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Stewardship Conference:

Injecting God’s love into lives of student athletes

By DAVE MYERS

Southwest Kansas Catholic

Editor’s Note: The following is one of a series of articles that includes topics presented at the Aug. 25 Stewardship Conference in Dodge City. The Stewardship Conference, organized by Director of Stewardship, Eric Haselhorst, presents ways for participants to be better equipped to serve the Lord and each other. Complete lists of hand-outs from Stewardship Day can be found at dcdiocese.org/stewardship/stewardship-day.

 

For Dodge City High School teacher Taviana Lowery, one word brings with it a God-given answer to injecting the love of Christ back into the lives of young people: discipleship.

At the annual Stewardship Conference, Aug. 25 at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe, Lowery addressed, “How to be a disciple while coaching.” It was a discussion ultimately pertaining to all students, not only student athletes.

Lowery is starting her 14th year as a teacher at the high school, instructing students from many corners of the globe how to speak English.

“Discipleship in a public-school setting is tricky,” she said, “but it doesn’t have to be nonexistent. There are many ways we can be disciples to our young people without offending anyone. I can go to my son’s team and pray with them.”

When an audience member asked if she had ever been taken to task for praying with the youth, she replied, “I’ve never gotten grief for praying with kids. Only thanks.”

 “I’m a teacher. I see so much hurt. Poverty. Abuse. Youth who feel very worthless.” [Dodge City High School lost two young people to suicide earlier in the year.]

Yet, she adds, “I am amazed how God has turned so much tragedy into something so beautiful. I’ve seen so many in the community reaching out asking how to help.

“As parents, we have a tremendous amount of power,” she said. “You have an influence on your children; they can see the love of Christ in you. That’s discipleship. That is your mission.”

And coaches? “Coaches have a tremendous amount of influence over their student athletes.

“You have the power to disciple in a way that’s free from many of the restraints of the school setting. Maybe we’re not taking advantage. Are we focusing on baseball and only baseball, or are we focusing on something bigger?”

As a member of the worldwide Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Lowery has seen how Christianity in an athletic setting can affect youth.

“If they could just see how much He loves them, they’d be okay. They don’t know God loves them, that He’s there for them.

“I hope you will think about how you can reach out to our youth, because they are hurting. Today’s world is very broken. Our youth are dealing with things they should never have to deal with. I have a passion for Church and a passion for kids.

“Discipleship is a very personal decision and mission,” she said. “I tell my children, ‘Whatever you decide to do is your mission from Christ.’ If we want to share the love of Jesus Christ and be a disciple, He will guide us.”

 

 

 

 

 

PSR programs benefitting from home-grown generosity

By DAVE MYERS

Southwest Kansas Catholic

Thanks to the generosity of Catholics across the diocese and beyond, thousands of dollars from the Vibrant Ministries – Uniting Our Church Appeal have already been dispersed to local parishes for use in their Parish School of Religion (PSR), youth programs, and other faith formation programs.

This includes funding for such items as computers, projectors and televisions, computer equipment for video production, wireless interface, computer programs and videos, scholarships and Bibles.

  At the heart of the Appeal grants is the desire of the diocese to educate and empower the educators.

VIDEOS FOR TEENS, RANSOM

Denise Flax spoke to the Catholic from the playground where she is a kindergarten and first grade teacher. The junior and senior high PSR teacher will be using the Appeal funding to spread the word of God to young people through videos made by young people.

“We’re really excited,” Flax said amid the sounds of children at recess. “We are making apologetic videos for teens. [Apologetics is the “science of explaining the Catholic Faith in a rational and reasonable manner with love and patience.”]

“What we’re wanting to do is to reach as many teens as possible. We’re making and posting on Youtube and social media to reach kids, making them stronger and more knowledgeable about their faith, so they will be able to answer questions or respond to attacks about their faith.”

Up until now, Flax and her class have been using an iPhone for video production, which resulted in one video called, “What is Apologetics?” The ability to utilize better equipment will enhance the video production and the final result, Flax said, which will ultimately attract more young people to the videos.

