CATHOLIC NEWS AGENCY Daily Feed

USAVaticanAmericasEuropeAsia PacificMiddle East Africa

Saint of the DayBook ReviewsGuest Columnist

 

 

August 4, 2019

IN THIS ISSUE: Prayer and Action; Action for Alex; Totus Tuus; Camp Cristo Rey; Father Schawe in GuatemalaSt. Francis Cabrini Fraternity; EmPowering those facing challenges; Pro-Life group brings help, hope to border; Seminarians' Summer Ministries; How Catholics Pray

July 7, 2019

    The Dead Sea Scrolls series

 

   St. Nicholas School, Kinsley, Advent Cantata, Dec. 7, 2008

 

   

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

 

Scroll to bottom to navigate to different departments

The brain’s love affair with drugs

By Charlene Scott Myers

Special to the Catholic

A man who lived for years with low self esteem — and suffered because of it — urged teachers of Catholic schools to “learn what kids are encountering in their lives.”

 The teachers from Catholic schools throughout the Diocese of Dodge City gathered at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe Aug. 16 to discuss “the opioid crisis in Kansas” and to try to figure out why students take drugs that sometimes lead them to suicide.

Three youths of varying ages have committed suicide in recent months in the Dodge City area.

 Raymond Colligan was one of the two speakers at the cathedral gathering.

“When I was a freshman at a Catholic high school, my mother learned to dislike one of my teachers because of what he taught,” Colligan recalled.

“It wasn’t such a thing as a bad word, just words used badly,” he explained.

  “We students were not allowed to use the ‘N’ word or ‘bullocks,’ (a derogatory and vulgar British slang word that means spineless and lacking in courage.)”

But apparently, his teacher used the words, and some of his classmates taunted him by yelling that Colligan’s name was “bullocks.”

So following his graduation, he set out to prove his rude classmates were wrong.      

He devoted himself to Native Americans, and worked for the Jesuits on the Rosebud Indian Reservation in South Dakota for 18 years.

“And without my consent, I was formed to do the work I do now,” he said. 

Colligan received a Masters Degree in Counseling Studies and is a Licensed Clinical Addictions Counselor.  He was employed by Valley Hope, an alcohol and drug addiction treatment center, where he worked for 18 years.

He currently is in his fourth year of private practice, in addition to counseling on an outpatient basis.

“My job is to help people seek wisdom,” he told the teachers. 

“When a student is ready, God will send the teacher,” added the speaker who said he was “raised by Dominican Sisters.”

“The desire of my heart today is to inspire,” he told his audience of teachers.  “The word ‘insparata’ means ‘divinely touched.’”

Colligan noted that drug addiction “now is described as a brain disease,” and explained why drug addicts are “captured” by drug dependency.

“The brain changes,” he explained.  “It is profound.  You have a love affair with the drugs. The brain has us seeking pleasurable behavior, and the seeking continues despite the consequences.

“There is not a person in this room who has not experienced behavior repeating itself over and over.  We are seekers of pleasure, and despite the consequences, we keep at the behavior.  We seek relief from stress and wish to feel better and improve our performance.”

Human beings also like fun, and experience cultural pressure to experiment “with this or that,” he added.  “The human brain loves what it loves.  It took a long time in the midst of my growing up to learn that I lived in a culture that addicts us.

“My father was an Irishman, and I developed my self esteem based on my performance and work.  My first job was when I was a junior in high school.  I was driven, compulsive, and later learned I was addicted to work.

“Along with that job came cigarettes.  I was a junior and 18, and I carried a pack of cigarettes, and they couldn’t do anything about it!

 “I learned that white people and white cultures have an addiction to superiority.  For the 18 years I lived with Native Americans, I learned that some cultures have awful, awful problems, and that rich people can be dangerous with their huge sense of entitlement.”

Jesus said that it was as difficult for a rich man to enter heaven as for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle, Colligan noted. 

“Poor people can get addicted to powerlessness and being victimized,” he said. “I have witnessed that.”

To break a self image and change your story takes a tremendous amount of hard work, he acknowledged.

“As a little boy, because of my father’s neglect, I believed I was unlovable, and I was not sure I would ever amount to anything.  I had to learn how to free my mind.  

