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 Oct. 28, 2018

Oct. 14, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Bishop Gerber; Youth Rally; Patricia O'Brien; Daughters of Isabella; Hrencher; just immigration reform; Sister Rose Mary Stein; Janee Bernal; Sex Abuse; Five steps; Catholic Extension; priest and homeless

 

 The Dead Sea Scrolls series

   St. Nicholas School, Kinsley, Advent Cantata, Dec. 7, 2008

 

   

 

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Farm, faith and family await one lucky child

By DAVE MYERS

Southwest Kansas Catholic

They are the kind of parents who make you wish you were a kid again.

They are the kind of parents who, when a child one day joins their family through the Catholic Charities of Southwest Kansas Adoption Program, will surround him or her with farm-bred faith and affection and all that goes with it.

 “This summer we rebuilt a go-cart,” Scott Leighton said, referring to their adopted children, Brennan, 12, and Aleaha, 7. “We were able to get the engine running. We do quite a bit of those kinds of things together.”

Brennan “has been super athletic since day one,” said his father, who is an assistant coach when not dealing with the day-to-day routine of raising children. And the children enjoy fishing … and boating … and raising livestock for 4-H.

… And tending to a large garden on the farmland outside of Bentley, northeast of Wichita, where Scott, his wife, Robbie—a physician—and their two children (and assorted animals) reside.

Brennan and Aleaha were adopted by the Leightons through Catholic Charities Dallas, and the couple are currently seeking to adopt their third child through Catholic Charities of Southwest Kansas.            The couple began the adoption process for their third child after having moved back to Kansas from Texas where Robbie was in residency.

They have thus far waited two years since signing on with the southwest Kansas office.

Brennan, much to the shock and surprise of the Leightons, came just days after having turned in their documentation.

“We just barely got the paper work done and was approved,” Scott said with a chuckle. “Two weeks later we found out about Brennan. [The birth-mother] was basically at her due date when we found out about her. It all came super-fast. I think we set a new record at the agency. We didn’t even have any baby things purchased. We called my sister who has a baby and ask what are the things we need now, like a car seat and all that. We had to hurry and get all the purchases.”

“It was a pretty exciting life change,” Robbie added. “Our birth-mom let us be in the room when he was born. It was amazing.”

As other couples have attested, the joy of finding an adoptive child is countered by the sadness in the eyes of the birth-mother when it comes time to say goodbye.

“One of our strongest memories is of our son’s birth-mother’s tears as she decided to leave the hospital,” the couple wrote on their profile, which can be seen at https://spark.adobe.com/page/RCUUWDKkC2w1S/.

“Her tears were our tears. We learned at that moment it is possible for the human heart to break and rejoice at the same time. Our gain was her loss, and we felt it very much.”

There is sadness, yet the burden for the birth-parent(s) is far lighter than in decades past thanks to the open adoption system, which allows birth parents the choice of remaining a part of the adopted child’s life. Like many parents, the Leightons were concerned at first about the system, but now wouldn’t have it any other way.

“Brennan’s birth-mom called us every day for two weeks after the adoption,” Robbie said.  “She visited the house and saw his room. When she got her GED that December, we went to her graduation.”

Their daughter Aleaha, now seven, entered the couple’s lives a few years after Brennan, a little more than six months after they submitted their paper-work.

“Her birth-mother was very, very young,” Robbie explained.

Unless you’ve lived it, it’s impossible to imagine the heart of a woman, especially a young girl, in such a situation. And for this young girl, meeting the Kansas couple proved to be too much for her.

“We didn’t get to see her,” Robbie said, sadly. But 14 months after Aleaha was born, her father and his parents contacted them. The young father wanted to meet his little birth-daughter.

“So, she knows her birth-father’s family,” Robbie said, joyfully. “They’ve seen Aleaha a number of times in the last few years.”

The children attend Catholic school in Ost, Kansas and enjoy a farm-life the couple were born into that never left them even when they moved deep into the heart of Texas. Their faith has held firm all these years, even through the roughest rough-patch of all, when Scott was partially paralyzed in a car accident, leaving him a reluctant hero to all those who mistakenly consider him disabled, and certainly to his children.