 “The kids are so excited about it, but by the end of class I’m exhausted,” she said with a laugh. Making even a five-minute video can take a great deal of effort, including hours and hours of editing.

“It’s a huge project. I’m sort of like a referee. We have a curriculum that we use; we read and learn concepts. Some kids have an idea and get up and act it out. I say if it sounds good, whether it needs tweaking, or ‘we aren’t going to go down that road,’” Flax said with another laugh.

“They’re fun to make,” she added. “There’s a lot of humor.”

Flax didn’t receive the amount of funding that was requested in her grant application – a decision left to the money crunchers -- but it was “a good chunk” that will go toward the purchase of a new computer, video camera, software, a boom mic for better sound, and lighting. She admitted that the class will be doing a bit of fund-raising in order to get all the equipment they need, but she stressed that she appreciates every bit of funding from the Appeal that she received.

At the annual Stewardship Conference Aug. 25, Flax and members of her class provided a workshop on video production for PSR classes. (See pages 14-15.)

FAITH FORMATION, LIBERAL

St. Anthony Parish in Liberal benefited from the generosity of the people of the diocese via grants to several of their faith formation programs. St. Anthony, one of the larger parishes in the diocese with nearly 2,000 registered families (and many unregistered), received financial gifts for programs including adult formation (DVDs and materials), adult evangelization (Christlife program), PSR Catechist Coaching (outside speakers and manuals), youth and young adult (summer daycare program), RCIA (educational videos), and three Pastoral Ministry Formation scholarships at approximately $500 each.

One of the great blessings of the funding is the education of catechists.

“I think it is a much needed and great thing that these funds are being made available,” said Dan Diepenbrock, St. Anthony Parish Manager. “We have in our parish almost 50 dedicated catechists who volunteer their time at least once every week, sometimes twice a week.  And we feel obligated to equip them the best we can so that they can do the best job they can passing on the faith to our youth.”

After discerning the need for a “sustained effort at forming our catechists,” the parish applied for a grant that would “compensate outside speakers, so that we can have them make presentations on classroom strategies techniques and tactics. We planned them three consecutive Wednesday evening sessions, where the catechists would hear presentations on those topics.”

The grant will pay these outside speakers, and will fund special materials for each cathechist.

“We were happy with the number of grants that were approved for us,” Diepenbrock said. “We submitted six grant requests and they were all approved, and we are very appreciative.”

WORLD YOUTH DAY, SATANTA

St. Alphonsus Parish in Satanta submitted a grant request for help offsetting the cost of sending its youth to World Youth Day in Panama in January 2019.

Request granted.

While the good people of Satanta will still have to raise a great deal of funding, the diocese took a sizable chip out of the sizable chunk of funding required to send their youth to the Central American country in a mere four months. World Youth Day is set to occur Jan. 22-27 in Panama City.

“So far we have 15 youth going to Panama WYD in January 2019,” said Gaby Trejo, a Confirmation teacher at St. Aphonsus Parish.

“Most of the youth going this WYD were just confirmed in April, so I believe its important for our youth to go the year after confirmation to experience their faith and learn more about their faith outside of a classroom or within our community. I think this will help them to confirm and enhance their faith in many different ways.”

The $7,500 grant that the parish received for the trip was a “huge help for the youth and their families. Most of the families can’t afford to pay for the trip.... The funding we received is giving us the chance to make this dream happen.”

Thanks to the motivation of the St. Alphonsus parents and other parishioners, they began holding fundraising activities, “selling enchiladas, tamales, burritos, menudo, an IPAD raffle, and having garage sales. We are blessed with generous people from our parish and the Knights of Columbus with their donations.

“You will not believe how proud I feel of the youth and their families,” Gaby said. “Every activity we have, everyone helps — youth, parents, siblings, grandparents. We are like a little family trying to help each other. We’ve had long nights cooking the day before a food sale. The youth, coming and helping until late at night on weekdays ... were tired, but still worked hard to make this trip possible.

