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Saint of the DayBook ReviewsGuest Columnist

 

 Oct. 28, 2018

Oct. 14, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Bishop Gerber; Youth Rally; Patricia O'Brien; Daughters of Isabella; Hrencher; just immigration reform; Sister Rose Mary Stein; Janee Bernal; Sex Abuse; Five steps; Catholic Extension; priest and homeless

 

 The Dead Sea Scrolls series

   St. Nicholas School, Kinsley, Advent Cantata, Dec. 7, 2008

 

   

 

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Diocese offers certification in youth ministry

 The Catholic dioceses of Dodge City and Salina, in partnership with Newman University, will begin offering classes in youth ministry through the ITV (Interactive Television) system in September.

Two three-credit-hour courses, and three one-credit-hour courses – as well as a project decided upon by the student and the coordinating instructor -- are required to earn certification in youth ministry.

If one class is taken each semester beginning in September, 2018, a student could obtain certification by the Spring of 2020. Since the classes are a special focus of the Pastoral Ministry Formation Program, students may choose to continue classes until they earn a degree or diploma in Pastoral Ministry Formation.

Dodge City Bishop John B. Brungardt and Salina Bishop Gerald Vincke encourage every parish to have one or more parishioners prepared with a Youth Ministry Certificate so that they may support and encourage our youth in their unfolding discipleship.

The classes will:

• Seek to help those who minister to youth specifically and those who minister indirectly understand the components necessary to develop a comprehensive ministry to meet the spiritual, catechetical and social needs of our youth.

• Form adults in missionary discipleship to engage the gift of our teenagers in our Church.

• Unpack the U.S. Bishop’s document, “Renewing the Vision: A Framework for Catholic Youth Ministry”, and, “Pastoral Juvenil Hispana”.

The first course, “Theology and Methods of Ministry,” presented by Father Robert Schremmer, Vicar General, will be offered from 8:30 a.m.-Noon, Saturdays from Sept. 8-Nov. 3, 2018. This is a three-credit-hour course and is required for certification.

Core three-credit-hour courses include: Introduction to New Testament; Christian Morality and Social Issues; Christology; Sacramental Theology; Theology of the Church; The Creeds and Faith; and Introduction to Old Testament.

“The Why of Ministry,” a one-credit-hour course, will be presented by Gentry Heimerman in the Spring of 2019, and is also a required course. Heimerman, Director of Young Adult Ministry for the Diocese of Dodge City, is one of the coordinators of the new youth ministry certification program.

One-credit-hour courses include: RCIA Kansas; Celebrating Crossing Cultural Boundaries; Get Equipped; and Accompanying Youth and Young Adults on Their Journey.

Cost is $50 per credit-hour. Through “Church in Partnership”, a program of the Diocese of Dodge City and Newman University, these costs are discounted from regular prices charged by Newman University per credit hour.

For more information, visit www.dcdiocese.org, or contact Coleen Stein, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., (620) 227-1538.

 

Passion for the Mission

By CHUCK WEBER
Executive Director, Kansas Catholic Conference

The smile of a newly ordained priest is unforgettable.  His eagerness to face worldly and spiritual challenges is unmistakable.  Saving souls for Christ is now his sacred mission of service.  A steadfast reliance on the Catholic Faith, the Sacraments and the time-tested wisdom of Mother Church will see him through.

Newly ordained priests (in fact, all priests, Consecrated Religious and lay servants of the Catholic Church) inspire and energize me as I embark on my own mission—serving as Executive Director of the Kansas Catholic Conference (KCC).

The KCC is the “public policy voice” of the Catholic Bishops of Kansas, including a man I have long known and admired, Bishop John Brungardt of the Dodge City Diocese. 

Understandably, few Catholics in the pew are aware of the KCC mission. Much of our work takes place at the Statehouse in Topeka. The KCC supports and promotes legislation that respects the dignity of the human person and serves the common good.  It happens in the spirit of the Beatitudes and in accord with the teachings of the Catholic Church. Bills signed into law—or defeated—impact our daily lives. 

Protecting human life, defending religious liberty and preserving traditional marriage and the family, are foundational Catholic principles.  The Catholic Church in Kansas has been and will continue to be at the forefront of these “hot button” issues.  Other concerns, including school choice, healthcare, immigration, and the welfare of the poor, elderly and disabled are always under our watchful eye.

As a husband and father of five children—including a son with Down syndrome and my elderly mother under our care—I hope to bring my own life experiences to bear in working with elected officials.  My experience as a former state legislator will also be helpful.