Robbie, who is a native of St. Francis and has family in Scott City, and Scott, originally from Quinter, concluded their profile on the Catholic Charities website with this final note to any soon-to-be parent seeking a family for her child:

“We look forward to a new addition to our family. Our children can’t wait to meet their new baby brother or sister and share in the adoption experience. We hope you will get to know us better.

“May God bless you and hold you in his arms as you determine what is best for you and your baby.”

 

For more information, go to https://catholiccharitiesswks.org/, or contact Catholic Charities Adoption Social Worker Lori Titsworth,  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., (620) 792-1393.

 

The seeds of suicide

By DAVE MYERS

Southwest Kansas Catholic

St. Veronica wiped the face of Jesus, bloodied by the Romans.

Larry Black of Salina as a boy wiped the face of his mother, bloodied by his father’s fists.

It was one incident of many in a troubled childhood that would ultimately lead to thoughts of suicide.

Black, a substance abuse counselor, was one of two speakers at the annual Teachers Conference Aug. 16 at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe.

The annual gathering offers a time for teachers and principals from Catholic schools across the diocese to get together to discuss important issues just prior to the start of the school year.

“The seeds of whether or not you’re a bad person … are planted early in life,” Black told those gathered. “I grew up in an alcoholic home. Imagine being seven, bringing home your report card that you are really proud of, showing it to you father and having him smack you because you didn’t mow the lawn? Or having him wake you at 3 a.m., bring you to Mom and saying, ‘This is what a c___ looks like’?”

And then there were those nights when he had to wipe the blood from his mother’s face brought by his father’s fists.

They are challenges mostly invisible to those on the outside, but yet they infect the heart of the young like a virus. It’s a virus that keeps children from having friends—they certainly can’t bring friends in the house, after all. There’s no consistency, Black said; there’s no structure. There’s no safe place—all so needed by children.

“One thing that would have been so great is to have a teacher who would have just listened to me,” Black said. “It is most important to learn what kids are encountering in their lives.”

Superintendent of Catholic Schools, Trina Delgado echoed these statements:

“We’re told that children are an open book, that we are there to fill in the pages. Yet, emotionally, that book may already be written. What we can do is to help them write the next chapter.”

But to be sure, a bad childhood isn’t the only recipe for thoughts of suicide.

“We teach them the three Rs, but we don’t teach them how to live, how to deal with shame …,” Black said.

The proclivity of social media has created a 24/7 boarding house for anonymous insults, inappropriate photo sharing, and a host of anonymous venom.

We have to start with the people who are “face-to-face with the students,” Black said, referring to teachers. “We must get into the face of the child and listen to them. If we don’t have a relationship, they won’t tell us the hard stuff. Healing starts with one human being making time for another human being.”

When Black was growing up, he battled his own thoughts of suicide. Then, one day when he was working at a fast-food restaurant drive-through window, an in-law who worked at a treatment facility came driving through and asked him to apply for a job as a counselor. The drive-through window closed, and a door opened.

With no experience, he applied. He was trained and suddenly found himself counseling those who were going through similar things to what he had experienced.

“My greatest strength is my pain,” he said. “Through my pain, I can help someone with their pain.”

50,000 die from opioids in one year

By DAVE MYERS

Southwest Kansas Catholic

If you think the opioid epidemic is bad now, it’s nothing compared to what is lurking around the corner.

“We have a flood coming our way,” substance abuse counselor Larry Black told teachers and principals gathered for the annual Diocesan Teachers Conference Aug. 16. “It’s not quite here yet, but it’s coming.”

Today, an estimated two million Americans are addicted to opioid painkillers, with an estimated 50,000 dying from opioids in one year alone.

“We see people on 60 to 80 pills a day,” Black said. “They build up a tolerance. Most start very innocently—normal people who maybe had a knee replacement. Most doctors really have the best interest of their patient at heart, but they’re busy. This doctor doesn’t want the patient to have to drive 60 or 70 miles to get their prescription filled, so they give them a month’s worth of pills.”

The problem is, the pills don’t only give relief to pain, but also to stress—stress from the workplace, the government, the typical anxieties of life. And when that month of pills is gone in a week, that’s when you see problems begin to arise. You see people turning to the black market. You see the criminal element giving supply to the demand.

“My son was the most grateful kid,” Black said. “There was a joy about him.”

Then, at 15, his behavior and attitude underwent a marked change.

“His grades went down. We would stay up with him to do his homework, but he wouldn’t turn it in. We took him to school to make sure he went in, and he’d go right out the back door.

