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June 9, 2019

 

May 19, 2019

 

 

 

 

    The Dead Sea Scrolls series

 

   St. Nicholas School, Kinsley, Advent Cantata, Dec. 7, 2008

 

   

 

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Seeing the Scrolls

(See photos here)

By Charlene Scott Myers
Southwest Kansas Catholic

I have written several stories about the Dead Sea scrolls since I floated years ago in the sea’s thickly salt-clogged waters, looking up at the cliff caves where the scrolls were found in Israel.

But never did I think I actually would see the scrolls with my own eyes, which happened recently when my husband Dave and I visited an exhibit of 10 of 20 scrolls displayed at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science in downtown Denver. (The other 10 scrolls were displayed at a different time.)

The scrolls had never before been on public display, and span nearly 185 years, with copies made as early as 125 BCE.  The Isaiah scroll is one of the latest copies discovered.

The building was clogged with the curious public, but a kindly man from the museum gave us a private tour, explaining the history of each scroll on display as we strolled past these remains of antiquity.

The scrolls had been written and stuffed into large jars by religious men—Essene monks—a sect of Second Temple Judaism who fled the attacks of Jews and others in Jerusalem and lived in a desert community they named Qumran that was destroyed in 68 CE (Christian Era). More than 900 remarkably preserved scrolls were recovered.

During my visit to Israel, some of my companions and I climbed the huge rocks leading up to one of the caves and peered into the darkest darkness I’ve ever seen.  Of course, there were no pots or parchment of any sort left inside the cave.

Discovered by a young Bedouin boy in 1947 when his goat scampered up the rocks and into one of the caves, the huge pots we saw at the museum contained manuscripts of the Book of Isaiah, older by a thousand years than any previously known Hebrew copy of the Old Testament! The Book of Isaiah is one of the more common Dead Sea scroll texts.

The dawn of civilization arose in the region of Israel more than a million years ago and became the birthplace of some of the world’s leading religions.  There are more than 30,000 known archaeological sites throughout Israel, a tiny sliver of land that can be crossed by car from top to bottom in only four hours!

The Denver museum featured 2,000-year-old parchments and scraps of parchments found in Israel’s caves above the Dead Sea between 1947 and 1956.  Following their discovery, historians in the 1950s pieced the scraps back together using cellophane tape.

The majority of the scrolls are non-Biblical, representing religious legal writings, prayer texts and predictions of a future apocalypse. Even recipes are included among the scrolls!

Some 1,200 silver shekels (coins) were unearthed at Qumran, and many copies of the Book of Isaiah were discovered in the caves. A few were on display at the exhibit, as were a pair of leather sandals worn by one of the Jewish rebels who fought in vain against Roman forces and chose to kill their families and themselves rather than surrender at the nearby desert fortress of Masada in 73 CE.

The Jewish religious men at Qumran believed the last days were coming at any time, and readied themselves by prayer, study and cleanliness, bathing twice a day in small pools of water.  Qumran was destroyed in 68 CE (Christian Era), but when we visited the area, we walked among the rooms of its stony remains as we did at the better preserved mountain fortress of Masada.

Among the ancient pieces of pottery from Israel displayed at the Denver museum were huge collared-rim storage jars called “Pithos,” dating from the Iron Age I (11th century BCE).  These enormous pots were found in the remains of four-room houses in Canaan’s central hill country.

As for the scrolls on exhibit at the museum, 27 percent were written in Greek, although 10 scrolls were copies of the Hebrew community’s writings. NASA has a digital library where a digitized process allows viewers to “see writings we never could see before.”

A discovery made in Cave 4 in 1952 produced a “War Rule,” a six-line fragment, known as the Sefer ha-Milhamah, commonly referred to as the “Pierced Messiah” text, which refers to a Messiah from the Branch of David (whom we know as our Savior Jesus Christ), and also to a judgment and a killing, both of which He experienced.

One Hebrew scroll on parchment includes as many as 51 psalms, but their order does not correspond to the present version of the Hebrew Bible, and the scroll contains psalms not found in the present version. 

The text names King David as author of the psalms, reinforcing his reputation as the greatest of poets!