In the weeks and months ahead please look to the Southwest Kansas Catholic and the Kansas Catholic Conference website and Facebook page for updates and analysis on the issues facing Kansas Catholics.  I promise to communicate with you about what’s happening, including an initiative to make prayer a central theme in all that we do.   Please let me know what is on your mind.

Like a newly ordained priest setting off on a new, exciting journey, your support and prayers will be crucial to the success of our common mission.   It is one thing to win a cultural debate—or even a vote. It is quite another to seek a servant’s temperament, win over a heart and bring someone closer to Our Redeemer. 

Thank you for the privilege of serving you in this way.

 

Chuck Weber resides in Wichita with his family and is a longtime parishioner of the Church of the Resurrection.  He can be contacted by email at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

Cathedral rectory chapel dedicated to Saints Peter and Paul

By TIM WENZL
Southwest Kansas Catholic

The 477th anniversary of Father Juan De Padilla’s “first Mass in Kansas” on June 29, 1541, was celebrated fittingly enough with an outdoor Mass at the parish rectory in Dodge City. Father Wesley Schave, pastor of the Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe, and Father Aneesh Parappanattud, MSFS, parochial vicar, concelebrated. The rectory chapel, here before without a patron, was dedicated to Saints Peter and Paul.

Following the Mass, the congregation was invited into the rectory to view the chapel and tour the priests’ residence. A storyboard inside the residence provided a brief history of the rectory entitled “This Old Catholic House.”

The residence, constructed in 1890, was the home of James M. and Maude Kirkpatrick. The Kirkpatricks belonged to the First Methodist Church. They had six children: two sons and four daughters. Kirkpatrick was an attorney. He served two terms as Ford County Attorney. Toward the end of his career, he limited his practice to abstract and title law.

The house remained in the hands of the Kirkpatrick family until one of the daughters sold the residence to Charles L. Clinton in 1943. Clinton owned the Wholesale Brokerage Company and was a member of the National Candy Wholesale Association. He also served as Mayor of Dodge City from 1951 to 1954.

In 1953, during the pastorate of Msgr. Joseph Grellner, plans were underway to expand Sacred Heart School with additional classrooms, offices, a kitchen and a gymnasium-auditorium.

The nine Sisters of St. Joseph who taught in the school were living in a convent at 907 Central Avenue. This residence needed to be removed to allow room for construction to proceed.

The Clinton home, located just north of the school on Elm Street, was purchased as the new convent for the Sisters on December 31, 1953, for $25,000

The two-story stucco home served the Sisters of St. Joseph as a convent for the next 32 years.

Father Joseph Bahr, pastor from 1984-1988, was looking to purchase a residence near the parish plant and make the rectory space between the church and school available for offices and classrooms.

The two Sisters of St. Joseph in ministry at the school during this time offered the convent to the pastor and his assistant as a rectory.

The Sisters moved to Saint Mary of the Plains College to live in community with the Sisters in ministry on the campus.

This house has served as the rectory for the priests at Sacred Heart Cathedral and now the Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe since 1985.

 

 

 

A summer of love

Totus Tuus, Prayer and Action, bring youth closer to Christ and each other, all while providing a powerful witness

 

By Carleigh Albers
Special to the Catholic

It has been one year since Kade Megaffin last served the Diocese of Dodge City as a summer missionary. Each year was different; one summer he was bouncing from town to town allowing small children to dump chocolate syrup on his head, and the next summer he was whipping out paint buckets to paint stranger’s homes with high school students.

This year? He’s entering as a seminarian for the Diocese of Salina.

“I would not say that the summer mission programs played directly into my discernment, but at the same time, they really did impact my discernment greatly,” Megaffin said as he reflected over his time in southwest Kansas. “There was never really an ‘Aha!’ moment during these programs, but these programs gave me an opportunity to teach the faith (which means I had to learn it), to serve the Church, and to grow immensely in my personal relationship with Christ through the sacraments, prayer, and good virtuous friendships.

“I have now served three summers of mission, two in the Dodge City Diocese and one in the Salina Diocese, and I can say with confidence that my spiritual life grew to a level of strength capable of properly discerning seminary greatly because of these summer mission programs. God only knows where I would be without these summer mission programs.”

Totus Tuus and Prayer and Action have been striving to bring youth to Christ in the Diocese of Dodge City since 2015. The diocese has had 41 young adults serve as team members on the summer missions program. Twenty-seven of the 41 have been natives of the diocese with outsiders serving from Paraguay, Wyoming, Indiana, Nebraska, and neighboring dioceses. There have also been six seminarians who have served on summer missions.

