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 Oct. 28, 2018

Oct. 14, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Bishop Gerber; Youth Rally; Patricia O'Brien; Daughters of Isabella; Hrencher; just immigration reform; Sister Rose Mary Stein; Janee Bernal; Sex Abuse; Five steps; Catholic Extension; priest and homeless

 

 The Dead Sea Scrolls series

   St. Nicholas School, Kinsley, Advent Cantata, Dec. 7, 2008

 

   

 

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Taking 'Action for Alex'

Honoring a fallen friend by helping others

(See photos here)

By Dave Myers
Southwest Kansas Catholic

KINSLEY — Of this you can be sure: Alex Gleason is smiling down from Heaven.

From June 13-15, dozens of people joined to celebrate the memory of this young man by helping others — a fitting way to honor Gleason, who died two years ago on July 20, and who “always had a smile on his face.”

“Alex was always happy; he was always smiling,” said Caitlin Herrmann, who, with her father, John, started “Action for Alex” last year. Alex was a year ahead of Caitlin at Kinsley High School. 

“Gosh, he was one of the nicest people I knew. He never had a mean thing to say about anyone.”

Gleason died on July 20, 2016. He was 18 years old.

“I was at ‘Prayer and Action’ when I heard about Alex’s death,” Caitlin said.

“Prayer and Action” is a diocesan program for young adults which has them going to the homes of people in need where they beautify the house and property, and help in other unexpected ways.

“That’s where I got the idea for ‘Action for Alex,’” she explained. Unlike “Prayer and Action,” which is diocesan wide, “Action for Alex” is focused in the Kinsley community where Alex was reared.

It is a celebration of the life of one of their own by focusing efforts on the community of which he was a part.

“We worked on one house near St. Nicholas Church,” Caitlin said of the 27 youth volunteers and nearly as many adults. “We painted it, did yard work, took down trees. A family donated a swing and a table set. Another person donated flowers. It looks really nice.”

The homeowner wasn’t content to sit back and watch, noted adult volunteer, Kayla Gleason, whose daughter accompanied Alex to his junior prom. 

“She came out and asked what she could do,” Kayla said of the homeowner. “She helped us to spray paint. Her grandchildren came out and helped, too.

“Alex was very polite, a very nice kid. His whole family is nice.”

When work on the house was completed, the volunteers took their time and talent to the Palace Theater in Kinsley, a jewel on the prairie of southwest Kansas.

Called “...one of the finest examples of shoebox theater design,” the historic theater was constructed in 1917 and still houses original hand-painted fire curtains. One of two such theaters known to exist, the structure is on the National Register of Historic Places.

“We repainted the theater,” Caitlin said. “Because it’s a historic site, we had to match the original color. Jimmy Heinz built a new candy counter. We have a lot of people in town who volunteered to work. I think’s that’s cool.”

The theater shows movies each Friday, Saturday and Sunday. For the current schedule, visit facebook.com/KinsleyPalaceTheatre/.

PRIDE, a Kinsley organization designed to support community projects, donated food, the wood for the theater, as well as paint for the house and glass for the candy counter. Sherwin Williams was “very generous” in the donation of paint. One of the dinners for the volunteers was provided by the Ladies League, while the Knights of Columbus hosted the second night’s dinner. Community volunteers also brought a kiddie-pool/slip-‘n-slide game, which must have felt tremendous after a hot day at work.

“Lots of people gave us snacks,” Caitlin said. “The community really helped out and was real supportive. They wanted to see it happen.”

Martin Gleason, Alex’s father, took part in the work effort as well.

“It was unbelievable what the kids got done in three days; it was truly amazing. We were really happy with the results.”

A 2016 graduate of Kinsley High School, Alex was a member of the Trenton Workers 4-H Club and the Offerle Fire Department. He was working on earning his private pilot’s license at the time of his death.  

