CATHOLIC NEWS AGENCY Daily Feed

USAVaticanAmericasEuropeAsia PacificMiddle East Africa

Saint of the DayBook ReviewsGuest Columnist

 

 

June 9, 2019

 

May 19, 2019

 

 

 

 

    The Dead Sea Scrolls series

 

   St. Nicholas School, Kinsley, Advent Cantata, Dec. 7, 2008

 

   

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

 

Scroll to bottom to navigate to different departments

Dead Sea Scrolls foretold the coming of the Son of God

 Editor’s note: This is the second of a series of articles on the Dead Sea Scrolls.

By Charlene Scott-Myers
Southwest Kansas Catholic

One text of the Dead Sea Scrolls, which are 1,000 years older than any other extant manuscripts, specifically is a prophecy of the days to come of Jesus and His teachings.

   Text number 4Q246 reads: 

“He shall be called the Son of the Great [God], and by his name shall he be hailed as the Son of God, and they shall call him Son of the Most High.  (See BAR Magazine, March/April 1990, page 24). 

According to John J. Davis, author of “The Dead Sea Scrolls,” this is the first time that the expression “Son of God” has been found in a Palestinian text outside of the Bible.

A Catholic Dominican priest, Father Roland de Vaux, joined G.L. Harding in excavating Khribet Qumran between 1951 and 1956.

“Evidence from this small village indicates the Dead Sea Scrolls were copied there,” Davis wrote.  “The inhabitants – most likely the Jewish sect known as the Essenes – hid the scrolls in nearby caves when they learned of the approach of the Roman army.”

The hated Romans had ravaged Jerusalem and the many smaller villages in the nearby mountainous areas, but had left the rougher country near the Dead Sea and the high mountain fortress of Masada that was King Herod’s refuge as the last to be attacked and conquered.

(The oldest Hebrew text prior to the 1947 Dead Sea Scroll discoveries was the Ben Asher Text located in Jerusalem and Bethlehem.) 

When they learned of the great monetary value of the Dead Sea Scrolls, Bedouins, archaeologists, scholars, and just plain thieves began to ravage the caves along the northwest shores of the Dead Sea, surely dunking themselves into the murky and sticky sea in the horrible heat, and later selling the scraps (which most of them could neither read nor decipher).

Davis reported that “Expeditions were launched into various valleys or ‘wadis,’ dry creeks or river beds with hills on either side, along the west shore of the Dead Sea,” (where their footprints and mine from visiting there many years later were washed away with the tide.)

A total of 230 caves were explored by archaeologists after the original finds. About 40 of these caves contained pottery and other objects, while 25 caves held pottery of the same type as that found in the original cave.  A dozen or more caves contained manuscript fragments.

My husband Dave and I saw several ancient pots and clay dishes from Israel at the recent scrolls exhibit in Denver.  (The pots and dishes looked almost identical to  Frankoma ware that is created  and sold in Oklahoma!)

One of the larger wadis in Israel is found at Wadi Qumran, which we visited. It is situated next to a site that formerly contained many ruins.  Once thought to be the remains of a Roman fort, this site now is known as Khirbet Qumran or “ruins of Qumran.” 

We walked around and among those ancient stones, whose rooms had been occupied as long ago as the end of the second century B.C. to A.D. 68.  Large stone remains of a long, narrow room were thought to be the dining and prayer room of the monks who had occupied the site and worshipped there, having fled from the Romans when they attacked Jerusalem. 

“A religious community lived at the site from the end of the second century B.C. to A.D. 68,” Davis wrote.  “The Romans had a garrison there between A.D. 68 and 86, and the final occupation at the site was by Jewish insurgents in the second war against Rome (A.D. 132-135).” 

Those last insurgents killed themselves and their families rather than surrender to the Romans and become their slaves for life.

One-fourth of all the scrolls and fragments found in the caves were copies of different books of the Hebrew Old Testament, and every book in the Hebrew canon is represented among the scrolls, except for the book of Esther.

Parts of books such as Deuteronomy, Isaiah, the Minor Prophets or the Psalms were found in more than ten copies.  The Book of Job was written in the normal square Hebrew characters called paleo-Hebrew script, and in Aramaic translation. 

Among the Jews at Qumran, the most popular scripture was the Book of Daniel.

Davis reported that “No fewer than eight manuscripts of the book were found in three different caves.”