“All I can say is that our community is blessed to have youth like them,” Gaby said. “We will keep working hard fundraising; it will not be easy, but God knows this group deserves going to WYD to experience this unique opportunity.”

 

Stewardship Conference: Lessons for discipleship in troubled times

By STAFF

Southwest Kansas Catholic

Editor’s Note: Rather than condense the Stewardship Conference’s five 20-minute presentations into one- or two-paragraph snippets, the SKC is instead going to present in-depth articles in upcoming issues covering important topics discussed throughout the day-long event. Topics to be covered in upcoming issues: What to do if you are deported; Discipleship when coaching, when working with youth, while parenting; and how to get along with those with whom you disagree.

 

It’s not about the money

Stewardship has long been associated with the offering plate; being stewards of God’s gifts, after all, means sharing with others that with which you’ve been gifted.

Then, how do mass shootings enter into the stewardship picture?

The Stewardship Conference looks far beyond the offering plate, presenting ways for us to be better equipped to serve our Lord and each other.

And therein lies a sad reality. Nowadays, being better equipped to serve others means being prepared for violence.

At the Stewardship Conference Aug. 25, Deputy Steve Billinger of the Barton County Sheriff’s Office, shared a sad reality that hopefully will never hit home for those dozens of people in attendance.

His topic, “What to do if someone shows up with a gun,” was one of several presentations given at this year’s conference at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe. 

The annual conference is organized by Director of Stewardship, Eric Haselhorst. Sessions always manage to reflect the reality of the times, whether it is the tragedy of mass shootings, the how-tos of making social media videos for faith formation, or even how to get along with those you disagree—especially considering the political landscape. 

 

ACTIVE SHOOTER RESPONSE

Tragically, the morning after Deputy Billinger discussed what to do in an “active shooter” situation, 15 people were shot while attending a video game tournament in Jacksonville, Fla. At press time, three people had died, including the assailant.

“This topic is so critical for all of us,” Deputy Billinger said prior to the most recent shooting. “The world has changed. You can even walk into an active shooter environment in a movie theater.

“...On Nov. 5, 2017, Devin Patrick Kelley went into a small Baptist Church [near San Antonio] armed with an assault rifle…. A few minutes later, 28 parishioners had been killed. That tiny church in a town of 400—they never thought this would happen in their community. It always happens somewhere else.”   

Looking around the large cathedral social hall, Deputy Billinger said that if a shooter came into the room, the first impulse would be to seek shelter under your chair. In this case, he said, you would simply be waiting to be executed.

“The key thing to think about is our own mind-set. Our own mind-set is our key to survival.

“...The best option,” he said, pointing to the large glass doors to the outside of the church, “is out those doors, escaping. Next is lockdown. If you are locked in a room with a good door, the shooter will not waste time trying to open the door.”

The next is to hide. Turn off the lights. Make no sound. Another option, he said, is to run, and to run in a zig-zag fashion. It’s very difficult for even seasoned shooters to hit a running target.

The last option is to fight.

“What are you willing to do to survive?” he asked. “If [I were the shooter], you people far outnumber me. Could you not act together?

“Everyone of you are sitting on a weapon that is very effective against my head,” he said, referring to the metal, folding chairs. “If you work together, you can defeat me. Fight aggressively.

“If you don’t become mentally prepared how to react, you won’t react effectively.”

 

EQUIPPING YOUTH TO SERVE YOUTH

Denise Flax, a Ransom High School teacher and religious education instructor  at
St. Aloysius Parish in Ransom, brought two of her students to the gathering, her sons Daren and Jamie, who, with the rest of their PSR class, create social media videos designed to evangelize other young people.

Perfectly fitting the subject of their presentation, the three performed their talk from a prepared script, which was carefully injected with how-tos, valuable advice, and a good dose of humor.

“We must share our faith with kindness, not drill it into them like a jackhammer,” they said, referring to the lessons taught in their videos.