One scroll contains a lease agreement belonging to Eliezer ben Shmuel, a farmer who lived in Ein Gedi. (I visited this small part of Israel that looks like Paradise, and we have named a picnic area in our backyard “Ein Gedi!). The land changing hands in Israel was owned by the government of Simeon Bar Kokhba, leader of the Second Jewish Revolt against the Romans (132-135 CE). The document refers to Bar Kokhba as the “Prince of Israel.”

One parchment, the book of Enoch, was written in Aramaic and found in Cave 4, dating back to between 100 and 50 BCE.  Enoch is mentioned in the book of Genesis, where he is reported to “Walk with God,” as we all would like to walk.

 

 

 

A Faith and Light Fiesta!

(See photos here)

By Dave Myers
Southwest Kansas Catholic

The Faith and Light program of the Diocese of Dodge City, which celebrates the gifts of those who are developmentally or intellectually challenged, concluded its most recent season with a Mexican Fiesta at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe in Dodge City.

   All parishioners were invited to this special celebration, which included dance, games, giveaways, a belated Easter-egg hunt, a piñata, and a not-so-Mexican dinner (but delicious just the same) of hamburgers and hotdogs.

   Attending the Fiesta were Bishop John Brungardt and Father Aneesh Parappanattu, cathedral parochial vicar.

   Led by Virginia and Frank Samayo, Faith and Light creates an embracing atmosphere of acceptance of each other, regardless of one’s challenges.

   At its core is praise for a loving Lord, creating an environment where people facing developmental and intellectual challenges, their family and friends, can meet once each month for prayer, song, skits, fun activities, and a pot luck.

    Dance troops at the celebration included the Tepeyac Dancers and the Folkloric Dancers. The meal was provided by the Knights of Columbus.

Taking 'Action for Alex'

Honoring a fallen friend by helping others

(See photos here)

By Dave Myers
Southwest Kansas Catholic

KINSLEY — Of this you can be sure: Alex Gleason is smiling down from Heaven.

From June 13-15, dozens of people joined to celebrate the memory of this young man by helping others — a fitting way to honor Gleason, who died two years ago on July 20, and who “always had a smile on his face.”

“Alex was always happy; he was always smiling,” said Caitlin Herrmann, who, with her father, John, started “Action for Alex” last year. Alex was a year ahead of Caitlin at Kinsley High School. 

“Gosh, he was one of the nicest people I knew. He never had a mean thing to say about anyone.”

Gleason died on July 20, 2016. He was 18 years old.

“I was at ‘Prayer and Action’ when I heard about Alex’s death,” Caitlin said.

“Prayer and Action” is a diocesan program for young adults which has them going to the homes of people in need where they beautify the house and property, and help in other unexpected ways.

“That’s where I got the idea for ‘Action for Alex,’” she explained. Unlike “Prayer and Action,” which is diocesan wide, “Action for Alex” is focused in the Kinsley community where Alex was reared.

It is a celebration of the life of one of their own by focusing efforts on the community of which he was a part.

“We worked on one house near St. Nicholas Church,” Caitlin said of the 27 youth volunteers and nearly as many adults. “We painted it, did yard work, took down trees. A family donated a swing and a table set. Another person donated flowers. It looks really nice.”

The homeowner wasn’t content to sit back and watch, noted adult volunteer, Kayla Gleason, whose daughter accompanied Alex to his junior prom. 

“She came out and asked what she could do,” Kayla said of the homeowner. “She helped us to spray paint. Her grandchildren came out and helped, too.

“Alex was very polite, a very nice kid. His whole family is nice.”

When work on the house was completed, the volunteers took their time and talent to the Palace Theater in Kinsley, a jewel on the prairie of southwest Kansas.

Called “...one of the finest examples of shoebox theater design,” the historic theater was constructed in 1917 and still houses original hand-painted fire curtains. One of two such theaters known to exist, the structure is on the National Register of Historic Places.

“We repainted the theater,” Caitlin said. “Because it’s a historic site, we had to match the original color. Jimmy Heinz built a new candy counter. We have a lot of people in town who volunteered to work. I think’s that’s cool.”

The theater shows movies each Friday, Saturday and Sunday. For the current schedule, visit facebook.com/KinsleyPalaceTheatre/.