“The most spectacular discovery among the Dead Sea caves was a complete scroll of the book of Isaiah in Hebrew that measured 24 feet long,” he added.  “The text of this Old Testament book (about 100 B.C.) was very much like the Ben Asher Text of A.D. 926.

“This fact gave scholars confidence that the translation of the book of Isaiah, which appears in our modern English translations and is based on the Ben Asher text, is a reliable one.”

Surprisingly, Davis revealed something that I never have read previously in my studies of the Dead Sea Scrolls.

“As noteworthy as the Dead Sea finds were in 1947 and following, there is historical evidence that similar scrolls and manuscripts had been discovered in the region much earlier,” Davis wrote.

Bishop Epiphanius of Salamis, fourth century A.D. refers to Old Testament manuscripts in Hebrew and Greek found concealed in clay jars near Jericho in A.D. 217.

Eusebius lived from the third to the fourth century A.D. and referred to the discovery of the manuscripts found in the large jars.

Then in the eighth century A.D., Timothy I, who was the patriarch of the Nestorian Church, recorded the fact that “more than 200 psalms of David” were found near Jericho. 

Here are some more facts that you can file away for future use: three-fourths of the Dead Sea manuscripts include the Apocrypha (14 books in the Greek Septuagint, but not in the Hebrew Canon), the Pseudepiographa (books that were falsely ascribed to Old Testament writers), and commentaries on books of the Old Testament such as Habakkuk, which dates to 25 B.C. – and sadly for readers has had the bottoms of many of its columns eaten away!

The Dead Sea Scroll monks also wrote a rather severe piece of literature called the “Manual of Discipline,” dating back to 100 B.C.  They didn’t seem to care much for women.

The historian Josephus, whom I have quoted many times in other articles, did write about the Essenes, whom he hardly could ignore since at one time there were 4,000 of them living along the northwest shore of the Dead Sea, where I went for a float among the chunks of salt.

Recently it came to light that the head of a Jewish sect had written a letter to a king or priest in 160 B.C. The letter cited 22 matters on which the sect disagreed with mainstream Judaic thought.

So, some scholars now believe the people at Qumran may have been Sadducees rather than Essenes.

 

 

 

 

 

New faces at the Catholic Chancery

Appeal leads to creation of Family Life Office

Janeé Bernal

By Dave Myers
Southwest Kansas Catholic

In the office belonging to Janeé Bernal at the Catholic Chancery in Dodge City, there is a small shelf with few items dedicated to the Beatles.

    With a son named JohnPaul, it’s not uncommon for Bernal, director of the new Diocesan Office of Matrimony, Family Life and Natural Family Planning, to feel the need to mention that, no, he was not named after two of the Fab Four.

“I’m a huge fan of the Beatles,” Bernal admits with a wide smile. “But JohnPaul was named after the pope.”

As if to add his own personal testimony, there is a life-sized cutout of John Paul II standing in a corner of her office.

Bernal, who resides with her husband and three children in Garden City, was hired as a direct result of the generosity of local Catholics through the Vibrant Ministries – Uniting Our Church Appeal. The Most Rev. John B. Brungardt has long felt the need for an office dedicated to the family, and through the kindness of local Catholics, he is seeing it come to fruition.

“We are blessed to have Janeé as director of this important office,” Bishop Brungardt said. “She has the teaching skills, the love of the Lord, and a heart for family life that will serve the diocese well.”

The bishop has dedicated this first year of Bernal’s employment as a year of self-formation, she explained.

“I’ll begin by learning how to serve in this ministry by completing pastoral ministry classes and attending numerous conferences and training sessions.”

It’s a tall order. She’ll be serving in a capacity that would typically utilize a separate person for each ministry. And this is why Bernal will be relying on the kindness – and stewardship -- of strangers.

“The vision is that I will oversee these components -- Matrimony, Family Life and Natural Family Planning,” Bernal explained. “Eventually, I’ll be meeting with the parishes to learn what their specific needs are.  Then I’ll be seeking out and recruiting mentor couples for Natural Family Planning and marriage preparation to teach at their parish.

“Pope Francis said that family is key to re-invigorating our Church,” Bernal added. “We must put the emphasis on the family again. That’s the only way to put families in the pews -- to make sure families are intact. I’ll be finding out what the needs are in the parishes and finding resources to strengthen family life.”

Prior to her hiring, she served for six years as Assistant Professor of Education at the Newman University Western Kansas Outreach Center in Dodge City. Before that, she taught for eight years in public education in Garden City.