“We need to look at the way we think,” he said.  “AA (Alcoholics Anonymous) has an expression ‘stinkin thinkin.’  We have to take on our attitude and way of behaving.  That’s what AA calls recovery, and that’s what I call salvation!”           

 

Please Forgive

By the MOST REV. JOHN B. BRUNGARDT

Bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Dodge City

Yes, troubling news regarding the abuse scandal in the Church.  We discussed it at length at our diocesan directors’ meeting and our presbyteral council meeting.  Some of the words expressed: betrayal, sadness, “punched in the gut,” shame, anger, horror, pain, ...

 I reflect in my mind and heart and spirit:

  • We all seek Jesus Christ, our Lord and Savior, the Wounded One. Jesus Forsaken on the cross. We ask for healing for the victims and their families.  Christ is the Divine Physician of our body and soul.  He will heal all.  “And one of them, realizing he had been healed, returned, glorifying God” (Luke 17:15).
  • We are sinners. We bishops are sinners. We priests are sinners.  All are sinners.  The Gospel from a recent Holy Mass was the question to Jesus: “how often must I forgive … ?”  Jesus responds: “seventy-seven times,” meaning we are called to keep forgiving our brothers and sisters, over and over (Matthew 18:21-22).  I am sorry.  Please forgive us bishops and priests.
  • We seek justice. Justice for the perpetrators and enablers. We ask for deeper involvement by civil authorities and the laity, in order to seek justice.  “It is [the Lord] who judges the world with justice” (Psalm 9:9).

Bring all to prayer – our Loving Lord is with you; He loves you so much.       

Stewardship Conference, Aug. 25, Dodge City

‘You must be crazy!’

or ‘How to have a conversation with those you disagree’

WHAT? Stewardship Conference

WHEN? 9:30 a.m. - 3:50 p.m., Saturday, August 25

WHERE? Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe,  3231 N. 14th St., Dodge City

WHY? The day will be filled with discussions of topics relevant to the present time. The ministry showcase in the gathering area will highlight dozens of ways you can become involved. The day concludes with the celebration of Mass

COST? There is no cost to attend.

FOOD? A lunch is provided free of charge.

FREEBIES? The ministry showcase typically offers dozens of free items to take home.

WHAT ABOUT DAYCARE? Bring the kids! Daycare will be provided.

DO I HAVE TO REGISTER? Yes, primarily for a lunch count. Go to www.dcdiocese.org/stewardship, or, you can call Eric at (620) 227-1537.

 

By Dave Myers

  Shelley Hansel could hardly have come up with a more appropriate topic for her keynote presentation at the Aug. 25, 2018 Stewardship Conference at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe in Dodge City: “How to have a conversation with those you disagree.”

Holiday dinners and discussions around the water cooler can be exercises in frustration and oftentimes anger if the individuals doing the conversing have strong differences of opinion. And in these days of intense political polarization, vehement differences of opinion are more common than not.

How many friends and family have you unfriended on Facebook due to their political views?

“We can learn how to love our family and friends while disagreeing,” Hansel says.

Most of the topics being addressed at this year’s Stewardship Conference will be just as timely.

Steve Bellinger, for example, will discuss “What if someone comes to church with a gun?” (This topic may affect your thoughts on the first address!) Yesteryear, the answer would have been an immediate, “Call the police!” But in the days when guns are more common than they were in old Spaghetti Westerns, the question isn’t as easy to answer.

I wonder just how many people around me are carrying guns?

Jessica Soto-Botello of Catholic Charities will discuss a topic much more weighty for a large minority of southwest Kansans, but important as well to friends, family and employers. Her topic? “What to do if I’m deported.”

It’s not out of the question for a person who doesn’t speak Spanish to be deported to a Spanish-speaking country. Or for a mother to be deported without being able to notify her children who await her arrival at home in a southwest Kansas town.

It’s a notion that most of us are blessed not to have to worry about, but there’s a good chance we know someone who does.

Another topic to be discussed is, “How to Fire a Volunteer.” It might be considered an odd choice for a Stewardship Conference, except when considering that this is something with which parishes often have to contend.

