Plagiarism by former SKC columnist

Former SKC columnist, Sister Irene Hartman, OP, has been found to have plagiarized at least 25 of the columns she provided to the SKC. For more than a decade, Sister Irene provided dozens of weekly columns under the title “Holy Ones of Our Times,” and the earlier title, “Charisms”.

It has been discovered that at least 25 of her columns were taken in part from the work of Robert Ellsberg, author of All Saints, Blessed Among All Women, and Blessed Among Us (a collected volume of his work that appeared in the publication Give Us This Day).

According to Give Us This Day editor Mary Stommes, a reader recently called their attention to one instance of potential plagiarism, which led to a more careful review and the discovery that, “Sister Irene not only copied many of Mr. Ellsberg’s words, but she also copied his method of expanding our understanding of saintliness in the range and breadth of those portrayed.”

One article reviewed by the SKC contained phrasing identical to that used in a column by Mr. Ellsberg, whose column was written more than a decade prior to Sister Irene’s.  The SKC trusts fully that the research completed by Liturgical Press, the publishing house of Give Us This Day, is accurate. Therefore, the Catholic has removed all of Sister Irene’s columns from our website, including the issues in which they were contained.

“As a 20-year columnist, I would like to offer my personal apologies to Mr. Ellsberg,” said Dave Myers, SKC editor. “I can’t begin to imagine how I would feel had I encountered someone using my columns in such a way. Ms. Stommes and Mr. Ellsberg have been extremely gracious in their response to this serious issue.”

Sister Irene died at age 95 on Aug. 17, 2017. The SKC urges readers to take a moment to view the books written by Mr. Ellsberg, the links of which are included above.  Coverage will appear in the April 7 SKC.

 

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 Call to Continuing Conversion and Rite of Election 2019

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March 24, 2019

March 10, 2019

Mathematical solution to the Sock puzzle

 

   The Dead Sea Scrolls series

 

   St. Nicholas School, Kinsley, Advent Cantata, Dec. 7, 2008

 

   

 

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The Catholic vision of just immigration reform

Editor’s Note: At press time, more than 1,600 immigrant children had been reportedly relocated from shelters and foster care homes throughout the country to a tent camp near El Paso, Tex. 

 

By JD Flynn

Catholic News Agency

Denver, Colo. - A Honduran woman told an attorney back in June that federal immigration authorities took her daughter from her arms as she breastfed the child. When she reached out for her daughter, she says she was handcuffed; she stood powerless as her daughter was taken away.

The woman was in a detention center—a jail—in Texas. She was waiting to be prosecuted for illegal entry into the United States.

Her story is heart-wrenching. It cries out for justice.

Catholics see in every nursing mother an icon of our own mother, the Blessed Virgin Mary, who nursed the infant Jesus at her breast.

We see in the bond between mothers and their children a reminder of the life-giving and nurturing love of God, and the first means through which God’s love brings us into being, guides us, and protects us.

“You drew me forth from the womb,” the Psalmist wrote to the Lord, “made me safe at my mother’s breasts.”

We don’t know what happened after that Honduran girl was taken from her mother’s arms.

We don’t know if she was taken to a warehouse, to be housed with hundreds of other children who had been separated from their immigrant parents. We don’t know if she sat strapped in a car seat, squalling for her mother, near the big kids who let themselves cry only as they fall asleep on gym mats spread across the floor, behind a chain link fence.

We do know that policies that indiscriminately separate children from their migrant parents at our national border violate the sacred sovereignty of families.

But it’s not enough to condemn the treatment of a mother separated from her child without asking what should happen instead. There have been, unfortunately, too few solutions proposed to address a real problem: how should the identity of family members be verified at the border, to ensure that children are not being trafficked? That issue needs more than moralizing or grandstanding. It needs a real solution.

It’s also not enough to call for an end to family separation at the border without asking what led to this humanitarian crisis, and what kind of reforms will really make a difference.

For that reason, no matter how discouraged they are, Catholics need to lead efforts to develop comprehensive immigration reforms rooted in the principles of justice. Only serious reforms, which create a system that protects security and the right to migrate, will end humanitarian crises at the border, mass detentions and deportations, and the deaths of migrants crossing through the desert.