“We were very, very proud of him,” Martin said. Alex is also survived by his mother, Jennifer, siblings Brett and Caitlen, grandparents James and Rosanna Gleason and Doug and Saundra McGraw, and many aunts, uncles and cousins.

The event concluded with a community block party, which included a potluck dinner and a powerpoint presentation at the St. Nicholas Parish Hall, featuring the past days’ efforts.

 

 

 

And baby makes … one big happy family!

By Dave Myers
Southwest Kansas Catholic

The baby boy slept peacefully – warm and fed, surrounded by two loving parents and a pug named Doug (who seems to live in a constant state of bliss-seeking) – in the Dodge City living room of Tracy and Ross Smith.

You might remember the couple from a February issue of the SKC. Theirs was one of a series of stories about couples seeking to adopt a child through Catholic Charities of Southwest Kansas Adoption Program.

In April, the prayers of Ross and Tracy and an abundance of friends and family were answered, thanks to a very brave young woman in New Mexico.

“Catholic Charities called us in April and said that there was an expectant mother who had seen our profile,” Tracy said. “We were pretty guarded. We had been presented with possibilities in the past that hadn’t worked out. It didn’t start to feel real until 10 days before we were leaving for New Mexico to meet [our possible] future child.”

Once in New Mexico, they found a young pregnant woman determined to give her child the best life that she could envision. For her, the dog-loving, hard-working, family-oriented, and, most importantly, deeply faith-filled couple from Dodge City couldn’t have been a better choice. She wanted her baby to have a similar upbringing as she’d known.

The birth-mother is originally from Kansas and attended Kansas State University, where Ross and Tracy met. She recently moved to a scenic mountainous region in New Mexico with a population of less than 500 people. And although the three had never met before, it’s a town that just happens to have been the vacation destination of Ross and his family for many years. “It’s a very strong connection,” Ross said. “And it really sealed the deal. It felt like it was meant to be.”

On May 25th, Layton Anthony was born.  “His birth mother had asked us to be there for his birth,” Tracy said. “It was an honor to be there, and a very special experience.”

The couple and the expectant mom even worked together on a name. Layton comes from a special uncle of Ross’s, and Anthony is named after the birth mother’s grandfather, whom she adored.

Because Layton was born outside of Kansas, it took three weeks for the states to clear the red tape that allowed the Smiths to bring little Layton back to Dodge City.

Which also meant that the couple had three weeks to get to know the birth-mom and members of her family.

“We saw her regularly, and continued developing our relationship with her,” Tracy explained. “It was really special for us.”

As one could imagine, the joyful event became quickly bittersweet when the time came to part ways and head back to Kansas.

“It really sunk in,” Tracy said. “and we felt her pain when it came time to head home.”

Thanks to the Catholic Charities of Southwest Kansas open adoption system, the birth-mother and her family will never be cut off from the child, as in days past. She will be akin to a special aunt figure in Layton’s life, Tracy said. In fact, her whole family is now a part of ours, the Smiths said. Something sadly unimaginable in the old days.

“Since we’re family, Layton will know his birth-mom and family,” Ross commented. “He will know that he was loved from the beginning.”

“Layton’s birth-mom was really brave,” Ross added. “She was determined that he would have two loving parents. She never wavered.”

And certainly, it helped the birth-mom to know that little Layton is not lost in the sad mystery of the adoption netherworld of yesteryear, and is instead with two loving parents she’s gotten to know and appreciate well — and with whom, the night before the SKC interview, she shared a face-to-face video chat online.

“To Ross and me, she’s really special. Because of her decision, we became parents. She placed Layton’s needs ahead of her own, even though it was not easy.”

“It was a tough process,” Ross said of the adoption, “but we would do it all over again.”

“Catholic Charities really took care of us,” Tracy added. “We were lucky to have them guiding us through this process. And we feel very blessed to have Layton and his birth family in our lives.”

 

For more information about adoption services at Catholic Charities, contact
Lori Titsworth at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or by phone at 620-792-1393.