“Summer missions are two programs used for evangelization for people in the Diocese,” said Adam Urban, Director of Youth Ministry for the Catholic Diocese of Dodge City. “It is mission work that brings college students into the diocese. The missionaries get a lot more out of serving than the kids who participate in the programs.” Urban served as a missionary in 2015 and 2016 on the first summers of Prayer and Action.

“Summer missions affected my decision to enter ministry full time,” Urban said. “It was very fulfilling and I knew nothing would fulfill me as much as serving other people. It affected my vocational discernment; working for Prayer and Action that summer introduced me to the diocese and got my foot in the door. I think it is where movement in the church is happening right now.”

The reasons why people serve vary from person to person. 

“I decided to apply for summer missions in the Dodge City Diocese because of the need,” Megaffin said. “I have several friends in and around the diocese and they let me know that Dodge was looking for people to work their summer programs. I almost call Dodge my home. Even though I had spent time in other places, I call Ulysses my hometown. So, working for the diocese was like going back home for the summer.”

Megaffin and Urban aren’t the only young adults who have been deeply affected by serving over the summer. Missionaries have formed deep friendships with those who they serve alongside, while also growing in their faith and developing their prayer.

TOTUS TUUS

Totus Tuus consists of teams made of four college aged students; two men and two women. Each team travels to a different parish within the diocese each week to teach youth about the Eucharist, Marian devotion, vocations, and other topics of the Catholic faith, while infusing high energy and joy into all that they do.

The program originated in Wichita 31 years ago. Last summer the teams reached out to 590 youth. This summer the two teams reached out to 700 youth across the diocese.

A Totus Tuus tradition is that on Fridays, the kids get to end the week with a “human sundae” by picking a teacher to become the “ice cream” that they can pour toppings onto.

“We do it for the kids’ enjoyment,”  said Megan Seamaan, a Nebraska native who served this summer on a Totus Tuus team. “For us, it is a humbling experience to simply sit and allow ourselves to become a human sundae. There is beauty in the mess; sitting there not being able to see because there is chocolate dripping into your eyes, and listening to the laughter, seeing the joy that it brings the kids.... That’s why we do it, for the kids.”

Krysten Brake, a native of Kinsley who served on Totus Tuus in 2017, feels similarly. She served for four summers of Totus Tuus; three with the Diocese of Wichita and one with the Diocese of Dodge City. Brake emphasized the importance of the parish priest being involved with these programs and being a witness.

“The priest has more influence than he knows on the youth,” Brake said. “The priests that are involved in the whole Totus Tuus program throughout the week are the ones that have the most impact. This sounds weird, but I know it has much more impact on me when the priest is willing to put on regular clothes and be involved in the water fight. This shows everyone that priests are human, too, and like to have fun just as much as we all do. Priests have great opportunities to impact everyone throughout the week by saying Mass every day for us, hearing confessions, allowing us to have Adoration, but I think seeing the human side of the priests are some of the most memorable impacts.”

Nick Hernandez, a college student from Hays, learned more about hands-on ministry while serving on Prayer and Action. Prayer and Action is a mission trip designed to serve our neighbors in need. High school students work on painting homes and other various projects while growing in fellowship and diving into the sacraments in a deeper way.

Prayer and Action

Prayer and Action began in 2015 and has since served the communities of Garden City, St. John, Ness City, Meade, Fowler, Jetmore, Scott City, Sublette, and Satanta. This year, there were 51 youth who attended, 14 adult chaperones, and eight college students. They completed 26 projects this summer. 

“The biggest take-away was learning about other people’s stories and hearing how God has been working through their lives to get where they are at right now,” Hernandez said. 

Not only do the missionaries grow in friendship with one another, but also in practicing virtues with one another. For most missionaries, they are searching for an opportunity to grow closer to God.

“Was it worth it to spend my summer in Southwest Kansas? Absolutely!” Seamann exclaimed.

“The environment that comes with these programs will expose your flaws and weaknesses,” Megaffin added. “The beautiful thing about it though, is that you are so close to the sacraments and prayer that you have the opportunity to take it all to God almost immediately. I have personally grown in patience, spiritual endurance, kindness, humility, charity, and more virtues than I probably even realize. Plus these programs have helped to foster in me a deep love for the Dodge City diocese.”

Often, missionaries are recruited through their friends who have previously served for the diocese. Their experiences propel them to desire the same growth for their friends. The missionaries highly recommend college students to serve, but for different reasons.