Among the principles of Catholic social teaching are five that seem particularly relevant to just immigration policy: That nations have a right to security; that families have the right to migrate for safety, freedom, or economic opportunity; that justice obliges countries who can receive immigrants without detriment to the welfare of their citizens to do so; that wealthy and stable nations ought to assist unstable and poor countries; and that the family is sacred, sovereign, and prior to the state.

The United States has the right to security: Porous, unsafe, and uncontrolled borders do an injustice to those who cross them, and to our country’s citizens.

The United States also has the right to call on Central and South American countries to reform their economies and to quell the violence and disorder that spurs emigration. The United States has the means, and the obligation, to help those countries work for stability, and to hold them accountable when they do not.

But the United States also has the capacity to receive legally many more immigrants than we do now. We’re facing a labor shortage that won’t be resolved by the restrictive caps and quotas we now place on immigration, or by the byzantine processes that make waiting times for legal migration longer than people’s lifetimes. And importing labor also expands our tax base and our domestic consumer base.

Those benefits outweigh the costs—measured in the provision of social services—associated with increased immigration.

Beyond the economic reasons for making it easier to come to this country are the moral reasons. We are a wealthy and safe nation. Poor people, from poor countries, have the right to migrate for work and security. Our wealth and safety will not be fatally compromised by their arrival. This is not a matter of charity. It is a matter of justice. “The money you have hoarded,” St. Basil the Great wrote in the fourth century, “belongs to the poor.”

In 1948, Pope Pius XII wrote to the bishops of the United States. He said that he was “preoccupied” and following with “anxiety...those who have been forced by revolutions in their own countries, or by unemployment or hunger to leave their homes and live in foreign lands.”

“The natural law itself, no less than devotion to humanity, urges that ways of migration be opened to these people,” the pope wrote. “For the Creator of the universe made all good things primarily for the good of all. Since land everywhere offers the possibility of supporting a large number of people, the sovereignty of the State, although it must be respected, cannot be exaggerated to the point that access to this land is, for inadequate or unjustified reasons, denied to needy and decent people from other nations, provided of course, that the public wealth, considered very carefully, does not forbid this.”

Seventy years later, the pope’s words remain true, and important. The United States needs a program of immigration reform that recognizes our moral obligation to allow broader participation in our economy. Catholics must lead the way toward this reform.

We cannot hoard our prosperity. We cannot exaggerate our national sovereignty. Our land, our jobs, our prosperity itself exists primarily for the good of all. God did not make the land on which we live, or bless the country we call home, so that we could live in comfortable security while those outside our gates suffer violence, chaos, and hunger.

The rule of law matters—it’s not reasonable or safe to expect that law-breaking at the border should continue unabated, or go unnoticed. But the justice of our laws matter too: no one can call for would-be immigrants to follow our nation’s laws without being sure that those laws are just. Our laws, measured against the Church’s criteria, are not just.

Comprehensive immigration reform, though, will be a long-time coming. It will require statesmanship, sober reflection, and serious analysis - these are not things we have come to expect from our national leaders. That both parties have reprehensible records on this matter demonstrates just how difficult our task will be. But we have to work for justice.

In the meantime, we need to insist that the sovereignty of the family is respected. There are times when parents and children should be separated - when parents have been abusive or neglectful, or when they pose a danger to their children or others. Adults who enter this country with children should be scrutinized - for the sake of the children, we should ensure that those adults really are their parents, that the children are not being trafficked or abused. But we need to do this without taking children from the arms of their mothers, or sending toddlers to live in detention facilities.

Using family separation as a deterrent for migration was and is an intolerable and contemptible injustice.

“Jesus, Mary and Joseph,” Pius XII wrote, “living in exile in Egypt to escape the fury of an evil king, are, for all times and all places, the models and protectors of every migrant, alien and refugee of whatever kind who, whether compelled by fear of persecution or by want, is forced to leave his native land, his beloved parents and relatives, his close friends, and to seek a foreign soil.”