The presentation included a video the class made with a cell-phone camera, “What is Apologetics?”

While they await a grant from the Vibrant Ministries — Uniting Our Church Appeal to help upgrade their video equipment, the cell-phone video shows that even on a shoestring budget, it’s possible to produce a creative, fun, and faith-filled message to the young masses.

 

Being a Disciple as a Parent with Teens

Eric Haselhorst’s presentation was entitled “How to be a Disciple as a Parent with Teens.” He provided examples of how language matters when talking to teenagers.

“Don’t assume negative intent when you ask your kids questions. You can get the same information you need by assuming positive intent.”

Haselhorst spoke about the use of coaching questions when teens face problems.

He concluded with things kids ought to hear from their parents. Among these were: “I’m proud of you,” “I know you can do this,” and “I believe in you.”

 

Complete lists of these communication tools and other hand-outs from Stewardship Day can be found at dcdiocese.org/stewardship/stewardship-day.

Farm, faith and family await one lucky child

By DAVE MYERS

Southwest Kansas Catholic

They are the kind of parents who make you wish you were a kid again.

They are the kind of parents who, when a child one day joins their family through the Catholic Charities of Southwest Kansas Adoption Program, will surround him or her with farm-bred faith and affection and all that goes with it.

 “This summer we rebuilt a go-cart,” Scott Leighton said, referring to their adopted children, Brennan, 12, and Aleaha, 7. “We were able to get the engine running. We do quite a bit of those kinds of things together.”

Brennan “has been super athletic since day one,” said his father, who is an assistant coach when not dealing with the day-to-day routine of raising children. And the children enjoy fishing … and boating … and raising livestock for 4-H.

… And tending to a large garden on the farmland outside of Bentley, northeast of Wichita, where Scott, his wife, Robbie—a physician—and their two children (and assorted animals) reside.

Brennan and Aleaha were adopted by the Leightons through Catholic Charities Dallas, and the couple are currently seeking to adopt their third child through Catholic Charities of Southwest Kansas.            The couple began the adoption process for their third child after having moved back to Kansas from Texas where Robbie was in residency.

They have thus far waited two years since signing on with the southwest Kansas office.

Brennan, much to the shock and surprise of the Leightons, came just days after having turned in their documentation.

“We just barely got the paper work done and was approved,” Scott said with a chuckle. “Two weeks later we found out about Brennan. [The birth-mother] was basically at her due date when we found out about her. It all came super-fast. I think we set a new record at the agency. We didn’t even have any baby things purchased. We called my sister who has a baby and ask what are the things we need now, like a car seat and all that. We had to hurry and get all the purchases.”

“It was a pretty exciting life change,” Robbie added. “Our birth-mom let us be in the room when he was born. It was amazing.”

As other couples have attested, the joy of finding an adoptive child is countered by the sadness in the eyes of the birth-mother when it comes time to say goodbye.

“One of our strongest memories is of our son’s birth-mother’s tears as she decided to leave the hospital,” the couple wrote on their profile, which can be seen at https://spark.adobe.com/page/RCUUWDKkC2w1S/.

“Her tears were our tears. We learned at that moment it is possible for the human heart to break and rejoice at the same time. Our gain was her loss, and we felt it very much.”

There is sadness, yet the burden for the birth-parent(s) is far lighter than in decades past thanks to the open adoption system, which allows birth parents the choice of remaining a part of the adopted child’s life. Like many parents, the Leightons were concerned at first about the system, but now wouldn’t have it any other way.

“Brennan’s birth-mom called us every day for two weeks after the adoption,” Robbie said.  “She visited the house and saw his room. When she got her GED that December, we went to her graduation.”

Their daughter Aleaha, now seven, entered the couple’s lives a few years after Brennan, a little more than six months after they submitted their paper-work.

“Her birth-mother was very, very young,” Robbie explained.

Unless you’ve lived it, it’s impossible to imagine the heart of a woman, especially a young girl, in such a situation. And for this young girl, meeting the Kansas couple proved to be too much for her.