She has earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Elementary Education from K-State, and a Master’s Degree in Education with an emphasis on ESOL (English to Speakers of Other Languages) from Fort Hays State University.

It was while attending diocesan youth events such as TEC (Teens Encounter Christ) and high school mission trips that she met her future husband, Jesse, now a Garden City high school teacher.

“I credit [former Diocesan Youth Director] Steve Polley and LeaAnn Scott for us meeting,” she said.

Janeé and Jesse have three children, JohnPaul, 7, Gabriella, 4, both of whom attend St. Dominic School, and Jude, 1. Bernal’s mother and father reside in Great Bend, and she has extended family in Leoti and Marienthal.

She learned about the chancery position after a conversation with her doctor, who lamented the limited availability of NFP programs. He encouraged her to seek ways that she might be of service. This was the same day that the job listing was placed on the diocesan website.

It was a whirlwind experience. After being hired, she was sent to the National Association of Catholic Family Life Ministers in Lafayette, La. There she learned that “there are so many people in other dioceses who are wanting and willing to help. It was so powerful.”

And she learned a second powerful lesson that she will take with her throughout her ministry:

“Two of the keynote speakers, Dr. Greg and Lisa Popcak, said that every single day, every single family should work, play, talk and pray together. It’s so simple. It will strengthen your family.

“I have a teacher’s heart, but a heart for ministry, as well,” Bernal concluded. “So, this is a good mix. I feel very honored to be able to fill this office at the diocesan level after so many years of not having anyone dedicated to this ministry full-time.”

 

 

 

New faces at the Catholic Chancery

 Heidy Ramirez

By Dave Myers
Southwest Kansas Catholic

   When asked what hobbies she enjoys, Heidy Ramirez, the new Database and Development Assistant for the Catholic Chancery, thought for a moment and replied, “We love watching movies.”

    Old movies? Contemporary? Westerns?

“Hindi,” she answered with a smile.

“You mean Bollywood?”

“We love the music, and they have good messages ....”

Being a mother of six, the Dodge City resident wants her family to have positive influences. This is one of the reasons why she accepted the position at the Catholic Chancery.

“The environment – the spirituality – is very important to my family,” she said of her new position. “It’s not just a job, but a ministry — helping my Church.”

She will serve under the supervision of the Office of Development, directed by Mark Roth. Her primary role will be to coordinate and maintain all aspects of the donor system for the Diocesan database (Donor Perfect).

Ramirez replaces outgoing assistant, Susan Wrinn Flax (see below).

Ramirez moved to Dodge City with her parents, Bertha and Luis de Luna, and her two brothers, from Juarez, Mexico at age 14. She graduated Dodge City High School in 1997 and began attending Dodge City Community College.

At 19, she met and married Carlos Ramirez. The couples’ six children range in age from 18 to a toddler who will turn 2 in September.

She previously served in financial services for a Wichita company for one year. Before that, she worked for three years at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe.

It’s a good guess that her parents, who teach marriage support classes, instilled in their daughter a certain sense of humor, even about a sacrament as important as marriage.

“I was telling Father Wesley [Schawe] that the 19 years I’ve been married seem like only five minutes,” she explained. “When Father Wesley said, ‘That’s wonderful!’ I added, “…under water.” Ramirez broke into laughter, knowing the absurdity of the statement, especially when it comes to her blessed marriage to Carlos.

Ramirez serves as a Natural Family Planning teacher, providing lessons on the Billings Ovulation Method. She and Carlos sing in the choir at Mass. In fact, it’s rare to attend any diocesan function at the cathedral and not see Heidy or Carlos, or both of them, involved in some capacity.

“I think I’m going to like it here,” she said two days into her new job at the chancery. “I’m here to help in any way. I like helping people.”     

 

 

New faces at the Catholic Chancery

 Diana Ramirez

By Dave Myers
Southwest Kansas Catholic

Courage and faith can be synonymous at times.

Diana Ramirez, a Dodge City resident and mother of two — Bernardo, 2, and Andres, due in September — recently left a job she enjoyed as secretary at Sacred Heart Cathedral School to accept a year-long internship at the Catholic chancery.

“I feel like it was a leap of faith,” the 27-year-old said. “I had to trust. Who knows where it will take me? I have no plans, I just have to trust in God that it will all work out.”

The position will require her to work in three primary ministries: Young adult ministry with director, Gentry Heimerman; youth ministry with director Adam Urban; and the newly formed Matrimony and Family Life Ministry with newly hired director, Janeé Bernal.