 

Urging prayer, pressing for action

Diocese joins thousands across country in raising voices for separated families

(PHOTOS from the Rally)

By Dave Myers
Southwest Kansas Catholic

It was an appeal to the better angels of our nature, an urging that more than 3,000 immigrant families who have been forcefully separated at the border in recent months be quickly and safely reunited.

On June 30, dozens of people gathered in a grassy, tree-lined area next to the Dodge City Medical Center to voice their opposition to family separations, to urge those in power to expedite the rejoining immigrant families, and to pray for the families affected and the policy-makers.

It was one of scores of rallies that took place across the country.

“As people of faith, we know that we must speak and act on behalf of those who have no voice,” said Georgina Paz, an employee of the Catholic Diocese of Dodge City, and one of the organizers of the event. “Every person has a fundamental right to life and dignity. We believe every person is precious.”

The rally was organized by the Catholic Diocese of Dodge City with the support of the First United Methodist Church of Dodge City and St. Catherine Hospital. Speakers included Rev. Jerre Nolte of First United Methodist Church, who gave the invocation, Rev. Juan Espinoza, also of First United Methodist Church, and Father Robert Schremmer, vicar general of the Catholic Diocese.

Dennis McKinney, former Kansas State Treasurer, gave a particularly impassioned address:

“… I think the vast majority of us agree that our country has to do things to protect us from violence and acts of terrorism,” McKinney said. “We have to have a secure border. We have to have a conversation about how we bolster other nations so that people don’t have to flee here. It’s essential to understand that safety and security can be achieved.”

But it must be achieved, he said, without separating families and violating our most basic values and traditions.

“I think we’re alarmed because we see our nation ... taking children away from their parents. … And these actions are being taken against people, many of whom have been fleeing some of the most dire circumstances known.”

 McKinney continued: “…In the 9th chapter of Luke, Jesus reminds us that the greatest commandment is to love God with all of our heart, with all of our soul, with all of our mind, with all of our strength, and the that the second greatest commandment is to love our neighbor as ourselves.

“…It’s imperative that we shout from the highest rooftop the words that God gives us from the apostle John: If you do not love, you do not know God, because God is love.”

Rev. Nolte prayed that God would “turn our eyes to the other that we may see you, and see you in our neighbor.

“Help us to see each other as beloved children, eternally with you,” he said. “Turn our ears to the other that we may hear their cries as you hear ours—with compassion, and tenderness that draws us closer in the midst of suffering. Help us to hear the other as your beloved child. … And Lord, turn our hearts to you and to the other, that those things that might divide are abandoned….”

Before praying a litany of intercession, Rev. Esponiza said, “As people of God, it’s our responsibility to seek justice for our neighbors….”

As cars zoomed by on Central Ave., David McHugh, youth minister at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe in Dodge City, and Diane Ramirez, performed “God Bless America,” and the “Prayer of St. Francis,” their voices booming across loud speakers.

Many people sat in the shade on lounge chairs, while others stood throughout the gathering, at times breaking into applause.

Coleen Stein of the Catholic diocese offered a stark reminder of the vision of America’s founders when she recited “The New Colossus,” the poem written by Emma Lazarus in 1883 that is emblazoned on the Statue of Liberty. 

The closing song became at once a song of hope as well as a tribute to a day that drew together young and old, and people of various races and religions. After the benediction by Father Schremmer, everyone stood and joined in singing “America the Beautiful.”

Scores of faithful process 3.5 miles through Dodge City, providing

A powerful witness to the ‘Body of Christ’

(PHOTOS from the Procession)

By DAVE MYERS
Southwest Kansas Catholic

Some 200 to 300 people — children, moms pushing baby carriages, youth and elderly — celebrated the Feast of Corpus Christi June 3 with a 3.5-mile procession through the streets of Dodge City.

The procession began at Sacred Heart Cathedral and concluded at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe.