Catholics are called to work for justice for the Honduran woman and her daughter, separated during the intimacy of nursing. We’re also called to work for a just system of migration to this country, to be its architects and champions. We are called, like Mary and Joseph, to be protectors of migrants, aliens, and refugees, especially those seeking peace as our neighbors. 

 

Kinsley resident elected to top

International Daughters of Isabella office

By Dave Myers

Southwest Kansas Catholic

KINSLEY — Patricia O’Brien has begun brushing up on her French, an exercise that bears evidence to her having recently received a great honor, not to mention bragging rights for the Catholic Diocese of Dodge City.

At the August convention of the International Circle of the Daughters of Isabella in Montreal, Canada, O’Brien was elected one of only two American International Directors of the 121-year-old charitable group.

“I’m very excited about this new office,” O’Brien said. “It’s a great organization.”

As an International Director, O’Brien will oversee two international committees. The positions requires occasional travel not only across the country, but outside its borders to such places as French speaking Quebec. In fact, O’Brien’s application to run for the office had to be translated into French.

“The farther you move up, the more you need to learn a little French,” she said with a chuckle.

The position will be challenging; it will be rewarding. But the joy of her new elected position will be nothing new to O’Brien; it’s a joy she has experienced since joining the Daughters 25 years ago.

“It’s the friendship and the unique spirit of the people that you meet,” she said. “I love the charity work and get-togethers with people—doing a project for the good of others.”

The motto of the Daughters of Isabella is “Unity, Friendship, Charity.” Their multi-focus includes giving to those in need while offering a strong support base for their own members. 

“I have people ask me how I have the time, but it’s like anything else: you make time for the things that are important. We support the parish, the community, and we do civic work.”

The Daughters are organized by circles, each of which represent a community of members. It may include one parish or several. Each circle picks its own name. Kinsley’s circle is St. John Circle 494, which was founded some 86 years ago. The smaller the number, the older the circle. One of the oldest is the St. Rita Circle in Dodge City, numbered 210. If a circle were to form today, it would be numbered around 1,500.

“Each circle finds its own niche,” its own ways to serve,” O’Brien explained. “The international circle doesn’t say you do this and this. You choose what fits your circle, parish and community.”

Projects of the Kinsley Circle include the “Blessing Box,” a monthly contribution to Catholic Charities to support those in need in our diocese. State-wide, the Daughters maintain a seminary burse in each diocese and support the Knights of Columbus sonogram program.

And there are simple, close-to-home learning projects designed “to last a lifetime”. For example, the Kinsley Daughters recently hosted a program for the public at the St. Nicholas Parish Center on how to bake an apple pie. A simple premise, but one that could be housed firmly in the hearts of the participants for years and years.

Future “Learning for a Lifetime” projects include a session in which an extension agency representative will teach how to balance a check-book. Later, an instructor will teach car maintenance. The workshops are open to all members of the community.

Service is at the heart of the Daughters of Isabella community.

“At our International convention it was announced that organizational wide the Daughters had donated $2,266,477.97 and 2,338,078 hours of service work within the last year,” O’Brien said proudly.

The Daughters of Isabella was formed in 1897 by Father Michael McGivney as an auxiliary to the Knights of Columbus, which he also founded. The organization is no longer an auxiliary, and is an independent entity, O’Brien stressed.

If you think that the Daughters include only middle age or older women, O’Brien is happy to say that a 16-year-old recently joined their ranks in Kinsley. And, of course, there’s O’Brien’s own daughter, Shena, who also joined at 16, a decade ago. “She loves it,” O’Brien with a smile.

“At first when she joined at 16, she said it was like having 30 instant grandmothers,” she added, laughing. “As she’s gotten older, her opinion has matured with her age. There are many women to meet and to do projects with; they are truly a lot of support for a young person. You have people checking in on you, helping to guide your faith and your future.”

And here, O’Brien mentions one other significant bragging right, this time for the people of the state of Kansas.

“Of the hundreds of circles and thousands of members across the United States and Canada, the area with the largest numbers of Circles and members–larger than any other state or Canadian province–is right here in Kansas.”