“I think we were good parents,” Black explained. “We didn’t drink or smoke. We went to church.”

The teenager who had been so joyful brought people over “who were just plain mean. One boy later killed his father.”

Amid the trauma of everyday life, miracles do abound. Their son agreed to enter a treatment facility.

“The hardest thing to do is to get help,” Black said. “We were almost out of hope. Not only did our son learn how to live life without drugs, I learned to be a better dad. A counselor told us that you can’t focus your life on being right. I had to give up being right and focus on my relationship with my son.”

In other words, when his son got kicked out of his first facility for having been caught with a girl in his room, Black didn’t get angry. Empowered by his newfound advice, he instead joked with his son as they drove home at 3 a.m.: “She was good looking! I would have gotten kicked out for her, too!”

The most important result? “He smiled,” Black said of his troubled son.

It didn’t happen overnight. In fact, it took two stints in the treatment center before Black’s son came to terms with his drug use.

“A lot of what happens in recovery is that people feel like they deserve to be punished more for what they’ve done. I ask them, ‘The person who loves you most, how much longer do they need you to suffer?’ I didn’t want my son to suffer one more day.

“Today, my son and I text each other every day to say I love you.”

So, who is the bad guy in all this?

“The biggest bad guys? The pharmaceutical industries,” Black explained. According to addictions.com, “An estimated 254 million opioid prescriptions were filled in 2010 alone, enough to medicate every adult in the U.S. for a month on a round-the-clock basis. In that same year, pharmaceutical companies generated revenues of $11 billion from opioid sales alone.”

The result has been that opioid addiction rates have skyrocketed.

As long as there is demand, there will be supply. The best thing we can do is to communicate loudly and with resolve the dangers of opioids, to call pharmaceutical companies on the carpet. Also, he urged the medical industry to train more physicians to prescribe opioid withdrawal programs, and to increase the availability of the narcotic blocker, Naxalone, for withdrawal.

“In-patient treatment is only the beginning,” Black said. “Each person should be given a recovery coach.

“No one seeks help until the consequence of using outweigh the benefits of not using. We need to endeavor to increase the beneffits of not using.”

For more information or to seek help, visit https://ckfaddictiontreatment.org/, or call (785) 825-6224.

 

The brain’s love affair with drugs

By Charlene Scott Myers

Special to the Catholic

A man who lived for years with low self esteem — and suffered because of it — urged teachers of Catholic schools to “learn what kids are encountering in their lives.”

 The teachers from Catholic schools throughout the Diocese of Dodge City gathered at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe Aug. 16 to discuss “the opioid crisis in Kansas” and to try to figure out why students take drugs that sometimes lead them to suicide.

Three youths of varying ages have committed suicide in recent months in the Dodge City area.

 Raymond Colligan was one of the two speakers at the cathedral gathering.

“When I was a freshman at a Catholic high school, my mother learned to dislike one of my teachers because of what he taught,” Colligan recalled.

“It wasn’t such a thing as a bad word, just words used badly,” he explained.

  “We students were not allowed to use the ‘N’ word or ‘bullocks,’ (a derogatory and vulgar British slang word that means spineless and lacking in courage.)”

But apparently, his teacher used the words, and some of his classmates taunted him by yelling that Colligan’s name was “bullocks.”

So following his graduation, he set out to prove his rude classmates were wrong.      

He devoted himself to Native Americans, and worked for the Jesuits on the Rosebud Indian Reservation in South Dakota for 18 years.

“And without my consent, I was formed to do the work I do now,” he said. 

Colligan received a Masters Degree in Counseling Studies and is a Licensed Clinical Addictions Counselor.  He was employed by Valley Hope, an alcohol and drug addiction treatment center, where he worked for 18 years.

He currently is in his fourth year of private practice, in addition to counseling on an outpatient basis.

“My job is to help people seek wisdom,” he told the teachers. 

“When a student is ready, God will send the teacher,” added the speaker who said he was “raised by Dominican Sisters.”

“The desire of my heart today is to inspire,” he told his audience of teachers.  “The word ‘insparata’ means ‘divinely touched.’”

Colligan noted that drug addiction “now is described as a brain disease,” and explained why drug addicts are “captured” by drug dependency.

