of what we can do:

  • respect the dignity of the human person in all life: the unborn and their moms, the immigrant, the poor, the lonely, those who do not agree with us.
  • grow in chastity. To use God’s give of human sexuality within His plan for each of us.
  • receive grace from our sacramental life: confession and Eucharist. With these blessings, we will have the wisdom, fortitude, and charity to continue in the pro-life movement.

“Thank you, Jesus, for touching hearts!”

 

‘Unique from day one: Pro-life is pro-science’

The theme for the 2019 march was, “Unique from day one: Pro-life is pro-science.”

Does the argument against abortion jive with the findings of the medical profession? The answer is “absolutely.”

The zygote, the first cell formed at the moment of conception, is the earliest developmental stage of the human embryo. It is undeniably human in that it is composed of human DNA and totally different from any other human that has ever existed. The fingerprint that each of us has — distinguishing us from any other human on the planet — is determined by that DNA on day one.

Fetal development in its simplicity and depth is astonishing. Only three weeks after fertilization, a little one’s heart starts beating. At eight weeks of pregnancy the baby has started moving around (even though Mom can’t feel this quite yet). By the 10th week of pregnancy, a baby’s fingers and toes are forming. By 13 weeks, right at the end of the first trimester, the baby has fingerprints.

During the second trimester, organs including kidneys begin to work, and expectant parents might even see their little one sucking his thumb on an ultrasound. At 19 weeks of development, a baby’s senses are developing, and she or he can likely recognize Mom’s voice at this stage.

One hundred years ago our understanding of embryonic development was very different from what it is now. Medical advancements continue to reaffirm the science behind the pro-life cause – that life begins when egg meets sperm and a new, unique, human embryo is created. Moreover, breakthroughs in science and ultrasound technology have provided a window into the womb allowing us to witness firsthand the development of life.
                                

— From RealClearPolitics.com

 

 

Pope Francis: ‘God loves you, even if you forget Him’

Pope Francis: ‘God loves you, even if you forget Him’

 Vatican City (CNA/EWTN) - God the Father will always be there for his beloved children, Pope Francis said, with a reminder that the unconditional love of God is not limited by our own sense of guilt or unworthiness.

“God is looking for you, even if you do not seek Him,” Pope Francis said in his general audience Jan. 16. “God loves you, even if you forget Him. God sees beauty in you, even if you think you have squandered all your talents in vain.”

The pope reflected on the first two words of the “Our Father,” focusing on the depth of personal love for each person found within God’s fatherhood.

“It may be that we too happen to walk on paths far from God, as happened to the prodigal son; or  fall into a loneliness that makes us feel abandoned in the world; or, again, do wrong and are paralyzed by a sense of guilt,” Pope Francis explained.

In those moments, one’s prayer should simply start by saying the word, “Father,” with the tenderness of a child who calls out “Papa” or “Abbà,” in the original Aramaic, Francis said.

“You have a father who loves you!” Pope Francis said enthusiastically. Call out to God as “Father,” and God will answer you, he said.

“If you respond to God by saying, ‘But, Father, I have done this ...’ God will answer, ‘I never lost sight of you. I saw everything. But I was always there, close to you, faithful to my love for you,’” Pope Francis said.

To call God “Father,” the pope explained, is to have  “the whole world of Jesus poured into one’s heart.”

Pope Francis described the intimacy of the Aramaic expression “Abbà” used twice in the letters of St. Paul. In his letter to the Galatians, St. Paul wrote, “As proof that you are children, God sent the spirit of his Son into our hearts, crying out, ‘Abba, Father!’”

Francis repeated the words that Italian children use, “Papa” and “Babbo,” which are equivalent to saying “Daddy” to exemplify the depth and closeness found in the word “Abba.”

“We continue to say ‘Our Father,’ but with the heart we are invited to say ‘Papa,’ to have a relationship with God like that of a child with his father, who says ‘Papa, Babbo,’” he said.

“These expressions evoke love, evoke warmth, something that projects us into the context of childhood: the image of a child completely enveloped by the embrace of a father who feels infinite tenderness for him,” he said.

Pope Francis continued, “dear brothers and sisters, to pray well, we must get to have a child’s heart … like a child in the arms of his father.”

Language matters in the abortion debate

Language matters in the abortion debate

Washington D.C. (CNA) - The language that people choose to use in reference to unborn children and ideological opponents is at the crux of the abortion debate, a pro-life Democrat argued in a New York Times op-ed this week.

“The struggle in the abortion debate is, in many ways, a struggle over language,” wrote Charles C. Camosy, who serves on the advisory board for pro-life group Democrats for Life and is an associate professor at Fordham University. 