“I would say to future missionaries to always keep an open mind no matter what mission work you are doing,” Hernandez advised. “Remember to always keep God at the center of your life.”

“I think that summer missions have brought new life to the diocese,” Brake said. “There has always been some youth programs within the diocese, but there has been no change or newness in approach to the youth until recently. The summer missions have been a new and exciting way for the youth to get involved in the diocese and in their personal faith life. Kids from here should serve their own diocese to give the youth an example and to give their own faith experience. The youth in the Diocese need people to share their experiences with their faith and how important faith is.”

“I would recommend serving on the summer mission programs for the Diocese of Dodge City to anyone because I firmly believe there is no greater way for a college aged Catholic to grow in their own faith, lead others in faith, and further the Kingdom of Christ in their own diocese,” Megaffin insisted. “This diocese needs servers and young adults to set the example in both deed and word so that we can rekindle the flames of the Holy Spirit in the hearts of our people. Our summer mission programs are the perfect place to do that.”

 

Applications are currently being accepted for the summer of 2019. If you or someone you know would be interested in serving on summer missions for either Totus Tuus or Prayer and Action, visit www.dcyoungadult.com/summer-missions to learn more or apply today. Check out more on Facebook at www.facebook.com/prayerandactiondcd/ and www.facebook.com/TotusTuusDCD/.

Dead Sea Scrolls foretold the coming of the Son of God

 Editor’s note: This is the second of a series of articles on the Dead Sea Scrolls.

By Charlene Scott-Myers
Southwest Kansas Catholic

One text of the Dead Sea Scrolls, which are 1,000 years older than any other extant manuscripts, specifically is a prophecy of the days to come of Jesus and His teachings.

   Text number 4Q246 reads: 

“He shall be called the Son of the Great [God], and by his name shall he be hailed as the Son of God, and they shall call him Son of the Most High.  (See BAR Magazine, March/April 1990, page 24). 

According to John J. Davis, author of “The Dead Sea Scrolls,” this is the first time that the expression “Son of God” has been found in a Palestinian text outside of the Bible.

A Catholic Dominican priest, Father Roland de Vaux, joined G.L. Harding in excavating Khribet Qumran between 1951 and 1956.

“Evidence from this small village indicates the Dead Sea Scrolls were copied there,” Davis wrote.  “The inhabitants – most likely the Jewish sect known as the Essenes – hid the scrolls in nearby caves when they learned of the approach of the Roman army.”

The hated Romans had ravaged Jerusalem and the many smaller villages in the nearby mountainous areas, but had left the rougher country near the Dead Sea and the high mountain fortress of Masada that was King Herod’s refuge as the last to be attacked and conquered.

(The oldest Hebrew text prior to the 1947 Dead Sea Scroll discoveries was the Ben Asher Text located in Jerusalem and Bethlehem.) 

When they learned of the great monetary value of the Dead Sea Scrolls, Bedouins, archaeologists, scholars, and just plain thieves began to ravage the caves along the northwest shores of the Dead Sea, surely dunking themselves into the murky and sticky sea in the horrible heat, and later selling the scraps (which most of them could neither read nor decipher).

Davis reported that “Expeditions were launched into various valleys or ‘wadis,’ dry creeks or river beds with hills on either side, along the west shore of the Dead Sea,” (where their footprints and mine from visiting there many years later were washed away with the tide.)

A total of 230 caves were explored by archaeologists after the original finds. About 40 of these caves contained pottery and other objects, while 25 caves held pottery of the same type as that found in the original cave.  A dozen or more caves contained manuscript fragments.

My husband Dave and I saw several ancient pots and clay dishes from Israel at the recent scrolls exhibit in Denver.  (The pots and dishes looked almost identical to  Frankoma ware that is created  and sold in Oklahoma!)

One of the larger wadis in Israel is found at Wadi Qumran, which we visited. It is situated next to a site that formerly contained many ruins.  Once thought to be the remains of a Roman fort, this site now is known as Khirbet Qumran or “ruins of Qumran.” 

We walked around and among those ancient stones, whose rooms had been occupied as long ago as the end of the second century B.C. to A.D. 68.  Large stone remains of a long, narrow room were thought to be the dining and prayer room of the monks who had occupied the site and worshipped there, having fled from the Romans when they attacked Jerusalem. 

“A religious community lived at the site from the end of the second century B.C. to A.D. 68,” Davis wrote.  “The Romans had a garrison there between A.D. 68 and 86, and the final occupation at the site was by Jewish insurgents in the second war against Rome (A.D. 132-135).” 