PRIDE, a Kinsley organization designed to support community projects, donated food, the wood for the theater, as well as paint for the house and glass for the candy counter. Sherwin Williams was “very generous” in the donation of paint. One of the dinners for the volunteers was provided by the Ladies League, while the Knights of Columbus hosted the second night’s dinner. Community volunteers also brought a kiddie-pool/slip-‘n-slide game, which must have felt tremendous after a hot day at work.

“Lots of people gave us snacks,” Caitlin said. “The community really helped out and was real supportive. They wanted to see it happen.”

Martin Gleason, Alex’s father, took part in the work effort as well.

“It was unbelievable what the kids got done in three days; it was truly amazing. We were really happy with the results.”

A 2016 graduate of Kinsley High School, Alex was a member of the Trenton Workers 4-H Club and the Offerle Fire Department. He was working on earning his private pilot’s license at the time of his death.  

“We were very, very proud of him,” Martin said. Alex is also survived by his mother, Jennifer, siblings Brett and Caitlen, grandparents James and Rosanna Gleason and Doug and Saundra McGraw, and many aunts, uncles and cousins.

The event concluded with a community block party, which included a potluck dinner and a powerpoint presentation at the St. Nicholas Parish Hall, featuring the past days’ efforts.

 

 

 

And baby makes … one big happy family!

By Dave Myers
Southwest Kansas Catholic

The baby boy slept peacefully – warm and fed, surrounded by two loving parents and a pug named Doug (who seems to live in a constant state of bliss-seeking) – in the Dodge City living room of Tracy and Ross Smith.

You might remember the couple from a February issue of the SKC. Theirs was one of a series of stories about couples seeking to adopt a child through Catholic Charities of Southwest Kansas Adoption Program.

In April, the prayers of Ross and Tracy and an abundance of friends and family were answered, thanks to a very brave young woman in New Mexico.

“Catholic Charities called us in April and said that there was an expectant mother who had seen our profile,” Tracy said. “We were pretty guarded. We had been presented with possibilities in the past that hadn’t worked out. It didn’t start to feel real until 10 days before we were leaving for New Mexico to meet [our possible] future child.”

Once in New Mexico, they found a young pregnant woman determined to give her child the best life that she could envision. For her, the dog-loving, hard-working, family-oriented, and, most importantly, deeply faith-filled couple from Dodge City couldn’t have been a better choice. She wanted her baby to have a similar upbringing as she’d known.

The birth-mother is originally from Kansas and attended Kansas State University, where Ross and Tracy met. She recently moved to a scenic mountainous region in New Mexico with a population of less than 500 people. And although the three had never met before, it’s a town that just happens to have been the vacation destination of Ross and his family for many years. “It’s a very strong connection,” Ross said. “And it really sealed the deal. It felt like it was meant to be.”

On May 25th, Layton Anthony was born.  “His birth mother had asked us to be there for his birth,” Tracy said. “It was an honor to be there, and a very special experience.”

The couple and the expectant mom even worked together on a name. Layton comes from a special uncle of Ross’s, and Anthony is named after the birth mother’s grandfather, whom she adored.

Because Layton was born outside of Kansas, it took three weeks for the states to clear the red tape that allowed the Smiths to bring little Layton back to Dodge City.

Which also meant that the couple had three weeks to get to know the birth-mom and members of her family.

“We saw her regularly, and continued developing our relationship with her,” Tracy explained. “It was really special for us.”

As one could imagine, the joyful event became quickly bittersweet when the time came to part ways and head back to Kansas.

“It really sunk in,” Tracy said. “and we felt her pain when it came time to head home.”

Thanks to the Catholic Charities of Southwest Kansas open adoption system, the birth-mother and her family will never be cut off from the child, as in days past. She will be akin to a special aunt figure in Layton’s life, Tracy said. In fact, her whole family is now a part of ours, the Smiths said. Something sadly unimaginable in the old days.

“Since we’re family, Layton will know his birth-mom and family,” Ross commented. “He will know that he was loved from the beginning.”

“Layton’s birth-mom was really brave,” Ross added. “She was determined that he would have two loving parents. She never wavered.”

And certainly, it helped the birth-mom to know that little Layton is not lost in the sad mystery of the adoption netherworld of yesteryear, and is instead with two loving parents she’s gotten to know and appreciate well — and with whom, the night before the SKC interview, she shared a face-to-face video chat online.