“We didn’t get to see her,” Robbie said, sadly. But 14 months after Aleaha was born, her father and his parents contacted them. The young father wanted to meet his little birth-daughter.

“So, she knows her birth-father’s family,” Robbie said, joyfully. “They’ve seen Aleaha a number of times in the last few years.”

The children attend Catholic school in Ost, Kansas and enjoy a farm-life the couple were born into that never left them even when they moved deep into the heart of Texas. Their faith has held firm all these years, even through the roughest rough-patch of all, when Scott was partially paralyzed in a car accident, leaving him a reluctant hero to all those who mistakenly consider him disabled, and certainly to his children.

Robbie, who is a native of St. Francis and has family in Scott City, and Scott, originally from Quinter, concluded their profile on the Catholic Charities website with this final note to any soon-to-be parent seeking a family for her child:

“We look forward to a new addition to our family. Our children can’t wait to meet their new baby brother or sister and share in the adoption experience. We hope you will get to know us better.

“May God bless you and hold you in his arms as you determine what is best for you and your baby.”

 

For more information, go to https://catholiccharitiesswks.org/, or contact Catholic Charities Adoption Social Worker Lori Titsworth,  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., (620) 792-1393.

 

The seeds of suicide

By DAVE MYERS

Southwest Kansas Catholic

St. Veronica wiped the face of Jesus, bloodied by the Romans.

Larry Black of Salina as a boy wiped the face of his mother, bloodied by his father’s fists.

It was one incident of many in a troubled childhood that would ultimately lead to thoughts of suicide.

Black, a substance abuse counselor, was one of two speakers at the annual Teachers Conference Aug. 16 at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe.

The annual gathering offers a time for teachers and principals from Catholic schools across the diocese to get together to discuss important issues just prior to the start of the school year.

“The seeds of whether or not you’re a bad person … are planted early in life,” Black told those gathered. “I grew up in an alcoholic home. Imagine being seven, bringing home your report card that you are really proud of, showing it to you father and having him smack you because you didn’t mow the lawn? Or having him wake you at 3 a.m., bring you to Mom and saying, ‘This is what a c___ looks like’?”

And then there were those nights when he had to wipe the blood from his mother’s face brought by his father’s fists.

They are challenges mostly invisible to those on the outside, but yet they infect the heart of the young like a virus. It’s a virus that keeps children from having friends—they certainly can’t bring friends in the house, after all. There’s no consistency, Black said; there’s no structure. There’s no safe place—all so needed by children.

“One thing that would have been so great is to have a teacher who would have just listened to me,” Black said. “It is most important to learn what kids are encountering in their lives.”

Superintendent of Catholic Schools, Trina Delgado echoed these statements:

“We’re told that children are an open book, that we are there to fill in the pages. Yet, emotionally, that book may already be written. What we can do is to help them write the next chapter.”

But to be sure, a bad childhood isn’t the only recipe for thoughts of suicide.

“We teach them the three Rs, but we don’t teach them how to live, how to deal with shame …,” Black said.

The proclivity of social media has created a 24/7 boarding house for anonymous insults, inappropriate photo sharing, and a host of anonymous venom.

We have to start with the people who are “face-to-face with the students,” Black said, referring to teachers. “We must get into the face of the child and listen to them. If we don’t have a relationship, they won’t tell us the hard stuff. Healing starts with one human being making time for another human being.”

When Black was growing up, he battled his own thoughts of suicide. Then, one day when he was working at a fast-food restaurant drive-through window, an in-law who worked at a treatment facility came driving through and asked him to apply for a job as a counselor. The drive-through window closed, and a door opened.

With no experience, he applied. He was trained and suddenly found himself counseling those who were going through similar things to what he had experienced.

“My greatest strength is my pain,” he said. “Through my pain, I can help someone with their pain.”