Conference organizer Eric Haselhorst noted that the workshop is just as much about helping volunteers to focus their talents where they’re needed most.

This year’s conference will be a little different than in years past. Instead of 50-minute breakout sessions, they will be only 20 minutes long, allowing people to attend more of the talks.

Several concurrent talks will discuss the idea of mission when it comes to coaching, conversation, and being a parent of high school age kids. Gentry Heimerman, diocesan Director of Young Adult Ministry, will discuss “Being a Missionary in Youth Ministry.” And Denise Flax will present information on making dDo-it-yourself evangelization videos.

The day includes a free lunch, a large ministry showcase highlighting area ministries (and how you can get involved), and lots of freebies. The day will conclude with the celebration of Mass.

 

For more information, or to register online, go to www.dcdiocese.org/stewardship, or call (620) 227-1537.

Diocese offers certification in youth ministry

 The Catholic dioceses of Dodge City and Salina, in partnership with Newman University, will begin offering classes in youth ministry through the ITV (Interactive Television) system in September.

Two three-credit-hour courses, and three one-credit-hour courses – as well as a project decided upon by the student and the coordinating instructor -- are required to earn certification in youth ministry.

If one class is taken each semester beginning in September, 2018, a student could obtain certification by the Spring of 2020. Since the classes are a special focus of the Pastoral Ministry Formation Program, students may choose to continue classes until they earn a degree or diploma in Pastoral Ministry Formation.

Dodge City Bishop John B. Brungardt and Salina Bishop Gerald Vincke encourage every parish to have one or more parishioners prepared with a Youth Ministry Certificate so that they may support and encourage our youth in their unfolding discipleship.

The classes will:

• Seek to help those who minister to youth specifically and those who minister indirectly understand the components necessary to develop a comprehensive ministry to meet the spiritual, catechetical and social needs of our youth.

• Form adults in missionary discipleship to engage the gift of our teenagers in our Church.

• Unpack the U.S. Bishop’s document, “Renewing the Vision: A Framework for Catholic Youth Ministry”, and, “Pastoral Juvenil Hispana”.

The first course, “Theology and Methods of Ministry,” presented by Father Robert Schremmer, Vicar General, will be offered from 8:30 a.m.-Noon, Saturdays from Sept. 8-Nov. 3, 2018. This is a three-credit-hour course and is required for certification.

Core three-credit-hour courses include: Introduction to New Testament; Christian Morality and Social Issues; Christology; Sacramental Theology; Theology of the Church; The Creeds and Faith; and Introduction to Old Testament.

“The Why of Ministry,” a one-credit-hour course, will be presented by Gentry Heimerman in the Spring of 2019, and is also a required course. Heimerman, Director of Young Adult Ministry for the Diocese of Dodge City, is one of the coordinators of the new youth ministry certification program.

One-credit-hour courses include: RCIA Kansas; Celebrating Crossing Cultural Boundaries; Get Equipped; and Accompanying Youth and Young Adults on Their Journey.

Cost is $50 per credit-hour. Through “Church in Partnership”, a program of the Diocese of Dodge City and Newman University, these costs are discounted from regular prices charged by Newman University per credit hour.

For more information, visit www.dcdiocese.org, or contact Coleen Stein, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., (620) 227-1538.

 

Passion for the Mission

By CHUCK WEBER
Executive Director, Kansas Catholic Conference

The smile of a newly ordained priest is unforgettable.  His eagerness to face worldly and spiritual challenges is unmistakable.  Saving souls for Christ is now his sacred mission of service.  A steadfast reliance on the Catholic Faith, the Sacraments and the time-tested wisdom of Mother Church will see him through.

Newly ordained priests (in fact, all priests, Consecrated Religious and lay servants of the Catholic Church) inspire and energize me as I embark on my own mission—serving as Executive Director of the Kansas Catholic Conference (KCC).

The KCC is the “public policy voice” of the Catholic Bishops of Kansas, including a man I have long known and admired, Bishop John Brungardt of the Dodge City Diocese. 