    For more information on the Daughters of Isabella, visit www.daughtersofisabella.org. (As if to highlight the popularity of Kansas among Circles, the first article on the international DofI website as of Oct. 3 brought to light the efforts of St. Vincent de Paul Circle #211, Spearville, Kansas.)

‘Clay in the hands of the Lord’

Remembering Bishop Gerber

Bishop Eugene J. Gerber was six years a Bishop in Dodge City, twenty-five years a Bishop in Wichita, and seventeen years a Bishop-Emeritus also in Wichita: after almost forty-two years a Bishop, he returned on Saturday to the Father who made him, and the Son who called him, and the Spirit who shaped him. 

That’s the outside of the story, but there is an inside to the story as well.  Some of that inside concerns you, the priests and people of the Diocese of Dodge City.  He wasn’t the same man, you see, when you were through with him in 1982.

He came back to Wichita a changed man.  Those who knew him longest, those who knew him best … they saw it right away, even if they could not quite put their finger on it.  He was just … well … different.

Monsignor John Gilsenan came close to getting at it when he said Bishop Gerber was more reflective somehow, after all he had seen and heard and done in Dodge City. 

He did not rightly know what you did for him.  I do not know now what you did for him, or how you did it.  But you, priests and people of Dodge City, you broadened him, that I do know.  You deepened him.  You molded him into the man who was so widely loved in Wichita and all of southeast Kansas. 

He took delight in his people, the psalmist said.  You helped him treasure that line.  The delight never left him all the days of his life. 

Nor is it any wonder.  From you he learned how to bishop.  The way you responded to him helped deepen him even as he learned.  He hoped that you delighted in him half as much as he delighted in you. 

Because you belonged to the Lord, he came to belong to the Lord, and in ways that surprised him right up to his last days.  He was clay in the hands of the Lord to the very end, because the Lord made him clay in your hands at the very beginning.

 

‘Arcilla en las manos del Señor’

Mons. Eugene J. Gerber fue obispo de Dodge City durante seis años, veinticinco años obispo en Wichita y diecisiete años obispo emérito también en Wichita: Después de casi cuarenta y dos años de obispo, regresó el sábado al Padre que lo creó, al Hijo que lo llamó y al Espíritu que lo formó. 

Ese es el exterior de la historia, pero también hay un interior de la historia.  Parte de eso tiene que ver con ustedes, los sacerdotes y el pueblo de la Diócesis de Dodge City.  No era el mismo hombre, cuando terminó su vida con ustedes en 1982.

Regresó a Wichita cambiado.  Los que lo conocieron por más tiempo, los que lo conocieron mejor... lo vieron enseguida, incluso aunque no pudieran identificarlo.  Solo estaba... digamos... diferente.

Monseñor John Gilsenan estuvo cerca de entenderlo cuando dijo que Mons. Gerber estaba más reflexivo de alguna manera, después de todo lo que había visto, oído y hecho en Dodge City. 

Él no sabía exactamente lo que ustedes le habían hecho.  No sé ahora lo que hicieron por él, o cómo lo hicieron.  Pero ustedes, sacerdotes y pueblo de Dodge City, hicieron de él un hombre más grande, eso sí lo sé.  Lo profundizaron.  Lo transformaron en el hombre que era tan amado en Wichita y en todo el sureste de Kansas. 

Se deleitaba con su pueblo, dijo el salmista.  Ustedes lo ayudaron a apreciar ese versículo.  El deleite nunca le abandonó todos los días de su vida. 

Tampoco es de extrañar.  De ustedes aprendió a ser obispo.  La forma en que ustedes respondieron a él lo ayudó a profundizar incluso mientras aprendía.  Él esperaba que ustedes se deleitaron en él al menos la mitad de lo que él se deleitó en ustedes. 

Debido a que ustedes pertenecían al Señor, él vino a pertenecer al Señor, y de una manera que lo sorprendió hasta sus últimos días.  Él fue arcilla en las manos del Señor hasta el final, porque el Señor lo hizo arcilla en las manos de ustedes desde el principio.