Those last insurgents killed themselves and their families rather than surrender to the Romans and become their slaves for life.

One-fourth of all the scrolls and fragments found in the caves were copies of different books of the Hebrew Old Testament, and every book in the Hebrew canon is represented among the scrolls, except for the book of Esther.

Parts of books such as Deuteronomy, Isaiah, the Minor Prophets or the Psalms were found in more than ten copies.  The Book of Job was written in the normal square Hebrew characters called paleo-Hebrew script, and in Aramaic translation. 

Among the Jews at Qumran, the most popular scripture was the Book of Daniel.

Davis reported that “No fewer than eight manuscripts of the book were found in three different caves.”

“The most spectacular discovery among the Dead Sea caves was a complete scroll of the book of Isaiah in Hebrew that measured 24 feet long,” he added.  “The text of this Old Testament book (about 100 B.C.) was very much like the Ben Asher Text of A.D. 926.

“This fact gave scholars confidence that the translation of the book of Isaiah, which appears in our modern English translations and is based on the Ben Asher text, is a reliable one.”

Surprisingly, Davis revealed something that I never have read previously in my studies of the Dead Sea Scrolls.

“As noteworthy as the Dead Sea finds were in 1947 and following, there is historical evidence that similar scrolls and manuscripts had been discovered in the region much earlier,” Davis wrote.

Bishop Epiphanius of Salamis, fourth century A.D. refers to Old Testament manuscripts in Hebrew and Greek found concealed in clay jars near Jericho in A.D. 217.

Eusebius lived from the third to the fourth century A.D. and referred to the discovery of the manuscripts found in the large jars.

Then in the eighth century A.D., Timothy I, who was the patriarch of the Nestorian Church, recorded the fact that “more than 200 psalms of David” were found near Jericho. 

Here are some more facts that you can file away for future use: three-fourths of the Dead Sea manuscripts include the Apocrypha (14 books in the Greek Septuagint, but not in the Hebrew Canon), the Pseudepiographa (books that were falsely ascribed to Old Testament writers), and commentaries on books of the Old Testament such as Habakkuk, which dates to 25 B.C. – and sadly for readers has had the bottoms of many of its columns eaten away!

The Dead Sea Scroll monks also wrote a rather severe piece of literature called the “Manual of Discipline,” dating back to 100 B.C.  They didn’t seem to care much for women.

The historian Josephus, whom I have quoted many times in other articles, did write about the Essenes, whom he hardly could ignore since at one time there were 4,000 of them living along the northwest shore of the Dead Sea, where I went for a float among the chunks of salt.

Recently it came to light that the head of a Jewish sect had written a letter to a king or priest in 160 B.C. The letter cited 22 matters on which the sect disagreed with mainstream Judaic thought.

So, some scholars now believe the people at Qumran may have been Sadducees rather than Essenes.

 

 

 

 

 

New faces at the Catholic Chancery

Appeal leads to creation of Family Life Office

Janeé Bernal

By Dave Myers
Southwest Kansas Catholic

In the office belonging to Janeé Bernal at the Catholic Chancery in Dodge City, there is a small shelf with few items dedicated to the Beatles.

    With a son named JohnPaul, it’s not uncommon for Bernal, director of the new Diocesan Office of Matrimony, Family Life and Natural Family Planning, to feel the need to mention that, no, he was not named after two of the Fab Four.

“I’m a huge fan of the Beatles,” Bernal admits with a wide smile. “But JohnPaul was named after the pope.”

As if to add his own personal testimony, there is a life-sized cutout of John Paul II standing in a corner of her office.

Bernal, who resides with her husband and three children in Garden City, was hired as a direct result of the generosity of local Catholics through the Vibrant Ministries – Uniting Our Church Appeal. The Most Rev. John B. Brungardt has long felt the need for an office dedicated to the family, and through the kindness of local Catholics, he is seeing it come to fruition.

“We are blessed to have Janeé as director of this important office,” Bishop Brungardt said. “She has the teaching skills, the love of the Lord, and a heart for family life that will serve the diocese well.”

The bishop has dedicated this first year of Bernal’s employment as a year of self-formation, she explained.

“I’ll begin by learning how to serve in this ministry by completing pastoral ministry classes and attending numerous conferences and training sessions.”

It’s a tall order. She’ll be serving in a capacity that would typically utilize a separate person for each ministry. And this is why Bernal will be relying on the kindness – and stewardship -- of strangers.