It was at once a prayer for priestly vocations, for women and men religious, families and youth, for conversion, and a prayer for world peace.

But perhaps most importantly, it was a witness of the Body and community of Christ to a multitude of people who sat outside their homes or parked along the road to view the impressive sight.

In the lead was a pickup truck packed with singers led by Cathedral youth director and recording artist David McHugh, whose powerful voice echoed through the streets.

Another truck pulled a makeshift altar on which a different priest prayed before the Blessed Sacrament between each of five prayer services.

The five altars were set up in public view along the route, such as in front of the Dodge City Medical Center and the parking lot of a mall.

Bishop John Brungardt rode the final leg of the journey, concluding at the cathedral with a prayer service in Spanish and English.

Entre 200 y 300 personas (niños, mamás empujando sus carritos de bebé, jóvenes y ancianos) celebraron la Fiesta de Corpus Christi el 3 de junio con una procesión de 3,5 millas por las calles de Dodge City.
La procesión comenzó en la Catedral del Sagrado Corazón y concluyó en la Catedral de Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe.
Fue a la vez una oración por las vocaciones sacerdotales; por los religiosos y religiosas; las familias y los jóvenes; por la conversión; y una oración por la paz mundial.
Pero quizás lo más importante, fue un testimonio del Cuerpo y la comunidad de Cristo ante una multitud de personas que se sentaron afuera de sus casas o estacionaron a lo largo del camino para apreciar esta vista impresionante.
A la cabeza estaba una camioneta llena de cantantes dirigidos por el director juvenil de la Catedral y artista de grabación David McHugh, cuya poderosa voz resonó por las calles.
Otro camión sacó un altar improvisado en el que un sacerdote diferente rezaba ante el Santísimo Sacramento entre cada uno de los cinco servicios de oración.
Los cinco altares se colocaron a la vista del público a lo largo de la ruta, como frente al Dodge City Medical Center y el estacionamiento de un centro comercial.
El obispo, Mons. John Brungardt montó la última etapa del viaje, concluyendo en la catedral con un servicio de oración en español e inglés.

On suicide and surviving the storm

By DAVE MYERS
Southwest Kansas Catholic

This advice came from my wife, Charlene, before we were married: “Despair,” she said, “always lifts.”

I’ve had to remember this from time to time when the bluesman has come to call, taking me into that deep, dark well.

“Despair ALWAYS lifts.”

Earlier this year, two issues of the SKC contained back to back obituaries for young people who had taken their own lives. And Alex Gleason, Page 13 in this issue, a fine young man, left his family and friends agonizing as to the “Why?”.

Everyone is wired differently, affected in their own deeply personal, and totally unique way, by the world around them. It is impossible to fully comprehend the uniqueness of the depths of each person’s emotional well, which is why it is equally impossible to fully surmise why someone might choose to end their own life. It is a depth which we cannot fathom.

Sometimes, of course, the answer is apparent. It is a rash decision housed in despair that (if only they had known!) would have lifted, eventually.

The Catholic Church understands that deep depths of anguish can diminish responsibility of those who take their own lives. The Church offers Mass for the repose of the soul of a suicide victim, “invoking God’s tender love and mercy, and His healing grace for the grieving loved ones.”

The Catholic Church assures us that God alone is left to judge the state of one’s heart and mind at death.

“Despair ALWAYS lifts!”

Several years ago I found myself in the deepest depth of despair I had ever experienced before or since, due to a loved one’s illness. I prayed, but the depth didn’t decrease. Depression gave way to a panic-state. I could have and should have called a help-line. I needed help. Badly.

Fortunately, today, here I sit at my computer drinking coffee and trying to share some words of comfort with others. Time, I realize, was the gift God gave me that night. I just needed time to get through the storm. Despair lifted, just as Charlene said it would.

The storms can be unfair. They can be damaging, physically and emotionally. They can blind us to any sort of reprieve. They can be so unbelievably harsh.