50,000 die from opioids in one year

By DAVE MYERS

Southwest Kansas Catholic

If you think the opioid epidemic is bad now, it’s nothing compared to what is lurking around the corner.

“We have a flood coming our way,” substance abuse counselor Larry Black told teachers and principals gathered for the annual Diocesan Teachers Conference Aug. 16. “It’s not quite here yet, but it’s coming.”

Today, an estimated two million Americans are addicted to opioid painkillers, with an estimated 50,000 dying from opioids in one year alone.

“We see people on 60 to 80 pills a day,” Black said. “They build up a tolerance. Most start very innocently—normal people who maybe had a knee replacement. Most doctors really have the best interest of their patient at heart, but they’re busy. This doctor doesn’t want the patient to have to drive 60 or 70 miles to get their prescription filled, so they give them a month’s worth of pills.”

The problem is, the pills don’t only give relief to pain, but also to stress—stress from the workplace, the government, the typical anxieties of life. And when that month of pills is gone in a week, that’s when you see problems begin to arise. You see people turning to the black market. You see the criminal element giving supply to the demand.

“My son was the most grateful kid,” Black said. “There was a joy about him.”

Then, at 15, his behavior and attitude underwent a marked change.

“His grades went down. We would stay up with him to do his homework, but he wouldn’t turn it in. We took him to school to make sure he went in, and he’d go right out the back door.

“I think we were good parents,” Black explained. “We didn’t drink or smoke. We went to church.”

The teenager who had been so joyful brought people over “who were just plain mean. One boy later killed his father.”

Amid the trauma of everyday life, miracles do abound. Their son agreed to enter a treatment facility.

“The hardest thing to do is to get help,” Black said. “We were almost out of hope. Not only did our son learn how to live life without drugs, I learned to be a better dad. A counselor told us that you can’t focus your life on being right. I had to give up being right and focus on my relationship with my son.”

In other words, when his son got kicked out of his first facility for having been caught with a girl in his room, Black didn’t get angry. Empowered by his newfound advice, he instead joked with his son as they drove home at 3 a.m.: “She was good looking! I would have gotten kicked out for her, too!”

The most important result? “He smiled,” Black said of his troubled son.

It didn’t happen overnight. In fact, it took two stints in the treatment center before Black’s son came to terms with his drug use.

“A lot of what happens in recovery is that people feel like they deserve to be punished more for what they’ve done. I ask them, ‘The person who loves you most, how much longer do they need you to suffer?’ I didn’t want my son to suffer one more day.

“Today, my son and I text each other every day to say I love you.”

So, who is the bad guy in all this?

“The biggest bad guys? The pharmaceutical industries,” Black explained. According to addictions.com, “An estimated 254 million opioid prescriptions were filled in 2010 alone, enough to medicate every adult in the U.S. for a month on a round-the-clock basis. In that same year, pharmaceutical companies generated revenues of $11 billion from opioid sales alone.”

The result has been that opioid addiction rates have skyrocketed.

As long as there is demand, there will be supply. The best thing we can do is to communicate loudly and with resolve the dangers of opioids, to call pharmaceutical companies on the carpet. Also, he urged the medical industry to train more physicians to prescribe opioid withdrawal programs, and to increase the availability of the narcotic blocker, Naxalone, for withdrawal.

“In-patient treatment is only the beginning,” Black said. “Each person should be given a recovery coach.

“No one seeks help until the consequence of using outweigh the benefits of not using. We need to endeavor to increase the beneffits of not using.”

For more information or to seek help, visit https://ckfaddictiontreatment.org/, or call (785) 825-6224.