“The brain changes,” he explained.  “It is profound.  You have a love affair with the drugs. The brain has us seeking pleasurable behavior, and the seeking continues despite the consequences.

“There is not a person in this room who has not experienced behavior repeating itself over and over.  We are seekers of pleasure, and despite the consequences, we keep at the behavior.  We seek relief from stress and wish to feel better and improve our performance.”

Human beings also like fun, and experience cultural pressure to experiment “with this or that,” he added.  “The human brain loves what it loves.  It took a long time in the midst of my growing up to learn that I lived in a culture that addicts us.

“My father was an Irishman, and I developed my self esteem based on my performance and work.  My first job was when I was a junior in high school.  I was driven, compulsive, and later learned I was addicted to work.

“Along with that job came cigarettes.  I was a junior and 18, and I carried a pack of cigarettes, and they couldn’t do anything about it!

 “I learned that white people and white cultures have an addiction to superiority.  For the 18 years I lived with Native Americans, I learned that some cultures have awful, awful problems, and that rich people can be dangerous with their huge sense of entitlement.”

Jesus said that it was as difficult for a rich man to enter heaven as for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle, Colligan noted. 

“Poor people can get addicted to powerlessness and being victimized,” he said. “I have witnessed that.”

To break a self image and change your story takes a tremendous amount of hard work, he acknowledged.

“As a little boy, because of my father’s neglect, I believed I was unlovable, and I was not sure I would ever amount to anything.  I had to learn how to free my mind.  

“We need to look at the way we think,” he said.  “AA (Alcoholics Anonymous) has an expression ‘stinkin thinkin.’  We have to take on our attitude and way of behaving.  That’s what AA calls recovery, and that’s what I call salvation!”           

 

Please Forgive

By the MOST REV. JOHN B. BRUNGARDT

Bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Dodge City

Yes, troubling news regarding the abuse scandal in the Church.  We discussed it at length at our diocesan directors’ meeting and our presbyteral council meeting.  Some of the words expressed: betrayal, sadness, “punched in the gut,” shame, anger, horror, pain, ...

 I reflect in my mind and heart and spirit:

  • We all seek Jesus Christ, our Lord and Savior, the Wounded One. Jesus Forsaken on the cross. We ask for healing for the victims and their families.  Christ is the Divine Physician of our body and soul.  He will heal all.  “And one of them, realizing he had been healed, returned, glorifying God” (Luke 17:15).
  • We are sinners. We bishops are sinners. We priests are sinners.  All are sinners.  The Gospel from a recent Holy Mass was the question to Jesus: “how often must I forgive … ?”  Jesus responds: “seventy-seven times,” meaning we are called to keep forgiving our brothers and sisters, over and over (Matthew 18:21-22).  I am sorry.  Please forgive us bishops and priests.
  • We seek justice. Justice for the perpetrators and enablers. We ask for deeper involvement by civil authorities and the laity, in order to seek justice.  “It is [the Lord] who judges the world with justice” (Psalm 9:9).

Bring all to prayer – our Loving Lord is with you; He loves you so much.       

Stewardship Conference, Aug. 25, Dodge City

‘You must be crazy!’

or ‘How to have a conversation with those you disagree’

WHAT? Stewardship Conference

WHEN? 9:30 a.m. - 3:50 p.m., Saturday, August 25

WHERE? Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe,  3231 N. 14th St., Dodge City

WHY? The day will be filled with discussions of topics relevant to the present time. The ministry showcase in the gathering area will highlight dozens of ways you can become involved. The day concludes with the celebration of Mass

COST? There is no cost to attend.

FOOD? A lunch is provided free of charge.

FREEBIES? The ministry showcase typically offers dozens of free items to take home.

WHAT ABOUT DAYCARE? Bring the kids! Daycare will be provided.

DO I HAVE TO REGISTER? Yes, primarily for a lunch count. Go to www.dcdiocese.org/stewardship, or, you can call Eric at (620) 227-1537.

 

By Dave Myers

  Shelley Hansel could hardly have come up with a more appropriate topic for her keynote presentation at the Aug. 25, 2018 Stewardship Conference at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe in Dodge City: “How to have a conversation with those you disagree.”

Holiday dinners and discussions around the water cooler can be exercises in frustration and oftentimes anger if the individuals doing the conversing have strong differences of opinion. And in these days of intense political polarization, vehement differences of opinion are more common than not.