In my experience, the best solution for calming the storm is to talk. If you don’t feel comfortable turning to family or friends, call 1-800-273-TALK. And in the meantime, never, ever forget:

“Despair ALWAYS lifts!”

What can we do for others? All of us must embrace the notion that many people we encounter are carrying a great burden, and that they must be treated with compassion. We must practice constant empathy, reaching out to each other in as Christ-like a way as possible. We have to fight the nationalized hate that has come to the fore. Hate for others breeds hate for oneself, and visa versa.

If you find yourself with someone deep in the depths of despair, LISTEN to them. When I was deep in that well, I called a friend who talked. And talked. And talked! I needed to talk, not to be talked to. His words were a blur. Try as he might to help, he might as well have been reciting a recipe for lasagna.

We have to laugh; we have to celebrate. We need to teach one another not to take life too seriously. We must remind each other we are all in this together, brothers and sisters—family—children of a loving God.

 

Eucharist as a Sacred Meal

By FATHER TED STOECKLEIN
Assistant Director, Office of Priestly Vocations

From the beginning of creation, human beings were designed to live in an easy unity and fellowship with God and all creation. Sin shatters this experience of unity. It divides and scatters us. Yet God does not want to leave us in this lonely, alienated and ultimately deadly state. God, throughout history, set forth a plan to gather us back to himself. Part of this story of reunifying us to himself takes place with the development of “Sacred Meal”.

As the story goes, in the garden, God created everything good and God intended to feed his creatures with all that was good. God offered an abundance of food to share, to enjoy and to make humans flourish. But instead of being content to receive what God offered, Adam and Eve grasped for what was not given to them. This fall from grace is described as an action of disobedience by eating “forbidden fruit.” This temptation and fall dealt death instead of life.

Throughout the Old Testament, stories illustrating hospitality and meals shared consistently accompanied God’s saving action. From Abraham and Sarah encountering the three men on their way to Sodom and Gomorrah, to the yearly celebration to the Passover, the practice of sacred meal grew up and came to fruition at the Last Supper.

In the 25th chapter of Isaiah the Lord makes this promise:

“On this mountain the Lord of hosts will provide for all peoples; a feast of rich food and choice wines, juicy, rich food and pure, choice wines… He will destroy death forever.”

Though brought about through the tribes of Israel, the promise is given to all people. God promises to gather all human beings back into right worship and right relationship with God.

The meal that is given in the event of Passover is primary in development of sacred meal. The Passover meal was a recovery (however imperfect) of the easy unity and fellowship of the Garden of Eden. It was God hosting a banquet at which his human creatures share life with him and each other. God established the Passover meal as a sign of his covenant with his people Israel and as a prefiguring of the Eucharistic feast. In the fullness of time, Jesus gathered his apostles around the Passover table and instituted the Eucharist at the Last Supper.

Not limited to, but including the feast of the Passover, in the New Testament many meals with Jesus described the elements of this restoration of life with God. From the feeding of the multitudes, to dining with Pharisees, to dining with Martha and Mary...these meals were shared with sinners and saints, sick and healthy. Those who dined with Jesus represented many of the intensely divided groups of people at that time. The meals shared with Jesus were marked with themes of abundance, healing for the sick, forgiveness and reconciliation for sinners. These meals tell the story of God gathering back to himself all who had been scattered.

I am embarrassed to admit that until recent years I had been woefully ignorant of the Eucharist as sacred meal. I’m sure they covered this stuff in seminary, but in all honesty, it did not resound with me at that time.

I remember taking part in a workshop about 15 years ago. The presenter of the workshop instructed us to draw or describe what a typical meal was like in our homes growing up. The people at my table described details such as the shape of table, who sat where, how the table was set, how the food was distributed, and what kinds of conversations were shared. I remember them having a good time reminiscing about their childhood dining experiences. I also remember looking at my blank paper. Honestly the only image that came to my mind was sitting in front of the TV after school eating Fruit Loops and watching Gilligan’s Island.