“For example, I am pro-life. I strongly support rights and protections for mothers and children, including prenatal children, and other vulnerable populations. I want to see the laws of this country protect these people as well. In my view, this makes me pro-life. That’s why I use the phrase ‘prenatal child’ where other people would say ‘fetus,’” he said.

However, in the view of pro-choice people and of many mainstream media outlets, “I am not pro-life; I am anti-abortion. This language allows critics to dismiss me and fellow pro-lifers as single-issue obsessives, which we are not.”

Camosy noted that in recent years, those in favor of legal abortion have shifted their language from more neutral words like “autonomy” and “choice” and have used stronger, “stigma-defying” words that refer to abortion as “care” or as a “family value” or something about which one should shout.

Language choice becomes even more harmful when it is used as a tactic to dehumanize the unborn, he said. “The New York Times editorial board, for instance, recently used the phrase ‘clusters of cells that have not yet developed into viable human beings,’ in a discussion of rights being extended to a fetus in the womb, or what I call a prenatal child.

“Language like this ignores the fact that each of us once existed as ‘clusters of cells that have not yet developed into viable human beings.’ It seeks to hide the fact that by the time most surgical abortions take place, a prenatal child has electrical activity in the brain and a beating heart,” Camosy wrote.

Other terms used to dehumanize the unborn include: “tissue,” “part of the mother,” “parasite,” and “potential life,” he noted.

These words are biased because they are not used to refer to the unborn outside of an abortion context, he added. The word “baby” is used for almost everything else - doctor’s visits, baby showers, baby bumps, etc.

“We have shifted our language in ways that hide the dignity of the vulnerable, in this instance and on issues far from the abortion debate as well,” Camosy said, which “deadens one’s capacity to show concern for those who need it most.”

This language shifting, which objectifies humans and seeks to decrease their dignity, is part of what Pope Francis calls the “throwaway culture,” he noted.

Often, when Pope Francis speaks of the throwaway culture, he is referring to unbridled consumerism which dismisses the human dignity of those considered inconvenient, Camosy said, but Francis typically reserves his strongest words on the subject for the topic of abortion.

Research from Rehumanize International, a pro-life group, “has found tragic patterns in which marginalized populations are referred to as sub-humans, defective humans, parasites — and in the process become thought of as objects, things and products.”

This is limited not to unborn children, but to other vulnerable populations like immigrants, racial minorities, the elderly, people with disabilities, and prisoners, among others, he wrote.

Immigrants have also been dismissed or dehumanized using terms such as “illegals,” “swarms” of “undesirables,” “parasites,” or even “rapists” and “animals,” Camosy said.

He urged everyone who has genuine concern for vulnerable people to resist the urge to use dehumanizing language “intended to confirm biases and serve the interests of those who hold power over the weak.”

“If we are to avoid the hopelessly stale culture-war debates of the 1970s, then we must refuse the false choice between supporting vulnerable women and protecting vulnerable prenatal children,” he said.

“It will mean genuinely wrestling with the complexity of doing both. And it will mean engaging the arguments of our perceived opponents in good faith.”

It took the most innocent, helpless life to show avowed atheist the Light

It took the most innocent, helpless life to show avowed atheist the Light

By Dave Myers

Southwest Kansas Catholic

So ingrained was her atheism, that while only in the fourth grade, Jennifer Fulwiler quietly moved all the bibles in her school library from the religion section to the fiction section.

“I was always an atheist, from earliest childhood,” Fulwiler told thousands of college-age youth at the national SEEK conference in Indianapolis (see Page 3). “My father was an atheist. I didn’t ever wonder if God might exist. I never said a prayer just in case. …It just seemed kind of obvious: You only believe in what you can prove. I believe this microphone exists because I’m holding it. How can you believe in something there is no material evidence of?”

Fulwiler was one of several guest speakers at the annual conference Jan. 3-7. Among the 17,000 youth attending from around the country were 26

 students from the Catholic Diocese of Dodge City, including diocese Director of Youth Ministry, Adam Urban, and Director of Young Adult Ministry, Gentry Heimerman.

“Modern atheism is very well branded,” Fulwiler explained. “It is branded as well as Gucci and Tommy Hilfilger. It’s branded as being for the inteligencia. Smart people are atheists, right? People who question assumptions. Highly educated scientists and engineers.

“I adopted the view that’s very common in atheism: scientism. Everything must be provable by the scientific method. I clung to that because it was safe. It’s safer to say that I don’t believe in this extra stuff. I’ll never be vulnerable, never risk looking dumb.”

She took her atheism to college. It was part of her identity, she said. So, when she learned that the guy she had fallen in love with was a believer, it blew her mind.

“When I found out he believed in God, I was shocked! My husband ended up going to Yale, graduating in three years with honors, then to Columbia Law School, then Stanford Business School where he earned a masters in computer science.