How many friends and family have you unfriended on Facebook due to their political views?

“We can learn how to love our family and friends while disagreeing,” Hansel says.

Most of the topics being addressed at this year’s Stewardship Conference will be just as timely.

Steve Bellinger, for example, will discuss “What if someone comes to church with a gun?” (This topic may affect your thoughts on the first address!) Yesteryear, the answer would have been an immediate, “Call the police!” But in the days when guns are more common than they were in old Spaghetti Westerns, the question isn’t as easy to answer.

I wonder just how many people around me are carrying guns?

Jessica Soto-Botello of Catholic Charities will discuss a topic much more weighty for a large minority of southwest Kansans, but important as well to friends, family and employers. Her topic? “What to do if I’m deported.”

It’s not out of the question for a person who doesn’t speak Spanish to be deported to a Spanish-speaking country. Or for a mother to be deported without being able to notify her children who await her arrival at home in a southwest Kansas town.

It’s a notion that most of us are blessed not to have to worry about, but there’s a good chance we know someone who does.

Another topic to be discussed is, “How to Fire a Volunteer.” It might be considered an odd choice for a Stewardship Conference, except when considering that this is something with which parishes often have to contend.

Conference organizer Eric Haselhorst noted that the workshop is just as much about helping volunteers to focus their talents where they’re needed most.

This year’s conference will be a little different than in years past. Instead of 50-minute breakout sessions, they will be only 20 minutes long, allowing people to attend more of the talks.

Several concurrent talks will discuss the idea of mission when it comes to coaching, conversation, and being a parent of high school age kids. Gentry Heimerman, diocesan Director of Young Adult Ministry, will discuss “Being a Missionary in Youth Ministry.” And Denise Flax will present information on making dDo-it-yourself evangelization videos.

The day includes a free lunch, a large ministry showcase highlighting area ministries (and how you can get involved), and lots of freebies. The day will conclude with the celebration of Mass.

 

For more information, or to register online, go to www.dcdiocese.org/stewardship, or call (620) 227-1537.

Past Issues

Sept. 16, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: 2018 Golf Classic; student athletes; physically challenged; Leonard Stegman; Lesson in forgiveness; Sending us on a mission

Sept. 2, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Priest crisis; Scandal; Opioid addictions; Seeds of Suicide; Leightons; St. Anne; Vincke; seminarians; Dominican Sisters; Stewardship Conference; Dead Sea Scrolls; PSR programs; Roe V. Wade

 

August 12, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Prayer and Action; Totus Tuus; Janee Bernal; Diana Ramirez; Heidy Ramirez; Bishop Gilmore honored for 20 years ministry; suicide; contraception and abortion; Dead Sea Scrolls; Humanae Vitae; certification in youth ministry; Chuck Weber; Cathedral rectory chapel; Sister Viola Heichelbech; Adam Urban

July 15, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Immigration Protest/Rally; Faith and Light Fiesta; Seeing the Dead Sea Scrolls; Corpus Christi procession; Prayers for priests; Sisters turn 100; Michael Brungardt; Gerald Vincke; Massacre in San Salvador; Action for Alex 

 

June 3, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Parish Pray for Priestly Vocations; Appeal reaches $10 million; Gangs; Seminarians; Pam Willis; Why I like being a priest; Happy Father's Day; Patricia Lujan; Tyler and Rachel Bennett; Adoption Protection Act.

May 20, 2018
KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Track meet; Beloved Sinners; Benjamin Martin retires; Smiles; Future of Fortune Telling; Hoisington mission; DofI; Getting Equipped; Spring Social; First Communion; Confirmation
KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Track meet; Beloved Sinners; Benjamin Martin retires; Smiles; Future of Fortune Telling; Hoisington mission; DofI; Getting Equipped; Spring Social; First Communion; Confirmation

May 6, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Archbishop Romero; Seeing, Touching, Tasting; Exhortation; Father Patrick Conroy; Happy Mother's Day; A child on your doorstep; Vibrant Ministries Grant; From the heart of a young father; Love Gives Life; Roman Holiday; Smartphone; retirement
Fossil Hunting

 

April 15, 2018

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Easter Vigil; Angelica Village; Colorado woman; The art of anger; Cimarron Couple; Staats; Adoption; 

Father Ultan Murphy anniversary; Coughlan; Spiritual Advisor to Hoodlums; Woman of Courage; Oration contest; Darcy Feist  