The way we live our home lives has an enormous impact on the way we experience Eucharist. One thing I have begun to encourage families to do is to commit to having at least one meal per week together. No electronics, no newspapers or other distractions…look each other in the eye and talk to each other. Explore creative ways to interact with your family. Find something that works for you and don’t forget to enjoy it. Hopefully these “sacred meals” will in some small way carry over to your celebrating The Sacred Meal, the Eucharist.

 

Past Issues

Sept. 16, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: 2018 Golf Classic; student athletes; physically challenged; Leonard Stegman; Lesson in forgiveness; Sending us on a mission

Sept. 2, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Priest crisis; Scandal; Opioid addictions; Seeds of Suicide; Leightons; St. Anne; Vincke; seminarians; Dominican Sisters; Stewardship Conference; Dead Sea Scrolls; PSR programs; Roe V. Wade

 

August 12, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Prayer and Action; Totus Tuus; Janee Bernal; Diana Ramirez; Heidy Ramirez; Bishop Gilmore honored for 20 years ministry; suicide; contraception and abortion; Dead Sea Scrolls; Humanae Vitae; certification in youth ministry; Chuck Weber; Cathedral rectory chapel; Sister Viola Heichelbech; Adam Urban

July 15, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Immigration Protest/Rally; Faith and Light Fiesta; Seeing the Dead Sea Scrolls; Corpus Christi procession; Prayers for priests; Sisters turn 100; Michael Brungardt; Gerald Vincke; Massacre in San Salvador; Action for Alex 

 

June 3, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Parish Pray for Priestly Vocations; Appeal reaches $10 million; Gangs; Seminarians; Pam Willis; Why I like being a priest; Happy Father's Day; Patricia Lujan; Tyler and Rachel Bennett; Adoption Protection Act.

May 20, 2018
KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Track meet; Beloved Sinners; Benjamin Martin retires; Smiles; Future of Fortune Telling; Hoisington mission; DofI; Getting Equipped; Spring Social; First Communion; Confirmation
KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Track meet; Beloved Sinners; Benjamin Martin retires; Smiles; Future of Fortune Telling; Hoisington mission; DofI; Getting Equipped; Spring Social; First Communion; Confirmation

May 6, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Archbishop Romero; Seeing, Touching, Tasting; Exhortation; Father Patrick Conroy; Happy Mother's Day; A child on your doorstep; Vibrant Ministries Grant; From the heart of a young father; Love Gives Life; Roman Holiday; Smartphone; retirement
Fossil Hunting

 

April 15, 2018

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Easter Vigil; Angelica Village; Colorado woman; The art of anger; Cimarron Couple; Staats; Adoption; 

Father Ultan Murphy anniversary; Coughlan; Spiritual Advisor to Hoodlums; Woman of Courage; Oration contest; Darcy Feist  

 

April 1, 2018

 

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Defending Adoption; Led by the Spirit; Knights; ABC Pregnancy Center;
Memorial of Mary; Homeless; Relics; Down syndrome abortion; Chrism Mass

 

March 18, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: SKYAC; Aleksandr Men; Fasting for Priestly Vocations; Uganda; School for deaf; Rannah Evetts; Oberle; Rachel and Doug Trombley; Oscar Romero; Paul VI; DACA

 

 

March 4, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Fasting for priestly vocations; Father Juan; Fasting and prayer;
Quest Weekend 2018; DACA; With God, anything is possible; Homelessness in our communities; Rhubarb, Kansas;
What's the point of fasting; Rite of Election; same-sex couples

 

Feb. 18, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Catholic Schools Week; Rachel Doll; Ellinwood; Great Bend; Garden City; Ness City; Dodge City; Sister Rita Schwarzenberger; Nigeria; Bishop Hermes; Fasting for Priestly Vocations; World Day for Consecrated Life; 50th Anniversary St. Dominic School; What will life be like in 50 years?