Bishop Eugene J. Gerber; 1931-2018

Good shepherd.  Gentleness.  Inner Peace.  Trust in the Lord.  These phrases come to mind as I think of Bishop Eugene J. Gerber, who died September 29, 2018. 

Bishop Gerber was our third bishop for the Catholic Diocese of Dodge City.  He was appointed by Pope Paul VI, ordained a bishop by Bishop David Maloney, and installed as our bishop, all in late 1976.  In 1982, Bishop Gerber was named by Pope Saint John Paul II to lead the Catholic Diocese of Wichita.  I was ordained a priest by Bishop Gerber 20 years ago in Wichita.

During my episcopal Ordination Mass in 2011, I commented that Bishop Gerber “is a wonderful example of a good shepherd.”  Bishop Gerber’s gentle and compassionate care for his flock was/is a great example for me.  His teaching, care for the hungry, and compassion for the sick were modeled after the Good Shepherd, Jesus.  A few examples:

  • Teaching. Bishop Gerber gave a profound lesson on “The Wheel of Balance,” to us seminarians in the mid-1990s, which I have used ever since, in order to “have life and have it more abundantly” (John 10:10). [Go to dcdiocese.org, scroll to the bottom and click on “wheel of balance”.]
  • Care for the hungry. Bishop Gerber lived in the Cathedral rectory in downtown Wichita for years. He would speak with homeless folks.  Bishop Gerber would make a sandwich for a homeless man who stopped by the rectory.  This was his initial impetus for the Lord’s Diner, which was opened in 2002, and has served over five million meals since.
  • Compassion for the sick. Bishop Gerber, many years ago, was speaking with a priest about retirement. The priest commented: “I have no place to go.”  This planted the seed in Bishop Gerber’s heart for the Priest Retirement Center in Wichita.

Thank you, Bishop Gerber, for your faithful service in the Lord to your flocks in the dioceses of Dodge City and Wichita.  Eternal rest grant unto you.  Thank you, dear Jesus, for the gift of Bishop Eugene J. Gerber.  You love him, and all of us, so much!  

 

Mons. Eugene J. Gerber, obispo - 1931-2018

 

Buen Pastor.  Dulzura.  Paz interior.  Confianza en el Señor.  Estas frases me vienen a la mente cuando pienso en Mons. Eugene J. Gerber, obispo, quien falleció el 29 de septiembre de 2018.

 Mons. Gerber fue nuestro tercer obispo para la Diócesis de Dodge City.  Fue nombrado por el Papa Pablo VI, ordenado obispo por Mons. David Maloney, e instalado como nuestro obispo, todo a fines de 1976.  En 1982, Mons. Gerber fue nombrado por el Papa San Juan Pablo II para dirigir la Diócesis de Wichita.  Yo fui ordenado sacerdote por Mons. Gerber hace 20 años en Wichita.

 Durante mi misa de ordenación episcopal en 2011, comenté que Mons. Gerber “es un maravilloso ejemplo de un buen pastor”.  El cuidado amable y compasivo de Mons. Gerber por su rebaño fue y es un gran ejemplo para mí.  Su enseñanza, el cuidado de los hambrientos y la compasión por los enfermos se inspiraron en el Buen Pastor, Jesús.  Algunos ejemplos:

  • Enseñanza. Mons. Gerber dio una profunda lección sobre “La rueda del equilibrio” a los seminaristas a mediados de la década de 1990, que he usado desde entonces para “que tengan vida, y la tengan en abundancia”(Juan 10, 10). [Buscar la “Rueda del equilibrio” en nuestro sitio web]
  • Cuidado de los hambrientos. Mons. Gerber vivía en la casa parroquial de la catedral en el centro de Wichita durante años. Hablaba con la gente sin hogar.  Mons. Gerber preparó una torta para un hombre sin hogar que se detuvo en la casa parroquial.  Este fue su ímpetu inicial para la Cena del Señor, que se inauguró en 2002 y ha servido más de cinco millones de comidas desde entonces.
  • Compasión por los enfermos. Monseñor Gerber, hace muchos años, hablaba con un sacerdote sobre la jubilación. El sacerdote comentó: “No tengo donde ir”.  Esto plantó una semilla en el corazón de Mons. Gerber, que creó el Centro para Sacerdotes Jubilados en Wichita.