“To Ross and me, she’s really special. Because of her decision, we became parents. She placed Layton’s needs ahead of her own, even though it was not easy.”

“It was a tough process,” Ross said of the adoption, “but we would do it all over again.”

“Catholic Charities really took care of us,” Tracy added. “We were lucky to have them guiding us through this process. And we feel very blessed to have Layton and his birth family in our lives.”

 

For more information about adoption services at Catholic Charities, contact
Lori Titsworth at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or by phone at 620-792-1393.

 

Urging prayer, pressing for action

Diocese joins thousands across country in raising voices for separated families

(PHOTOS from the Rally)

By Dave Myers
Southwest Kansas Catholic

It was an appeal to the better angels of our nature, an urging that more than 3,000 immigrant families who have been forcefully separated at the border in recent months be quickly and safely reunited.

On June 30, dozens of people gathered in a grassy, tree-lined area next to the Dodge City Medical Center to voice their opposition to family separations, to urge those in power to expedite the rejoining immigrant families, and to pray for the families affected and the policy-makers.

It was one of scores of rallies that took place across the country.

“As people of faith, we know that we must speak and act on behalf of those who have no voice,” said Georgina Paz, an employee of the Catholic Diocese of Dodge City, and one of the organizers of the event. “Every person has a fundamental right to life and dignity. We believe every person is precious.”

The rally was organized by the Catholic Diocese of Dodge City with the support of the First United Methodist Church of Dodge City and St. Catherine Hospital. Speakers included Rev. Jerre Nolte of First United Methodist Church, who gave the invocation, Rev. Juan Espinoza, also of First United Methodist Church, and Father Robert Schremmer, vicar general of the Catholic Diocese.

Dennis McKinney, former Kansas State Treasurer, gave a particularly impassioned address:

“… I think the vast majority of us agree that our country has to do things to protect us from violence and acts of terrorism,” McKinney said. “We have to have a secure border. We have to have a conversation about how we bolster other nations so that people don’t have to flee here. It’s essential to understand that safety and security can be achieved.”

But it must be achieved, he said, without separating families and violating our most basic values and traditions.

“I think we’re alarmed because we see our nation ... taking children away from their parents. … And these actions are being taken against people, many of whom have been fleeing some of the most dire circumstances known.”

 McKinney continued: “…In the 9th chapter of Luke, Jesus reminds us that the greatest commandment is to love God with all of our heart, with all of our soul, with all of our mind, with all of our strength, and the that the second greatest commandment is to love our neighbor as ourselves.

“…It’s imperative that we shout from the highest rooftop the words that God gives us from the apostle John: If you do not love, you do not know God, because God is love.”

Rev. Nolte prayed that God would “turn our eyes to the other that we may see you, and see you in our neighbor.

“Help us to see each other as beloved children, eternally with you,” he said. “Turn our ears to the other that we may hear their cries as you hear ours—with compassion, and tenderness that draws us closer in the midst of suffering. Help us to hear the other as your beloved child. … And Lord, turn our hearts to you and to the other, that those things that might divide are abandoned….”

Before praying a litany of intercession, Rev. Esponiza said, “As people of God, it’s our responsibility to seek justice for our neighbors….”

As cars zoomed by on Central Ave., David McHugh, youth minister at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe in Dodge City, and Diane Ramirez, performed “God Bless America,” and the “Prayer of St. Francis,” their voices booming across loud speakers.

Many people sat in the shade on lounge chairs, while others stood throughout the gathering, at times breaking into applause.

Coleen Stein of the Catholic diocese offered a stark reminder of the vision of America’s founders when she recited “The New Colossus,” the poem written by Emma Lazarus in 1883 that is emblazoned on the Statue of Liberty. 

The closing song became at once a song of hope as well as a tribute to a day that drew together young and old, and people of various races and religions. After the benediction by Father Schremmer, everyone stood and joined in singing “America the Beautiful.”

Scores of faithful process 3.5 miles through Dodge City, providing

A powerful witness to the ‘Body of Christ’

(PHOTOS from the Procession)

By DAVE MYERS
Southwest Kansas Catholic

Some 200 to 300 people — children, moms pushing baby carriages, youth and elderly — celebrated the Feast of Corpus Christi June 3 with a 3.5-mile procession through the streets of Dodge City.