“Those three will be my main focus, but I’ll collaborate with other ministries when the need arises,” she said.

The Mexico native came to the United States while in the first grade. For 20 years she has lived in Dodge City. Her mother, Maria Gomez,  has since died; she has a father, Nestor Melendez, two brothers, Kevin and Nestor H. Melendez, a sister, Lizbeth Moon and is married to Andres Ramirez.

Besides serving three primary ministries for the diocese—as well as preparing to give birth to her second child—she is currently earning a certificate in Pastoral Ministry through the diocese ITV program, as well as working toward a bachelor’s degree in Pastoral Ministry from Newman University.  She is also in a formation and discernment process to become a member of the Comunidad Siervos de Cristo Vivo (CSCV).

“Servants of Living Christ is a community of laity that was born in the feelings of the Sacred Heart of Jesus for man,” she said. “Eight years of experience in the love of God and in preaching inspired Rev. Father Emiliano Tardiff, M.S.C., Maria Armenteros and Evaristo Guzman to found a community that contemplates, evangelizes and transforms.”

She has earned an Associate of Arts Degree in psychology from Dodge City Community College. She also has a great love for music ministry, a skill that will undoubtedly be utilized at various diocesan functions.

“One of my biggest hopes in serving the diocese is to share my love of family life – a whole life appreciation — acknowledging the gift of life in the womb and in every person we encounter so that we may come closer as brothers and sisters in Christ.” Ramirez said. 

“I have to be open to why God has opened this door. He has a reason. I want to learn from everyone here and learn what God wants of me.”

 

 

 

 

Bishop Gilmore honored for 20 years of episcopal ministry

By Dave Myers
Southwest Kansas Catholic

Anyone who has been offered that big promotion only to face a sudden realization that you’re not quite sure it’s a step you feel prepared to take, can begin to understand how then-Msgr. Ronald M. Gilmore felt the day he learned he was to become bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Dodge City.

“The days leading up to that ordination were hard days for me physically and emotionally,” he told friends gathered at St. Andrew Parish Center in Wright to celebrate his 20th anniversary as a bishop.

“I remember the night before, sleep was very fitful. The next morning, I was really feeling miserable. I was out of sorts. My stomach was churning.  I really didn’t know if I was going to be able to make it through the ceremony.

“So, I prayed for the Lord to help me get through it,” he said. 

One of Bishop Gilmore’s redeeming characteristics has been his blunt honesty about his own insecurities. When housed amid his deep faith, these admissions became a saving grace for the multitude of souls who’ve struggled with their own search for faith amid struggles — a multitude of people who found strength from the bishop’s words and example.

Bishop Emeritus Gilmore was honored July 16 by the Most Rev. John B. Brungardt, several priests and Religious of the diocese, and numerous friends, at a dinner reception at St. Andrew Church in Wright. The evening began with vespers, followed by a reception and dinner hosted by the St. Andrew Altar Society, Wright Council of the Knights of Columbus, and the St. Andrew Vocations Commission.

After the roast beef dinner, Bishop Gilmore drew howls of laughter as he recalled the moments leading up to his ordination:

“I had to take the oath that we bishops have to take,” he told those gathered. “The nuncio had about a 42-page prayer in Latin, and I had to read through this.

“I knew this about the nuncio: he had an aversion to air-conditioning. When he told me that I was selected to be the bishop of Dodge City, he was in a non-air-conditioned room at the Spiritual Life Center in Wichita.”

It was a hot day to begin with, the bishop said. Combined with his tattered nerves and lack of sleep, the lengthy reading became a bit like a verbal obstacle course.

“I went through this oath, reading it word for word in Latin, and I’m dripping on the paper,” the bishop said to laughter.

At his table at the parish center in Wright sat Father Jack Maes, who smiled and nodded at the memory, the priest having been in the room those two decades ago when the future Bishop Gilmore read the long document.

“It was a difficult time leading up to the ordination,” Bishop Gilmore said. “During the ordination, though, about half-way through, we reached the point of the laying-on of hands, and … I can’t say that I was aware of anything happening. Nothing was perceptible to me.

“But somehow, in some way, without my being aware of it, I was suddenly strengthened. All the rest of that melted away.”

The soft-spoken Bishop Gilmore led the diocese in the construction of a new cathedral. Through his many deanery meetings and gatherings at churches throughout the diocese, he sought to “bring people into the family of the diocese. It was a great thing for me to meet the people in that way.