 

April 1, 2018

 

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Defending Adoption; Led by the Spirit; Knights; ABC Pregnancy Center;
Memorial of Mary; Homeless; Relics; Down syndrome abortion; Chrism Mass

 

March 18, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: SKYAC; Aleksandr Men; Fasting for Priestly Vocations; Uganda; School for deaf; Rannah Evetts; Oberle; Rachel and Doug Trombley; Oscar Romero; Paul VI; DACA

 

 

March 4, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Fasting for priestly vocations; Father Juan; Fasting and prayer;
Quest Weekend 2018; DACA; With God, anything is possible; Homelessness in our communities; Rhubarb, Kansas;
What's the point of fasting; Rite of Election; same-sex couples

 

Feb. 18, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Catholic Schools Week; Rachel Doll; Ellinwood; Great Bend; Garden City; Ness City; Dodge City; Sister Rita Schwarzenberger; Nigeria; Bishop Hermes; Fasting for Priestly Vocations; World Day for Consecrated Life; 50th Anniversary St. Dominic School; What will life be like in 50 years?

 

 

Feb. 4, 2018

 

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: March for Life; Tracy and Ross Smith; Adoption; Vibrant Ministries; Faith and Light;
Pro-Life; Mortal sin to discard elderly; DACA; Abortion; Dreamers; Human Trafficking

 

Jan. 21, 2018

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Louise Korbe; Anne Frank; Miep Gies; Home Heat; Father Solanus

 

Jan. 7, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Good news and kingdom living; dreamers; Sister Teresa Orozco; Infant Adoption; Elderly; a moral conundrum; seminarian; feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe

 

Dec. 17, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Celebrate Christmas 'unplugged'; Msgr. Matthew Smith; Klan; Catholic Charities Annual Appeal; Fr. Larry Rosebaugh; A Guadalupe Encounter; Laci and Joe Salazar; A Christmas Wish; Adoption; Confession; Advent; EWTN; Christmas Blues; Tilma; Pittsburgh; PSR

 

Dec. 3, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: 2017 NCYC; Wheel of Balance; Marita Rother; Stanley Rother; slavery; trafficking; Windthorst water damage; martyred priests; confession; reconciliation; How to go to confession; recipe for codfish cakes; Catholic schools; appeal

 

Nov. 19, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Saints; Father Kola; Black Elk; Giving Tuesday; velvet Elvis; a Slice of Time; Dani Sandoval; Mexican Village; Father Tim Hickey; New faces at chancery; priests share thoughts on confession; Wheel of Balance

 

Nov. 5, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Matrimony Anniversary Mass, 2017; Riebel; Faith and Light; Scripture Day; Sex in the Bible; Quilt, Mexican Village Story; Finance; Fatima pilgrimage; Fowler church window renovation; Medicare; Crazy Glue


Oct. 15, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Father Francis Jordan; Sister Renee Kirmer; Father Rother beatified; religious liberty; RCIA Kansas; V Encuentro; Bishop Weisenburger; Daughters of Isabella; Bishop Gerber Science Center


Oct. 1, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: De Colores; Rebein; Dreamer; Pies; Kellner; Code Quilts; Sister Crucita; Feezor; Formed.org; Sin and pain

 

 Sept. 17, 2017

 

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Sister Lucy Fidelis; Underground Railroad; Sister Irene Hartman; DACA; new priests; teachers; Volunteer of the Year; Golf Classic; St. Francis Xavier; St. Nicholas Parish Center, Kinsley; seminarians; Knights Lite; Stewardship Day 2017

Sept. 3, 2017

Aug. 13, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Coronado Cross; Masada; Moody Gardens; Elders; Rother; undocumented children; cages; year of mercy; Kumi; Hollywood makeup artist; New Mexico; refugee women.

July 16, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Summer camp; tithing and almsgiving; Bill Baalmann; Nathan Schaller; Jubilarian Sisters; Sister Hortencia Rodriguez; Sister Petrona Stockemer; Sister Denise Sevart; Convocation of Catholic Leaders; Mother talks about her son entering seminary; Arcoiris; Youth group travels to Colorado Springs; Major Phillip Roth

June 11, 2017 (Updated)

Ordination; Mark Brantley; Jacob Schneider; Father's Day; Thanks, Dad!; Appeal; Sister Mary Martin Weaver; Bishop Maralit; Budget; Trafficked women; Deacon Michael Brungardt; Dead Sea Scrolls; softball; Father Urban retirement; Sister Kravec retirement; Father Mazouch retirement; Authentic Joy; Pris Climate Accord; Jack Schramm; Pieta.