 

 

Feb. 4, 2018

 

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: March for Life; Tracy and Ross Smith; Adoption; Vibrant Ministries; Faith and Light;
Pro-Life; Mortal sin to discard elderly; DACA; Abortion; Dreamers; Human Trafficking

 

Jan. 21, 2018

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Louise Korbe; Anne Frank; Miep Gies; Home Heat; Father Solanus

 

Jan. 7, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Good news and kingdom living; dreamers; Sister Teresa Orozco; Infant Adoption; Elderly; a moral conundrum; seminarian; feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe

 

Dec. 17, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Celebrate Christmas 'unplugged'; Msgr. Matthew Smith; Klan; Catholic Charities Annual Appeal; Fr. Larry Rosebaugh; A Guadalupe Encounter; Laci and Joe Salazar; A Christmas Wish; Adoption; Confession; Advent; EWTN; Christmas Blues; Tilma; Pittsburgh; PSR

 

Dec. 3, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: 2017 NCYC; Wheel of Balance; Marita Rother; Stanley Rother; slavery; trafficking; Windthorst water damage; martyred priests; confession; reconciliation; How to go to confession; recipe for codfish cakes; Catholic schools; appeal

 

Nov. 19, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Saints; Father Kola; Black Elk; Giving Tuesday; velvet Elvis; a Slice of Time; Dani Sandoval; Mexican Village; Father Tim Hickey; New faces at chancery; priests share thoughts on confession; Wheel of Balance

 

Nov. 5, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Matrimony Anniversary Mass, 2017; Riebel; Faith and Light; Scripture Day; Sex in the Bible; Quilt, Mexican Village Story; Finance; Fatima pilgrimage; Fowler church window renovation; Medicare; Crazy Glue


Oct. 15, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Father Francis Jordan; Sister Renee Kirmer; Father Rother beatified; religious liberty; RCIA Kansas; V Encuentro; Bishop Weisenburger; Daughters of Isabella; Bishop Gerber Science Center


Oct. 1, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: De Colores; Rebein; Dreamer; Pies; Kellner; Code Quilts; Sister Crucita; Feezor; Formed.org; Sin and pain

 

 Sept. 17, 2017

 

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Sister Lucy Fidelis; Underground Railroad; Sister Irene Hartman; DACA; new priests; teachers; Volunteer of the Year; Golf Classic; St. Francis Xavier; St. Nicholas Parish Center, Kinsley; seminarians; Knights Lite; Stewardship Day 2017

Sept. 3, 2017

Aug. 13, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Coronado Cross; Masada; Moody Gardens; Elders; Rother; undocumented children; cages; year of mercy; Kumi; Hollywood makeup artist; New Mexico; refugee women.

July 16, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Summer camp; tithing and almsgiving; Bill Baalmann; Nathan Schaller; Jubilarian Sisters; Sister Hortencia Rodriguez; Sister Petrona Stockemer; Sister Denise Sevart; Convocation of Catholic Leaders; Mother talks about her son entering seminary; Arcoiris; Youth group travels to Colorado Springs; Major Phillip Roth

June 11, 2017 (Updated)

Ordination; Mark Brantley; Jacob Schneider; Father's Day; Thanks, Dad!; Appeal; Sister Mary Martin Weaver; Bishop Maralit; Budget; Trafficked women; Deacon Michael Brungardt; Dead Sea Scrolls; softball; Father Urban retirement; Sister Kravec retirement; Father Mazouch retirement; Authentic Joy; Pris Climate Accord; Jack Schramm; Pieta.