“I told people I wasn’t interested in their money, that I was interested in their souls. And the priests always pushed back and said, ‘Bishop, be high-minded on your own time! We’re trying to pay a few bills here!’” he said to more laughter.

“Of course, that’s true. I was interested in their souls, although I would tell them that I cannot have your souls if you hoard your money!”

A year or so after Bishop Gilmore retired, he met Jacqueline Loh, founder of “Grace that Reigns Society,” which presents retreats designed to “renew your sense of wonder in your love and relationship with Jesus.” The two began touring the country and Canada giving retreats. Their most recent retreat was in Hugoton to a nearly filled church.

“I want to thank Bishop Brungardt for welcoming Grace that Reigns into the diocese and for letting us be a part of the mission of the diocese,” Bishop Gilmore said.

Words said upon Bishop Gilmore’s 2010 retirement stand just as true today: “I can never thank God enough for these Dodge City years,” he said. “And they are not yet ended. And other surprises are yet to come.”

Weakness in us is strength in Christ

By John Stang
Seminarian, Diocese of Dodge City

“Find your own Calcutta.”

These are the wise words of St. Mother Teresa. She knew that we do not have to travel across the globe to be missionaries of Christ; it usually starts in our own communities.

I found my Calcutta.  The last two summers, I served on the Totus Tuus and Prayer and Action teams, respectively, for the Diocese of Dodge City.  Seminarians frequently are assigned to these missions. I discovered these programs to be very spiritually rewarding and a great opportunity to serve Christ in others. I encourage all college students, particularly those who grew up in the Catholic Diocese of Dodge City, to apply for team member positions.

Totus Tuus, Latin for “Totally Yours,” is a Catholic vacation Bible school that started in the Wichita diocese 31 years ago.  From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., the team of four teach lessons to children, first through sixth grade.  Usually, those lessons cover a mystery of the rosary, biblical history, and Catholic saints, with fun activities incorporated. 

In the evening, the middle and high school portion of the program begins.  Team members play games with the youth upon arrival and give testimonials about how their Catholic faith has shaped their lives.  The team moves to a different parish each week, staying with host families, along with eating with a different family each evening. 

Prayer and Action, which began in the Salina Diocese over a decade ago, is for high school and college students.  The team works in two parishes, often painting houses, doing yard work, and other manual labor tasks requested by community members in need.  The missionaries, the team and participants, usually stay at the parish center.  During the day, everyone goes to the worksites and then returns in the evening to cook meals.  The night portion, called Collatio (latin for ‘come together’), is when the team performs skits and each team member rotates in giving a talk. For instance, I gave talks about prayer and discernment. 

Initially, upon hearing the news that I would serve on these teams, I was a little nervous about my perceived weaknesses.  I don’t have a background in teaching nor am I a handy person.  Moreover, I was assigned to managing the kitchen for Prayer and Action, despite the fact that I was barely able to cook for myself, and I became a team leader for Totus Tuus without participating in the program beforehand.  Growing up in the Dodge City Diocese, I had not experienced either of these programs.  So, I did not know much about the structure of either one. 

I’m guessing that concerns about one’s weaknesses are probably a stumbling block for most applicants.

However, if we are called to serve, we must trust in God’s providence that He will provide.  This summer, I reflected on the words of St. Paul, “My grace is sufficient for you, for power is made perfect in weakness.  I will rather boast most gladly of my weaknesses, in order that the power of Christ may dwell with me.” (2 Cor. 12:7-10). 

Our weaknesses are where Jesus can give us the most strength to complete the task at hand.  You might pleasantly surprise yourself at what you can do.  Sometimes, it takes others to notice what we don’t see in ourselves.  Parents, encourage your children.  Grandparents, ask your grandchildren.  Previous team members, tell your friends about the experiences you had.  We must be like Jesus and invite others to serve.

Certainly, there will be long hours, moments of frustration, and other challenges.  But it was worth it for all the amazing moments.  Witnessing a child be excited about learning a new piece of the faith, noticing the smile of a homeowner who is excited to see their house reshaped into something new and beautiful, talking to teenagers about discerning their vocations, or seeing a kid have the time of their life during a water fight, I will always treasure these moments.  If you feel the call to serve as a missionary, God will show you your own moments of joy that you can cherish for the rest of your life.