“So, when I found out he believed in God, I said, ‘But you’re smart! That’s so weird!’

“Then it got even weirder! He said he believed in Jesus, which seemed so absolutely crazy to me! He said, ‘I don’t go to church, I don’t read the Bible, I rarely pray. But, I’ll tell you this. I was baptized [in the Baptist Church] when I was 13 years old. When I came up from those baptismal waters, I encountered something. I encountered someone. … I know that I encountered the living person of Jesus Christ when I was baptized, and I will never deny that. No one can every take that away from me.’”

Fulwiler was shown for the first time that you can be a reasonable, intelligent person and still believe in things that can’t be proven by the scientific method.

She didn’t immediately abandon her atheism.

Then came the birth of her first child.

“It was a shattering experience to be a part of a vulnerable new life,” she said. “I looked at this baby and I said, I know that the love that I feel for this child—the love that has come into my family since his birth—has a source that is external to the neurons in our brain. I can’t prove this. But I know more than I know anything else in the world that this love is real, and if the whole world blew up tomorrow, this love would still exist.

“And that was the moment I let go of atheism.”

The couple believed in God and in his Son, Jesus, but they had no faith center. In fact, when they were married, their common beliefs included an expressed anti-Catholicism. 

In their search for faith fulfillment, the couple decided to allow themselves to examine the Catholic Church, certain they would find reason to dismiss it. 

“When we studied what the Church actually believes, it was like we found the owners manual to the human soul,” Fulwiler said. “This Church knows us better than we know ourselves! … This Church had been saying the same truth for age after age as empire after empire has fallen away around it. We said, We see the fingerprints of God here. We see things human beings can’t do on their own. At the Easter Vigil 2007, both Joe and I became Catholic.”

Later, when they had their child baptized, Fulwiler began an introspection. How did I get here? she asked herself as she looked back on her unlikely journey. 

“I opened a drawer and to the front slid a long narrow box. It was my baptism candle. I had been baptized in a Catholic Church when I was six months old (as per the wishes of a dying grandparent).

“The moment the priest said the words of baptism and poured waters on my head when I was a baby, I was sealed with an indelible mark of belonging to Christ. Even a life of atheism could not take that away.

“You will have moments when you doubt your faith,” she concluded. “You might fall away, have difficult times, but you can always count on the grace of your baptism to guide you home.”

 

Local youth among 17,000 students SEEKing Christ

Local youth among 17,000 students SEEKing Christ

‘Young people know that they are made for something more’

By Dave Myers

Southwest Kansas Catholic

Such was the spirited energy at the SEEK conference for college students in Indianapolis, that for those local youth for whom it was their first time attending, “it was like drinking from a fire hydrant,” noted Adam Urban, Director of Youth Ministry.

Among 17,000 college-age young people gathered in Indianapolis Jan. 3-7 for the annual conference, was a group of 26 students from southwest Kansas.

“When you get that many young people together, the energy is really high,” said Urban, who attended the event with Director of Young Adult Ministry, Gentry Heimerman. “A lot of kids were overwhelmed. So much was hitting them.”

Organized by FOCUS (Fellowship of Catholic University Students), these 26 students and their 17,000 counterparts were there to become empowered: to discern which direction they would like their lives to take; to organize and participate in Bible studies back in their college community; and through the conferences music, prayer, talks and break-out sessions, to become ever closer to Christ and His children on earth.

Among the youth were some 400 priests, several popular Christian bands and nationally renowned Catholic speakers (see Page 7).

“Frankly,” said Heimerman, “the fact that we have 26 students from our diocese who are involved enough at their Newman centers to know about and willingly go on this trip is amazing in itself!

“I went with a ‘work’ mind-set and had a list of the goals I was hoping to accomplish in relation to my job here at the diocese,” Heimerman explained. “Network with other directors, find new ideas for ministry, accompany our students and bring them all together for a meal to facilitate a deeper sense of diocesan community, etc.

“These were good goals and thankfully God brought them to fruition, but I was not expecting the way in which Jesus would burst through all of that and dig things out of my heart that had unwittingly been buried so deep.”

The conference included daily Mass, adoration, confession, as well as a night in which each diocese gathered together to share over dinner what they’d learned from the event thus far. Apart from this, the students were free to attend without adhering to any one group.

“It was great to connect with people from nearby, as well as folks from all over the country who do work similar to ours and to learn from them,” Heimerman said.  “This event tells me that young people know that they are made for something more. That the ache they feel in their hearts will not be satisfied with ‘perfect careers’, ‘perfect lifestyles’, or continually updated versions of iOS. Abiding union with Love itself is what they are destined for, and SEEK aids in the acknowledgment of that truth, arm in arm with 17,000 other college students.”