Understandably, few Catholics in the pew are aware of the KCC mission. Much of our work takes place at the Statehouse in Topeka. The KCC supports and promotes legislation that respects the dignity of the human person and serves the common good.  It happens in the spirit of the Beatitudes and in accord with the teachings of the Catholic Church. Bills signed into law—or defeated—impact our daily lives. 

Protecting human life, defending religious liberty and preserving traditional marriage and the family, are foundational Catholic principles.  The Catholic Church in Kansas has been and will continue to be at the forefront of these “hot button” issues.  Other concerns, including school choice, healthcare, immigration, and the welfare of the poor, elderly and disabled are always under our watchful eye.

As a husband and father of five children—including a son with Down syndrome and my elderly mother under our care—I hope to bring my own life experiences to bear in working with elected officials.  My experience as a former state legislator will also be helpful.

In the weeks and months ahead please look to the Southwest Kansas Catholic and the Kansas Catholic Conference website and Facebook page for updates and analysis on the issues facing Kansas Catholics.  I promise to communicate with you about what’s happening, including an initiative to make prayer a central theme in all that we do.   Please let me know what is on your mind.

Like a newly ordained priest setting off on a new, exciting journey, your support and prayers will be crucial to the success of our common mission.   It is one thing to win a cultural debate—or even a vote. It is quite another to seek a servant’s temperament, win over a heart and bring someone closer to Our Redeemer. 

Thank you for the privilege of serving you in this way.

 

Chuck Weber resides in Wichita with his family and is a longtime parishioner of the Church of the Resurrection.  He can be contacted by email at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

Cathedral rectory chapel dedicated to Saints Peter and Paul

By TIM WENZL
Southwest Kansas Catholic

The 477th anniversary of Father Juan De Padilla’s “first Mass in Kansas” on June 29, 1541, was celebrated fittingly enough with an outdoor Mass at the parish rectory in Dodge City. Father Wesley Schave, pastor of the Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe, and Father Aneesh Parappanattud, MSFS, parochial vicar, concelebrated. The rectory chapel, here before without a patron, was dedicated to Saints Peter and Paul.

Following the Mass, the congregation was invited into the rectory to view the chapel and tour the priests’ residence. A storyboard inside the residence provided a brief history of the rectory entitled “This Old Catholic House.”

The residence, constructed in 1890, was the home of James M. and Maude Kirkpatrick. The Kirkpatricks belonged to the First Methodist Church. They had six children: two sons and four daughters. Kirkpatrick was an attorney. He served two terms as Ford County Attorney. Toward the end of his career, he limited his practice to abstract and title law.

The house remained in the hands of the Kirkpatrick family until one of the daughters sold the residence to Charles L. Clinton in 1943. Clinton owned the Wholesale Brokerage Company and was a member of the National Candy Wholesale Association. He also served as Mayor of Dodge City from 1951 to 1954.

In 1953, during the pastorate of Msgr. Joseph Grellner, plans were underway to expand Sacred Heart School with additional classrooms, offices, a kitchen and a gymnasium-auditorium.

The nine Sisters of St. Joseph who taught in the school were living in a convent at 907 Central Avenue. This residence needed to be removed to allow room for construction to proceed.

The Clinton home, located just north of the school on Elm Street, was purchased as the new convent for the Sisters on December 31, 1953, for $25,000

The two-story stucco home served the Sisters of St. Joseph as a convent for the next 32 years.

Father Joseph Bahr, pastor from 1984-1988, was looking to purchase a residence near the parish plant and make the rectory space between the church and school available for offices and classrooms.

The two Sisters of St. Joseph in ministry at the school during this time offered the convent to the pastor and his assistant as a rectory.

The Sisters moved to Saint Mary of the Plains College to live in community with the Sisters in ministry on the campus.

This house has served as the rectory for the priests at Sacred Heart Cathedral and now the Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe since 1985.