“The vision is that I will oversee these components -- Matrimony, Family Life and Natural Family Planning,” Bernal explained. “Eventually, I’ll be meeting with the parishes to learn what their specific needs are.  Then I’ll be seeking out and recruiting mentor couples for Natural Family Planning and marriage preparation to teach at their parish.

“Pope Francis said that family is key to re-invigorating our Church,” Bernal added. “We must put the emphasis on the family again. That’s the only way to put families in the pews -- to make sure families are intact. I’ll be finding out what the needs are in the parishes and finding resources to strengthen family life.”

Prior to her hiring, she served for six years as Assistant Professor of Education at the Newman University Western Kansas Outreach Center in Dodge City. Before that, she taught for eight years in public education in Garden City.

She has earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Elementary Education from K-State, and a Master’s Degree in Education with an emphasis on ESOL (English to Speakers of Other Languages) from Fort Hays State University.

It was while attending diocesan youth events such as TEC (Teens Encounter Christ) and high school mission trips that she met her future husband, Jesse, now a Garden City high school teacher.

“I credit [former Diocesan Youth Director] Steve Polley and LeaAnn Scott for us meeting,” she said.

Janeé and Jesse have three children, JohnPaul, 7, Gabriella, 4, both of whom attend St. Dominic School, and Jude, 1. Bernal’s mother and father reside in Great Bend, and she has extended family in Leoti and Marienthal.

She learned about the chancery position after a conversation with her doctor, who lamented the limited availability of NFP programs. He encouraged her to seek ways that she might be of service. This was the same day that the job listing was placed on the diocesan website.

It was a whirlwind experience. After being hired, she was sent to the National Association of Catholic Family Life Ministers in Lafayette, La. There she learned that “there are so many people in other dioceses who are wanting and willing to help. It was so powerful.”

And she learned a second powerful lesson that she will take with her throughout her ministry:

“Two of the keynote speakers, Dr. Greg and Lisa Popcak, said that every single day, every single family should work, play, talk and pray together. It’s so simple. It will strengthen your family.

“I have a teacher’s heart, but a heart for ministry, as well,” Bernal concluded. “So, this is a good mix. I feel very honored to be able to fill this office at the diocesan level after so many years of not having anyone dedicated to this ministry full-time.”

 

 

 

Past Issues

Sept. 16, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: 2018 Golf Classic; student athletes; physically challenged; Leonard Stegman; Lesson in forgiveness; Sending us on a mission

Sept. 2, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Priest crisis; Scandal; Opioid addictions; Seeds of Suicide; Leightons; St. Anne; Vincke; seminarians; Dominican Sisters; Stewardship Conference; Dead Sea Scrolls; PSR programs; Roe V. Wade

 

August 12, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Prayer and Action; Totus Tuus; Janee Bernal; Diana Ramirez; Heidy Ramirez; Bishop Gilmore honored for 20 years ministry; suicide; contraception and abortion; Dead Sea Scrolls; Humanae Vitae; certification in youth ministry; Chuck Weber; Cathedral rectory chapel; Sister Viola Heichelbech; Adam Urban

July 15, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Immigration Protest/Rally; Faith and Light Fiesta; Seeing the Dead Sea Scrolls; Corpus Christi procession; Prayers for priests; Sisters turn 100; Michael Brungardt; Gerald Vincke; Massacre in San Salvador; Action for Alex 

 

June 3, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Parish Pray for Priestly Vocations; Appeal reaches $10 million; Gangs; Seminarians; Pam Willis; Why I like being a priest; Happy Father's Day; Patricia Lujan; Tyler and Rachel Bennett; Adoption Protection Act.

May 20, 2018
KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Track meet; Beloved Sinners; Benjamin Martin retires; Smiles; Future of Fortune Telling; Hoisington mission; DofI; Getting Equipped; Spring Social; First Communion; Confirmation
KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Track meet; Beloved Sinners; Benjamin Martin retires; Smiles; Future of Fortune Telling; Hoisington mission; DofI; Getting Equipped; Spring Social; First Communion; Confirmation

May 6, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Archbishop Romero; Seeing, Touching, Tasting; Exhortation; Father Patrick Conroy; Happy Mother's Day; A child on your doorstep; Vibrant Ministries Grant; From the heart of a young father; Love Gives Life; Roman Holiday; Smartphone; retirement
Fossil Hunting

 

April 15, 2018

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Easter Vigil; Angelica Village; Colorado woman; The art of anger; Cimarron Couple; Staats; Adoption; 