Past Issues

August 4, 2019

IN THIS ISSUE: Prayer and ActionAction for AlexTotus TuusCamp Cristo ReyFather Schawe in GuatemalaSt. Francis Cabrini FraternityEmPowering those facing challenges; Pro-Life group brings help, hope to borderSeminarians' Summer MinistriesHow Catholics Pray

July 7, 2019

June 9, 2019

May 19, 2019

May 5, 2019

April 21, 2019

Easter Sunday

April 7, 2019

March 24, 2019

March 10, 2019

Feb. 24, 2019

Feb. 10, 2019

Jan. 27, 2019

Jan. 13, 2019

Dec. 23, 2018

Dec. 9, 2018

Nov. 25, 2018

Nov. 11, 2018

Oct. 28, 2018

Oct. 14, 2018

Sept. 16, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: 2018 Golf Classic; student athletes; physically challenged; Leonard Stegman; Lesson in forgiveness; Sending us on a mission

Sept. 2, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Priest crisis; Scandal; Opioid addictions; Seeds of Suicide; Leightons; St. Anne; Vincke; seminarians; Dominican Sisters; Stewardship Conference; Dead Sea Scrolls; PSR programs; Roe V. Wade

 

August 12, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Prayer and Action; Totus Tuus; Janee Bernal; Diana Ramirez; Heidy Ramirez; Bishop Gilmore honored for 20 years ministry; suicide; contraception and abortion; Dead Sea Scrolls; Humanae Vitae; certification in youth ministry; Chuck Weber; Cathedral rectory chapel; Sister Viola Heichelbech; Adam Urban

July 15, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Immigration Protest/Rally; Faith and Light Fiesta; Seeing the Dead Sea Scrolls; Corpus Christi procession; Prayers for priests; Sisters turn 100; Michael Brungardt; Gerald Vincke; Massacre in San Salvador; Action for Alex 

 

June 3, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Parish Pray for Priestly Vocations; Appeal reaches $10 million; Gangs; Seminarians; Pam Willis; Why I like being a priest; Happy Father's Day; Patricia Lujan; Tyler and Rachel Bennett; Adoption Protection Act.

May 20, 2018
KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Track meet; Beloved Sinners; Benjamin Martin retires; Smiles; Future of Fortune Telling; Hoisington mission; DofI; Getting Equipped; Spring Social; First Communion; Confirmation
KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Track meet; Beloved Sinners; Benjamin Martin retires; Smiles; Future of Fortune Telling; Hoisington mission; DofI; Getting Equipped; Spring Social; First Communion; Confirmation

May 6, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Archbishop Romero; Seeing, Touching, Tasting; Exhortation; Father Patrick Conroy; Happy Mother's Day; A child on your doorstep; Vibrant Ministries Grant; From the heart of a young father; Love Gives Life; Roman Holiday; Smartphone; retirement
Fossil Hunting

 

April 15, 2018

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Easter Vigil; Angelica Village; Colorado woman; The art of anger; Cimarron Couple; Staats; Adoption; 

Father Ultan Murphy anniversary; Coughlan; Spiritual Advisor to Hoodlums; Woman of Courage; Oration contest; Darcy Feist  

 

April 1, 2018

 

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Defending Adoption; Led by the Spirit; Knights; ABC Pregnancy Center;
Memorial of Mary; Homeless; Relics; Down syndrome abortion; Chrism Mass

 

March 18, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: SKYAC; Aleksandr Men; Fasting for Priestly Vocations; Uganda; School for deaf; Rannah Evetts; Oberle; Rachel and Doug Trombley; Oscar Romero; Paul VI; DACA

 

 

March 4, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Fasting for priestly vocations; Father Juan; Fasting and prayer;
Quest Weekend 2018; DACA; With God, anything is possible; Homelessness in our communities; Rhubarb, Kansas;
What's the point of fasting; Rite of Election; same-sex couples

 

Feb. 18, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Catholic Schools Week; Rachel Doll; Ellinwood; Great Bend; Garden City; Ness City; Dodge City; Sister Rita Schwarzenberger; Nigeria; Bishop Hermes; Fasting for Priestly Vocations; World Day for Consecrated Life; 50th Anniversary St. Dominic School; What will life be like in 50 years?

 

 

Feb. 4, 2018

 

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: March for Life; Tracy and Ross Smith; Adoption; Vibrant Ministries; Faith and Light;
Pro-Life; Mortal sin to discard elderly; DACA; Abortion; Dreamers; Human Trafficking

 

Jan. 21, 2018

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Louise Korbe; Anne Frank; Miep Gies; Home Heat; Father Solanus

 

Jan. 7, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Good news and kingdom living; dreamers; Sister Teresa Orozco; Infant Adoption; Elderly; a moral conundrum; seminarian; feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe

 

 

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