 

 

 

 

Past Issues

May 5, 2019

April 21, 2019

Easter Sunday

April 7, 2019

March 24, 2019

March 10, 2019

Feb. 24, 2019

Feb. 10, 2019

Jan. 27, 2019

Jan. 13, 2019

Dec. 23, 2018

Dec. 9, 2018

Nov. 25, 2018

Nov. 11, 2018

Oct. 28, 2018

Oct. 14, 2018

Sept. 16, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: 2018 Golf Classic; student athletes; physically challenged; Leonard Stegman; Lesson in forgiveness; Sending us on a mission

Sept. 2, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Priest crisis; Scandal; Opioid addictions; Seeds of Suicide; Leightons; St. Anne; Vincke; seminarians; Dominican Sisters; Stewardship Conference; Dead Sea Scrolls; PSR programs; Roe V. Wade

 

August 12, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Prayer and Action; Totus Tuus; Janee Bernal; Diana Ramirez; Heidy Ramirez; Bishop Gilmore honored for 20 years ministry; suicide; contraception and abortion; Dead Sea Scrolls; Humanae Vitae; certification in youth ministry; Chuck Weber; Cathedral rectory chapel; Sister Viola Heichelbech; Adam Urban

July 15, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Immigration Protest/Rally; Faith and Light Fiesta; Seeing the Dead Sea Scrolls; Corpus Christi procession; Prayers for priests; Sisters turn 100; Michael Brungardt; Gerald Vincke; Massacre in San Salvador; Action for Alex 

 

June 3, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Parish Pray for Priestly Vocations; Appeal reaches $10 million; Gangs; Seminarians; Pam Willis; Why I like being a priest; Happy Father's Day; Patricia Lujan; Tyler and Rachel Bennett; Adoption Protection Act.

May 20, 2018
KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Track meet; Beloved Sinners; Benjamin Martin retires; Smiles; Future of Fortune Telling; Hoisington mission; DofI; Getting Equipped; Spring Social; First Communion; Confirmation
KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Track meet; Beloved Sinners; Benjamin Martin retires; Smiles; Future of Fortune Telling; Hoisington mission; DofI; Getting Equipped; Spring Social; First Communion; Confirmation

May 6, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Archbishop Romero; Seeing, Touching, Tasting; Exhortation; Father Patrick Conroy; Happy Mother's Day; A child on your doorstep; Vibrant Ministries Grant; From the heart of a young father; Love Gives Life; Roman Holiday; Smartphone; retirement
Fossil Hunting

 

April 15, 2018

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Easter Vigil; Angelica Village; Colorado woman; The art of anger; Cimarron Couple; Staats; Adoption; 

Father Ultan Murphy anniversary; Coughlan; Spiritual Advisor to Hoodlums; Woman of Courage; Oration contest; Darcy Feist  

 

April 1, 2018

 

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Defending Adoption; Led by the Spirit; Knights; ABC Pregnancy Center;
Memorial of Mary; Homeless; Relics; Down syndrome abortion; Chrism Mass

 

March 18, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: SKYAC; Aleksandr Men; Fasting for Priestly Vocations; Uganda; School for deaf; Rannah Evetts; Oberle; Rachel and Doug Trombley; Oscar Romero; Paul VI; DACA

 

 

March 4, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Fasting for priestly vocations; Father Juan; Fasting and prayer;
Quest Weekend 2018; DACA; With God, anything is possible; Homelessness in our communities; Rhubarb, Kansas;
What's the point of fasting; Rite of Election; same-sex couples

 

Feb. 18, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Catholic Schools Week; Rachel Doll; Ellinwood; Great Bend; Garden City; Ness City; Dodge City; Sister Rita Schwarzenberger; Nigeria; Bishop Hermes; Fasting for Priestly Vocations; World Day for Consecrated Life; 50th Anniversary St. Dominic School; What will life be like in 50 years?

 

 

Feb. 4, 2018

 

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: March for Life; Tracy and Ross Smith; Adoption; Vibrant Ministries; Faith and Light;
Pro-Life; Mortal sin to discard elderly; DACA; Abortion; Dreamers; Human Trafficking

 

Jan. 21, 2018

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Louise Korbe; Anne Frank; Miep Gies; Home Heat; Father Solanus

 

Jan. 7, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Good news and kingdom living; dreamers; Sister Teresa Orozco; Infant Adoption; Elderly; a moral conundrum; seminarian; feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe

 

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

 

Site by Solutio