May 28, 2017 (Updated)

 

Grateful Hearts; MSFS Provincial; Reddy; Reif; Opossum; Dead Sea Scrolls; Our Lady of Fatima; Jorge Herrera, Jr.; Cursillo; Kough; First Communion; Confirmation

May 14, 2017

Esteban Hernandez; citizen; Lilly Ann Rein, Amberly Jimenez, Mother's Day; peacock; Quattrocchi; President Kennedy; Teen Moms; Junior High Youth Rally; Encounter With God's Call; granny/nanny; seniors' contributions; tornado anniversary; harvest; healthcare; Mr. Brown; Store-bought teeth; Louis and Zelie Martin; Father John Sullivan; Irish priest whose prayers could heal; Mexican beauty queen; Esmaralda Gonzalez; religious life

April 30, 2017

   KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Easter Vigil; bully; TEC; Father Marvin Reif; Bet'sie; What makes a hero?; St. Mary of the Plains; tornado

Easter, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: SKYAC; Honorable courtship; footsteps of migrants; CHRISM Mass 2017; honoring priests; Encuentro Cross blessed; Daughters of Isabella State Convention; Fatima pilgrim statue; Mary Sharon Moore interview; Senate advances pro-life measures; love must be at the core of family life; Father John Forkuoh's car story; Confirmations; Sisters of Concordia; CNN hero Father Khalil Jaar

March 26, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: From the heart; kidney; Rother; Friar Carmelo; Schnauzer; Lauren Seachris; Lauren's Treat; fire; Guatemala; immigration; Lenten Regulations 1888; Hot Cross Buns; budget; Trump; Forkuoh; Seiwert; South Sudan; hot ashes

March 12, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Refugees; immigrants; Gilbert Herrman; When you give alms'; Lent; Call to Continuing Conversion, Rite of Election; Charell and Jeremy Owings; adoption; Our Growing Church; Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia; water; creation; Sudan; Darlow Lampe

Feb 26, 2017

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Night to shine; Immigration; immigrants; Knights of Columbus; Pete Gomez; this foreign mission; Creole; Robin Doll; Eagle Scout; Quest

Feb 12, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Catholic Schools Week; March for Life; Pro-life; Executive Order; Secular Franciscan Order; teachers; Down Syndrome; Eagle Scout; Bronze Pelican

Jan. 29, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Thank you, religious; SEEK 2017; homeless man to priest; Fourth Sunday; Secret Service to Sacred Heart; Dr. Gerard Brungardt; Martin Luther King; 110 year old nun; Toddler miracle; Letter from undocumented immigrant; health care; immigration

Jan. 15, 2017

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Mary helps us share; Tighe donates home to Birthright; Pro-life billboard; Theobald Hattrup; Helen and Steve Eck; Pearl Harbor; Reigning Grace

Dec. 18, 2017

KEYWORDS: Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe, 2016; Pope Francis Christmas schedule; 2016 high school youth rally; Aerospace engineer; Father Stanley Rother; Radio station; Dying girl's letter; Scout nominations; 12 days of Christmas

Dec. 4, 2016

KEYWORDS: Vocations Day; Pope Advent advice; Ex-prostitute; Spearville mission; Pilgrims v. Zombies; Face of God; Mission bazaar; Ness City fall festival; Rural health care; Archbishop Gomez; Bishops congratulate Trump

Nov. 20, 2016

Nov. 6, 2016

Oct. 23, 2016

Oct. 9, 2016


Sept. 25, 2016


Sept. 11, 2016

 
Aug. 7, 2016

July 10, 2016

June 12, 2016

May 29, 2016

May 8, 2016


 April 24, 2016

 April 10, 2016

 March 27, 2016

March 13, 2016

Feb. 28, 2016

 

Feb. 14, 2016


Jan. 31 , 2016

Jan. 17, 2016

Dec. 20, 2015

Dec. 6, 2015

Nov. 15, 2015

Nov. 1, 2015

Oct. 18, 2015

Oct. 4, 2015

Sept. 20, 2015

Sept. 6, 2015

August 9, 2015

July 12, 2015

Jun 14, 2015

May 17, 2015

May 3, 2015

April 19, 2015

Easter, 2015

 

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