Father Ultan Murphy anniversary; Coughlan; Spiritual Advisor to Hoodlums; Woman of Courage; Oration contest; Darcy Feist  

 

April 1, 2018

 

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Defending Adoption; Led by the Spirit; Knights; ABC Pregnancy Center;
Memorial of Mary; Homeless; Relics; Down syndrome abortion; Chrism Mass

 

March 18, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: SKYAC; Aleksandr Men; Fasting for Priestly Vocations; Uganda; School for deaf; Rannah Evetts; Oberle; Rachel and Doug Trombley; Oscar Romero; Paul VI; DACA

 

 

March 4, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Fasting for priestly vocations; Father Juan; Fasting and prayer;
Quest Weekend 2018; DACA; With God, anything is possible; Homelessness in our communities; Rhubarb, Kansas;
What's the point of fasting; Rite of Election; same-sex couples

 

Feb. 18, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Catholic Schools Week; Rachel Doll; Ellinwood; Great Bend; Garden City; Ness City; Dodge City; Sister Rita Schwarzenberger; Nigeria; Bishop Hermes; Fasting for Priestly Vocations; World Day for Consecrated Life; 50th Anniversary St. Dominic School; What will life be like in 50 years?

 

 

Feb. 4, 2018

 

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: March for Life; Tracy and Ross Smith; Adoption; Vibrant Ministries; Faith and Light;
Pro-Life; Mortal sin to discard elderly; DACA; Abortion; Dreamers; Human Trafficking

 

Jan. 21, 2018

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Louise Korbe; Anne Frank; Miep Gies; Home Heat; Father Solanus

 

Jan. 7, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Good news and kingdom living; dreamers; Sister Teresa Orozco; Infant Adoption; Elderly; a moral conundrum; seminarian; feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe

 

Dec. 17, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Celebrate Christmas 'unplugged'; Msgr. Matthew Smith; Klan; Catholic Charities Annual Appeal; Fr. Larry Rosebaugh; A Guadalupe Encounter; Laci and Joe Salazar; A Christmas Wish; Adoption; Confession; Advent; EWTN; Christmas Blues; Tilma; Pittsburgh; PSR

 

Dec. 3, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: 2017 NCYC; Wheel of Balance; Marita Rother; Stanley Rother; slavery; trafficking; Windthorst water damage; martyred priests; confession; reconciliation; How to go to confession; recipe for codfish cakes; Catholic schools; appeal

 

Nov. 19, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Saints; Father Kola; Black Elk; Giving Tuesday; velvet Elvis; a Slice of Time; Dani Sandoval; Mexican Village; Father Tim Hickey; New faces at chancery; priests share thoughts on confession; Wheel of Balance

 

Nov. 5, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Matrimony Anniversary Mass, 2017; Riebel; Faith and Light; Scripture Day; Sex in the Bible; Quilt, Mexican Village Story; Finance; Fatima pilgrimage; Fowler church window renovation; Medicare; Crazy Glue


Oct. 15, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Father Francis Jordan; Sister Renee Kirmer; Father Rother beatified; religious liberty; RCIA Kansas; V Encuentro; Bishop Weisenburger; Daughters of Isabella; Bishop Gerber Science Center


Oct. 1, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: De Colores; Rebein; Dreamer; Pies; Kellner; Code Quilts; Sister Crucita; Feezor; Formed.org; Sin and pain

 

 Sept. 17, 2017

 

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Sister Lucy Fidelis; Underground Railroad; Sister Irene Hartman; DACA; new priests; teachers; Volunteer of the Year; Golf Classic; St. Francis Xavier; St. Nicholas Parish Center, Kinsley; seminarians; Knights Lite; Stewardship Day 2017

Sept. 3, 2017

Aug. 13, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Coronado Cross; Masada; Moody Gardens; Elders; Rother; undocumented children; cages; year of mercy; Kumi; Hollywood makeup artist; New Mexico; refugee women.

July 16, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Summer camp; tithing and almsgiving; Bill Baalmann; Nathan Schaller; Jubilarian Sisters; Sister Hortencia Rodriguez; Sister Petrona Stockemer; Sister Denise Sevart; Convocation of Catholic Leaders; Mother talks about her son entering seminary; Arcoiris; Youth group travels to Colorado Springs; Major Phillip Roth

June 11, 2017 (Updated)

Ordination; Mark Brantley; Jacob Schneider; Father's Day; Thanks, Dad!; Appeal; Sister Mary Martin Weaver; Bishop Maralit; Budget; Trafficked women; Deacon Michael Brungardt; Dead Sea Scrolls; softball; Father Urban retirement; Sister Kravec retirement; Father Mazouch retirement; Authentic Joy; Pris Climate Accord; Jack Schramm; Pieta.