 

 

 

Past Issues

June 9, 2019

May 19, 2019

May 5, 2019

April 21, 2019

Easter Sunday

April 7, 2019

March 24, 2019

March 10, 2019

Feb. 24, 2019

Feb. 10, 2019

Jan. 27, 2019

Jan. 13, 2019

Dec. 23, 2018

Dec. 9, 2018

Nov. 25, 2018

Nov. 11, 2018

Oct. 28, 2018

Oct. 14, 2018

Sept. 16, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: 2018 Golf Classic; student athletes; physically challenged; Leonard Stegman; Lesson in forgiveness; Sending us on a mission

Sept. 2, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Priest crisis; Scandal; Opioid addictions; Seeds of Suicide; Leightons; St. Anne; Vincke; seminarians; Dominican Sisters; Stewardship Conference; Dead Sea Scrolls; PSR programs; Roe V. Wade

 

August 12, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Prayer and Action; Totus Tuus; Janee Bernal; Diana Ramirez; Heidy Ramirez; Bishop Gilmore honored for 20 years ministry; suicide; contraception and abortion; Dead Sea Scrolls; Humanae Vitae; certification in youth ministry; Chuck Weber; Cathedral rectory chapel; Sister Viola Heichelbech; Adam Urban

July 15, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Immigration Protest/Rally; Faith and Light Fiesta; Seeing the Dead Sea Scrolls; Corpus Christi procession; Prayers for priests; Sisters turn 100; Michael Brungardt; Gerald Vincke; Massacre in San Salvador; Action for Alex 

 

June 3, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Parish Pray for Priestly Vocations; Appeal reaches $10 million; Gangs; Seminarians; Pam Willis; Why I like being a priest; Happy Father's Day; Patricia Lujan; Tyler and Rachel Bennett; Adoption Protection Act.

May 20, 2018
KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Track meet; Beloved Sinners; Benjamin Martin retires; Smiles; Future of Fortune Telling; Hoisington mission; DofI; Getting Equipped; Spring Social; First Communion; Confirmation
KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Track meet; Beloved Sinners; Benjamin Martin retires; Smiles; Future of Fortune Telling; Hoisington mission; DofI; Getting Equipped; Spring Social; First Communion; Confirmation

May 6, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Archbishop Romero; Seeing, Touching, Tasting; Exhortation; Father Patrick Conroy; Happy Mother's Day; A child on your doorstep; Vibrant Ministries Grant; From the heart of a young father; Love Gives Life; Roman Holiday; Smartphone; retirement
Fossil Hunting

 

April 15, 2018

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Easter Vigil; Angelica Village; Colorado woman; The art of anger; Cimarron Couple; Staats; Adoption; 

Father Ultan Murphy anniversary; Coughlan; Spiritual Advisor to Hoodlums; Woman of Courage; Oration contest; Darcy Feist  

 

April 1, 2018

 

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Defending Adoption; Led by the Spirit; Knights; ABC Pregnancy Center;
Memorial of Mary; Homeless; Relics; Down syndrome abortion; Chrism Mass

 

March 18, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: SKYAC; Aleksandr Men; Fasting for Priestly Vocations; Uganda; School for deaf; Rannah Evetts; Oberle; Rachel and Doug Trombley; Oscar Romero; Paul VI; DACA

 

 

March 4, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Fasting for priestly vocations; Father Juan; Fasting and prayer;
Quest Weekend 2018; DACA; With God, anything is possible; Homelessness in our communities; Rhubarb, Kansas;
What's the point of fasting; Rite of Election; same-sex couples

 

Feb. 18, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Catholic Schools Week; Rachel Doll; Ellinwood; Great Bend; Garden City; Ness City; Dodge City; Sister Rita Schwarzenberger; Nigeria; Bishop Hermes; Fasting for Priestly Vocations; World Day for Consecrated Life; 50th Anniversary St. Dominic School; What will life be like in 50 years?

 

 

Feb. 4, 2018

 

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: March for Life; Tracy and Ross Smith; Adoption; Vibrant Ministries; Faith and Light;
Pro-Life; Mortal sin to discard elderly; DACA; Abortion; Dreamers; Human Trafficking

 

Jan. 21, 2018

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Louise Korbe; Anne Frank; Miep Gies; Home Heat; Father Solanus

 

Jan. 7, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Good news and kingdom living; dreamers; Sister Teresa Orozco; Infant Adoption; Elderly; a moral conundrum; seminarian; feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe

 

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

 

Site by Solutio