May 28, 2017 (Updated)

 

Grateful Hearts; MSFS Provincial; Reddy; Reif; Opossum; Dead Sea Scrolls; Our Lady of Fatima; Jorge Herrera, Jr.; Cursillo; Kough; First Communion; Confirmation

May 14, 2017

Esteban Hernandez; citizen; Lilly Ann Rein, Amberly Jimenez, Mother's Day; peacock; Quattrocchi; President Kennedy; Teen Moms; Junior High Youth Rally; Encounter With God's Call; granny/nanny; seniors' contributions; tornado anniversary; harvest; healthcare; Mr. Brown; Store-bought teeth; Louis and Zelie Martin; Father John Sullivan; Irish priest whose prayers could heal; Mexican beauty queen; Esmaralda Gonzalez; religious life

April 30, 2017

   KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Easter Vigil; bully; TEC; Father Marvin Reif; Bet'sie; What makes a hero?; St. Mary of the Plains; tornado

Easter, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: SKYAC; Honorable courtship; footsteps of migrants; CHRISM Mass 2017; honoring priests; Encuentro Cross blessed; Daughters of Isabella State Convention; Fatima pilgrim statue; Mary Sharon Moore interview; Senate advances pro-life measures; love must be at the core of family life; Father John Forkuoh's car story; Confirmations; Sisters of Concordia; CNN hero Father Khalil Jaar

March 26, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: From the heart; kidney; Rother; Friar Carmelo; Schnauzer; Lauren Seachris; Lauren's Treat; fire; Guatemala; immigration; Lenten Regulations 1888; Hot Cross Buns; budget; Trump; Forkuoh; Seiwert; South Sudan; hot ashes

March 12, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Refugees; immigrants; Gilbert Herrman; When you give alms'; Lent; Call to Continuing Conversion, Rite of Election; Charell and Jeremy Owings; adoption; Our Growing Church; Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia; water; creation; Sudan; Darlow Lampe

Feb 26, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Night to shine; Immigration; immigrants; Knights of Columbus; Pete Gomez; this foreign mission; Creole; Robin Doll; Eagle Scout; Quest

Feb 12, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Catholic Schools Week; March for Life; Pro-life; Executive Order; Secular Franciscan Order; teachers; Down Syndrome; Eagle Scout; Bronze Pelican

Jan. 29, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Thank you, religious; SEEK 2017; homeless man to priest; Fourth Sunday; Secret Service to Sacred Heart; Dr. Gerard Brungardt; Martin Luther King; 110 year old nun; Toddler miracle; Letter from undocumented immigrant; health care; immigration

Jan. 15, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Mary helps us share; Tighe donates home to Birthright; Pro-life billboard; Theobald Hattrup; Helen and Steve Eck; Pearl Harbor; Reigning Grace

Dec. 18, 2017

KEYWORDS: Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe, 2016; Pope Francis Christmas schedule; 2016 high school youth rally; Aerospace engineer; Father Stanley Rother; Radio station; Dying girl's letter; Scout nominations; 12 days of Christmas

Dec. 4, 2016

KEYWORDS: Vocations Day; Pope Advent advice; Ex-prostitute; Spearville mission; Pilgrims v. Zombies; Face of God; Mission bazaar; Ness City fall festival; Rural health care; Archbishop Gomez; Bishops congratulate Trump

Nov. 20, 2016

Nov. 6, 2016

Oct. 23, 2016

Oct. 9, 2016


Sept. 25, 2016


Sept. 11, 2016

 
Aug. 7, 2016

July 10, 2016

June 12, 2016

May 29, 2016

May 8, 2016


 April 24, 2016

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March 13, 2016

Feb. 28, 2016

 

Feb. 14, 2016


Jan. 31 , 2016

Jan. 17, 2016

Dec. 20, 2015

Dec. 6, 2015

Nov. 15, 2015

Nov. 1, 2015

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August 9, 2015

July 12, 2015

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April 19, 2015

Easter, 2015

 

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