 

Past Issues

May 5, 2019

April 21, 2019

Easter Sunday

April 7, 2019

March 24, 2019

March 10, 2019

Feb. 24, 2019

Feb. 10, 2019

Jan. 27, 2019

Jan. 13, 2019

Dec. 23, 2018

Dec. 9, 2018

Nov. 25, 2018

Nov. 11, 2018

Oct. 28, 2018

Oct. 14, 2018

Sept. 16, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: 2018 Golf Classic; student athletes; physically challenged; Leonard Stegman; Lesson in forgiveness; Sending us on a mission

Sept. 2, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Priest crisis; Scandal; Opioid addictions; Seeds of Suicide; Leightons; St. Anne; Vincke; seminarians; Dominican Sisters; Stewardship Conference; Dead Sea Scrolls; PSR programs; Roe V. Wade

 

August 12, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Prayer and Action; Totus Tuus; Janee Bernal; Diana Ramirez; Heidy Ramirez; Bishop Gilmore honored for 20 years ministry; suicide; contraception and abortion; Dead Sea Scrolls; Humanae Vitae; certification in youth ministry; Chuck Weber; Cathedral rectory chapel; Sister Viola Heichelbech; Adam Urban

July 15, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Immigration Protest/Rally; Faith and Light Fiesta; Seeing the Dead Sea Scrolls; Corpus Christi procession; Prayers for priests; Sisters turn 100; Michael Brungardt; Gerald Vincke; Massacre in San Salvador; Action for Alex 

 

June 3, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Parish Pray for Priestly Vocations; Appeal reaches $10 million; Gangs; Seminarians; Pam Willis; Why I like being a priest; Happy Father's Day; Patricia Lujan; Tyler and Rachel Bennett; Adoption Protection Act.

May 20, 2018
KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Track meet; Beloved Sinners; Benjamin Martin retires; Smiles; Future of Fortune Telling; Hoisington mission; DofI; Getting Equipped; Spring Social; First Communion; Confirmation
KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Track meet; Beloved Sinners; Benjamin Martin retires; Smiles; Future of Fortune Telling; Hoisington mission; DofI; Getting Equipped; Spring Social; First Communion; Confirmation

May 6, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Archbishop Romero; Seeing, Touching, Tasting; Exhortation; Father Patrick Conroy; Happy Mother's Day; A child on your doorstep; Vibrant Ministries Grant; From the heart of a young father; Love Gives Life; Roman Holiday; Smartphone; retirement
Fossil Hunting

 

April 15, 2018

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Easter Vigil; Angelica Village; Colorado woman; The art of anger; Cimarron Couple; Staats; Adoption; 

Father Ultan Murphy anniversary; Coughlan; Spiritual Advisor to Hoodlums; Woman of Courage; Oration contest; Darcy Feist  

 

April 1, 2018

 

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Defending Adoption; Led by the Spirit; Knights; ABC Pregnancy Center;
Memorial of Mary; Homeless; Relics; Down syndrome abortion; Chrism Mass

 

March 18, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: SKYAC; Aleksandr Men; Fasting for Priestly Vocations; Uganda; School for deaf; Rannah Evetts; Oberle; Rachel and Doug Trombley; Oscar Romero; Paul VI; DACA

 

 

March 4, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Fasting for priestly vocations; Father Juan; Fasting and prayer;
Quest Weekend 2018; DACA; With God, anything is possible; Homelessness in our communities; Rhubarb, Kansas;
What's the point of fasting; Rite of Election; same-sex couples

 

Feb. 18, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Catholic Schools Week; Rachel Doll; Ellinwood; Great Bend; Garden City; Ness City; Dodge City; Sister Rita Schwarzenberger; Nigeria; Bishop Hermes; Fasting for Priestly Vocations; World Day for Consecrated Life; 50th Anniversary St. Dominic School; What will life be like in 50 years?

 

 

Feb. 4, 2018

 

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: March for Life; Tracy and Ross Smith; Adoption; Vibrant Ministries; Faith and Light;
Pro-Life; Mortal sin to discard elderly; DACA; Abortion; Dreamers; Human Trafficking

 

Jan. 21, 2018

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Louise Korbe; Anne Frank; Miep Gies; Home Heat; Father Solanus

 

Jan. 7, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Good news and kingdom living; dreamers; Sister Teresa Orozco; Infant Adoption; Elderly; a moral conundrum; seminarian; feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe

 

 

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