 Gracias, Mons. Gerber, por su fiel servicio en el Señor a sus rebaños en las diócesis de Dodge City y Wichita.  Reciba el descanso eterno.  Gracias, querido Jesús, por el don de Mons. Eugene J. Gerber.  ¡Tú lo amas tanto, y nos amas tanto a nosotros! 

 

+ Obispo John

How a priest and teams of homeless people are transforming Detroit

By Mary Rezac

Detroit, Mich., Sep 12, 2018 / 03:01 am (CNA/EWTN News).- Many homeless people of Detroit already recognize Father Marko Djonovic’s white Ford Excursion.

When Djonovic rolls up with his friend Marcus Cobb, it’s probably because they’ve got a job to offer, in exchange for lunch and some pay.

“Word is getting out on the street about us,” Djonovic said of his new ministry, which he dubbed Better Way Detroit.

“So, when they see the white Ford Excursion they come up to us, asking, are you going to pick us up for work?” he told CNA.

Djonovic and Cobb are the two-man crew behind Better Way Detroit, and since May they have been teaming up with the city of Detroit and willing homeless workers to clean up the city’s parks, overgrown alleys, and vacant lots.

They drive around three days a week, stopping at shelters and other homeless hangouts, offering several hours of work for pay. The van can hold up to six people besides Djonovic and Cobb, and they typically take workers on a first come, first serve basis.

While he never worked with the homeless in any official capacity prior to starting this ministry, Djonovic said he was inspired by the individual interactions he had had with people on the streets.

After helping a mentally ill man get off the streets and into housing, he said he realized that while the homeless agencies are a “well-polished machine, there are gaps in that sometimes they can’t go out on the streets and find people and meet these people.”

He said he also discovered that many of the homeless had a strong work ethic and a desire to work for pay.

“When I see the homeless I don’t see hopeless objects of pity, but I see persons...with a sincere desire to work. They want to work. And there’s a great need in the city of Detroit, so putting those two things together moved me to to do this project,” he said.

Djonovic is also part of the newly-formed Congregation of the Oratory of St. Philip Neri at Our Lady of the Rosary parish in Detroit.

The spirit of service found in St. Philip Neri was an inspiration behind Better Way Detroit, Djonovic said.

“We serve following his spirit,” Djonovic said of the members of the Oratory. That service manifests itself in three ways: evangelization to youth, the cultivation of the spiritual life among the people through the sacraments, and service to the poor.

“I believe it’s what St. Philip would have done, he wasn’t afraid to out on the streets and preach the Gospel, to engage people, which included the homeless. St. Philip Neri was known as the apostle of Rome just because of that,” he said.

In the beginning, Better Way Detroit partnered with the City of Detroit Parks and Recreation Department to clean up parks through their Adopt a Park program. They now also help the city clear out overgrown alleys and vacant lots that can pose safety problems to neighborhoods.

Cobb provides much need insight to the ministry for how to work with the homeless because he was once a homeless veteran himself, Djonovic said.

“I learn a lot from Marcus, he understands the homeless culture; he’s very wise,” Djonovic said. He said Cobb has taught him the importance of being attentive to even the smaller needs of the homeless, such as if they want cigarettes or water, and to let them know they are respected.

Cobb said it helps instill a sense of respect and responsibility to the homeless that they work with if they are given ownership of the projects in which they partake. Every job starts with an evaluation of the site and the work to be done, and the homeless workers decide how best to get the job done, he said.

“You give them ownership, ask them how it should be done. It gives them responsibility,” Cobb said. “We get their input, and before you know it everyone’s teaming up. It makes them feel important, it gets better results, and they put the word out because they know it’s well worth their time.”

Cobb said he believes the ministry has been well-received among the homeless because “it gives them something to look forward to, and a chance to give back, and to get back into society.”