May 28, 2017 (Updated)

 

Grateful Hearts; MSFS Provincial; Reddy; Reif; Opossum; Dead Sea Scrolls; Our Lady of Fatima; Jorge Herrera, Jr.; Cursillo; Kough; First Communion; Confirmation

May 14, 2017

Esteban Hernandez; citizen; Lilly Ann Rein, Amberly Jimenez, Mother's Day; peacock; Quattrocchi; President Kennedy; Teen Moms; Junior High Youth Rally; Encounter With God's Call; granny/nanny; seniors' contributions; tornado anniversary; harvest; healthcare; Mr. Brown; Store-bought teeth; Louis and Zelie Martin; Father John Sullivan; Irish priest whose prayers could heal; Mexican beauty queen; Esmaralda Gonzalez; religious life

April 30, 2017

   KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Easter Vigil; bully; TEC; Father Marvin Reif; Bet'sie; What makes a hero?; St. Mary of the Plains; tornado

Easter, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: SKYAC; Honorable courtship; footsteps of migrants; CHRISM Mass 2017; honoring priests; Encuentro Cross blessed; Daughters of Isabella State Convention; Fatima pilgrim statue; Mary Sharon Moore interview; Senate advances pro-life measures; love must be at the core of family life; Father John Forkuoh's car story; Confirmations; Sisters of Concordia; CNN hero Father Khalil Jaar

March 26, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: From the heart; kidney; Rother; Friar Carmelo; Schnauzer; Lauren Seachris; Lauren's Treat; fire; Guatemala; immigration; Lenten Regulations 1888; Hot Cross Buns; budget; Trump; Forkuoh; Seiwert; South Sudan; hot ashes

March 12, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Refugees; immigrants; Gilbert Herrman; When you give alms'; Lent; Call to Continuing Conversion, Rite of Election; Charell and Jeremy Owings; adoption; Our Growing Church; Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia; water; creation; Sudan; Darlow Lampe

Feb 26, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Night to shine; Immigration; immigrants; Knights of Columbus; Pete Gomez; this foreign mission; Creole; Robin Doll; Eagle Scout; Quest

Feb 12, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Catholic Schools Week; March for Life; Pro-life; Executive Order; Secular Franciscan Order; teachers; Down Syndrome; Eagle Scout; Bronze Pelican

Jan. 29, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Thank you, religious; SEEK 2017; homeless man to priest; Fourth Sunday; Secret Service to Sacred Heart; Dr. Gerard Brungardt; Martin Luther King; 110 year old nun; Toddler miracle; Letter from undocumented immigrant; health care; immigration

Jan. 15, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Mary helps us share; Tighe donates home to Birthright; Pro-life billboard; Theobald Hattrup; Helen and Steve Eck; Pearl Harbor; Reigning Grace

Dec. 18, 2017

KEYWORDS: Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe, 2016; Pope Francis Christmas schedule; 2016 high school youth rally; Aerospace engineer; Father Stanley Rother; Radio station; Dying girl's letter; Scout nominations; 12 days of Christmas

Dec. 4, 2016

KEYWORDS: Vocations Day; Pope Advent advice; Ex-prostitute; Spearville mission; Pilgrims v. Zombies; Face of God; Mission bazaar; Ness City fall festival; Rural health care; Archbishop Gomez; Bishops congratulate Trump

Nov. 20, 2016

Nov. 6, 2016

Oct. 23, 2016

Oct. 9, 2016


Sept. 25, 2016


Sept. 11, 2016

 
Aug. 7, 2016

July 10, 2016

June 12, 2016

May 29, 2016

May 8, 2016


 April 24, 2016

 April 10, 2016

 March 27, 2016

March 13, 2016

Feb. 28, 2016

 

Feb. 14, 2016


Jan. 31 , 2016

Jan. 17, 2016

Dec. 20, 2015

Dec. 6, 2015

Nov. 15, 2015

Nov. 1, 2015

Oct. 18, 2015

Oct. 4, 2015

Sept. 20, 2015

Sept. 6, 2015

August 9, 2015

July 12, 2015

Jun 14, 2015

May 17, 2015

May 3, 2015

April 19, 2015

Easter, 2015

 

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