“Just because they’re homeless...doesn’t mean they don’t want to give back or try to get back in to society,” Cobb said.

It also appeals to the homeless because it gives them a chance to provide for some of their own needs “without a handout,” he said.

The partnership with the city, which is significantly understaffed, has also worked well, Cobb and Djonovic said, because their team is often able to get to jobs that the city doesn’t have the staff to do.

For example, the city gets a lot of calls from senior citizens who have lived in their neighborhoods for decades and have safety concerns about overgrown lots that may serve as hideouts or hubs for drug deals, Djonovic said.

“One woman was just singing our praises” after they cleared up a vandalized, overgrown lot in her neighborhood, he said. “Once (lots) are exposed, they feel safer, especially for the sake of children.”

Djonovic said he feels privileged to get to work alongside the homeless, and as they work, “sometimes I get to know their story, and they get to know my story,” he said.

“It’s happened a few times where guys ask me, why did you become a priest?” he said.

Every project concludes with lunch and a reflection on a bible reading. They have also handed out prayer cards to the homeless and do their best to connect them to housing, healthcare services, or other resources they might need.

“We at least just make them aware of the services available and encourage them to go, some guys aren’t aware of (everything available),” Djonovic said.

Djonovic currently funds the ministry entirely out of his own pocket, and through any donations he receives for the project. All of the money goes strictly to needed materials such as gloves or shovels and to pay the homeless for their work.

Djonovic and Cobb added that they are always looking for ways to expand and strengthen their ministry, and they are hoping sometime in the future to employ someone in a full-time position who can oversee the operation to make it more sustainable.

“Things are looking good we’re really enjoying it,” said Djonovic, who added that he’s been touched by some of the responses he’s seen from the homeless.

“One guy said: ‘I feel blessed because to be a part of something positive.’ He didn’t say, 'oh, now I’ve got some money in my pocket',” Djonovic recalled.

“Another young man, 25 years old, he said it was a grace” to participate in the project, he said.

Cobb said he would encourage Catholics to encounter and get to know the poor in their cities.

“Go out and start from the bottom and communicate with the people...go into the areas where the people don’t have the income, and approach them and talk to them halfway nice, and they’ll respond.”

Diocese mourns death of Bishop Gerber, third bishop of diocese

The Most Reverend Eugene J. Gerber, bishop emeritus of Wichita, died Sept. 29. He was 87. Bishop Gerber was the eighth bishop of the Diocese of Wichita (1983 to 2001), and third bishop of the Diocese of Dodge City (1976 – 1983).
The Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated at St. Mary’s Cathedral in Wichita Oct. 9. Bishop Carl Kemme presided. Archbishop Joseph Naumann of Kansas City, Kansas, Bishop John B. Brungardt and Bishop Emeritus Ronald M. Gilmore of Dodge City, and Bishop Gerald Vincke of Salina were among the concelebrating bishops. Bishop Gilmore was the homilist at the vigil; Bishop Kemme was the homilist for the funeral. Interment was at Ascension Cemetery in Wichita.
Eugene Gerber was born April 30, 1931 at a hospital in Kingman, the son of Cornelius J. and Lena (Tiesmeyer) Gerber, members of St. Louis Parish, Waterloo. He took his college studies at Wichita State University and Conception Seminary College in Conception, Mo. He completed philosophy and theology studies at St. Thomas Seminary, Denver. There he received Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts degrees in Religious Education and a Bachelor of Sacred Theology degree.
He was ordained to the priesthood by Bishop Mark K. Carroll at St. Patrick Church, Kingman on May 19, 1959. He served as assistant pastor at St. Anne and Church of the Magdalen parishes in Wichita before being named vice chancellor in 1961.
Father Gerber taught religion at Mt. Carmel Academy from 1961 to 1963 when he was named an assistant at Holy Savior Parish in Wichita. He returned to the Chancery in 1963 as vice chancellor.
The following year he was named an assistant to St. Thomas Aquinas Parish, Wichita, and as assistant to Bishop David M. Maloney. Father Gerber was again named vice chancellor in 1965.
He served as business manager for the Catholic Advance beginning in 1967 and was named an assistant at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception the next year.
In 1973 Father Gerber was named pastor of Church of the Blessed Sacrament in Wichita. He was named chancellor in 1975, while continuing as pastor of Blessed Sacrament.
Several months after his appointment as chancellor in 1975, Bishop Maloney sent him to Rome for post-graduate studies in theology and scripture at the St. Thomas Pontifical University where he earned a Licentiate in Sacred Theology.
In June of 1976, while continuing as chancellor, he was appointed vicar for religious education. From 1969 to 1976, he served on the governing board of Hoy Family Center for the mentally challenged and from 1970 to 1976; he was moderator of the diocesan Cursillo Movement.
He was 45 years of age when he was appointed to serve as the third bishop of the Diocese of Dodge City. Bishop Gerber was ordained to the episcopacy Dec. 14, 1976, by Bishop David Maloney at St. Mary Cathedral, Wichita. Assisting in the ordination were Bishop Marion F. Forst, second bishop of Dodge City, and Bishop Richard Hanifen, auxiliary bishop of Denver. Archbishop Jean Jadot, apostolic delegate, and Cardinal John Carberry, archbishop of St. Louis, presided at the ordination
The following day, installation ceremonies were held in the Civic Center in Dodge City. The installing prelates were Archbishop Jadot and the Most Reverend Ignatius J. Strecker, archbishop of Kansas City in Kansas. Clergy, religious, and laity made up the more than 1,600 persons in attendance.
Bishop Gerber was the first native of Kansas to lead the Dodge City diocese. Under Bishop Gerber’s leadership the ministries continued to grow with the establishment of the Apostolate with Disabled Persons, the Vicariate for Spanish-Speaking, Permanent Diaconate, Aging Ministry, Rural Life Program, RENEW, Vocations Program, Evangelization and the Peace and Justice Office.
On Nov. 23, 1982, after only six years in Dodge City, Bishop Gerber was appointed to lead the Diocese of Wichita. He was installed Feb. 9, 1983, at Century II in Wichita.
Bishop Gerber would serve in his home diocese for nearly 20 years. He resigned at the age of 70 in 2001. The Lord’s Diner, a Wichita food ministry that has served 5 million meals to the poor; the Spiritual Life Center, a retreat and conference facility in Bel Aire; and the Bishop Gerber Science Center at Newman University now stand as living memorials to his life and ministry.
(Additional information on Bishop Gerber’s funeral and remembrances will appear in the next issue of the Catholic.)

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July 15, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Immigration Protest/Rally; Faith and Light Fiesta; Seeing the Dead Sea Scrolls; Corpus Christi procession; Prayers for priests; Sisters turn 100; Michael Brungardt; Gerald Vincke; Massacre in San Salvador; Action for Alex 

 

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KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Track meet; Beloved Sinners; Benjamin Martin retires; Smiles; Future of Fortune Telling; Hoisington mission; DofI; Getting Equipped; Spring Social; First Communion; Confirmation
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May 6, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Archbishop Romero; Seeing, Touching, Tasting; Exhortation; Father Patrick Conroy; Happy Mother's Day; A child on your doorstep; Vibrant Ministries Grant; From the heart of a young father; Love Gives Life; Roman Holiday; Smartphone; retirement
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April 15, 2018

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Easter Vigil; Angelica Village; Colorado woman; The art of anger; Cimarron Couple; Staats; Adoption; 

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 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Defending Adoption; Led by the Spirit; Knights; ABC Pregnancy Center;
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KEYWORDS, PHRASES: SKYAC; Aleksandr Men; Fasting for Priestly Vocations; Uganda; School for deaf; Rannah Evetts; Oberle; Rachel and Doug Trombley; Oscar Romero; Paul VI; DACA

 

 

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KEYWORDS, PHRASES: March for Life; Tracy and Ross Smith; Adoption; Vibrant Ministries; Faith and Light;
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KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Good news and kingdom living; dreamers; Sister Teresa Orozco; Infant Adoption; Elderly; a moral conundrum; seminarian; feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe

 

 

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