The procession began at Sacred Heart Cathedral and concluded at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe.

It was at once a prayer for priestly vocations, for women and men religious, families and youth, for conversion, and a prayer for world peace.

But perhaps most importantly, it was a witness of the Body and community of Christ to a multitude of people who sat outside their homes or parked along the road to view the impressive sight.

In the lead was a pickup truck packed with singers led by Cathedral youth director and recording artist David McHugh, whose powerful voice echoed through the streets.

Another truck pulled a makeshift altar on which a different priest prayed before the Blessed Sacrament between each of five prayer services.

The five altars were set up in public view along the route, such as in front of the Dodge City Medical Center and the parking lot of a mall.

Bishop John Brungardt rode the final leg of the journey, concluding at the cathedral with a prayer service in Spanish and English.

Entre 200 y 300 personas (niños, mamás empujando sus carritos de bebé, jóvenes y ancianos) celebraron la Fiesta de Corpus Christi el 3 de junio con una procesión de 3,5 millas por las calles de Dodge City.
La procesión comenzó en la Catedral del Sagrado Corazón y concluyó en la Catedral de Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe.
Fue a la vez una oración por las vocaciones sacerdotales; por los religiosos y religiosas; las familias y los jóvenes; por la conversión; y una oración por la paz mundial.
Pero quizás lo más importante, fue un testimonio del Cuerpo y la comunidad de Cristo ante una multitud de personas que se sentaron afuera de sus casas o estacionaron a lo largo del camino para apreciar esta vista impresionante.
A la cabeza estaba una camioneta llena de cantantes dirigidos por el director juvenil de la Catedral y artista de grabación David McHugh, cuya poderosa voz resonó por las calles.
Otro camión sacó un altar improvisado en el que un sacerdote diferente rezaba ante el Santísimo Sacramento entre cada uno de los cinco servicios de oración.
Los cinco altares se colocaron a la vista del público a lo largo de la ruta, como frente al Dodge City Medical Center y el estacionamiento de un centro comercial.
El obispo, Mons. John Brungardt montó la última etapa del viaje, concluyendo en la catedral con un servicio de oración en español e inglés.

Past Issues

May 5, 2019

April 21, 2019

Easter Sunday

April 7, 2019

March 24, 2019

March 10, 2019

Feb. 24, 2019

Feb. 10, 2019

Jan. 27, 2019

Jan. 13, 2019

Dec. 23, 2018

Dec. 9, 2018

Nov. 25, 2018

Nov. 11, 2018

Oct. 28, 2018

Oct. 14, 2018

Sept. 16, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: 2018 Golf Classic; student athletes; physically challenged; Leonard Stegman; Lesson in forgiveness; Sending us on a mission

Sept. 2, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Priest crisis; Scandal; Opioid addictions; Seeds of Suicide; Leightons; St. Anne; Vincke; seminarians; Dominican Sisters; Stewardship Conference; Dead Sea Scrolls; PSR programs; Roe V. Wade

 

August 12, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Prayer and Action; Totus Tuus; Janee Bernal; Diana Ramirez; Heidy Ramirez; Bishop Gilmore honored for 20 years ministry; suicide; contraception and abortion; Dead Sea Scrolls; Humanae Vitae; certification in youth ministry; Chuck Weber; Cathedral rectory chapel; Sister Viola Heichelbech; Adam Urban

July 15, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Immigration Protest/Rally; Faith and Light Fiesta; Seeing the Dead Sea Scrolls; Corpus Christi procession; Prayers for priests; Sisters turn 100; Michael Brungardt; Gerald Vincke; Massacre in San Salvador; Action for Alex 

 

June 3, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Parish Pray for Priestly Vocations; Appeal reaches $10 million; Gangs; Seminarians; Pam Willis; Why I like being a priest; Happy Father's Day; Patricia Lujan; Tyler and Rachel Bennett; Adoption Protection Act.

May 20, 2018
KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Track meet; Beloved Sinners; Benjamin Martin retires; Smiles; Future of Fortune Telling; Hoisington mission; DofI; Getting Equipped; Spring Social; First Communion; Confirmation
KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Track meet; Beloved Sinners; Benjamin Martin retires; Smiles; Future of Fortune Telling; Hoisington mission; DofI; Getting Equipped; Spring Social; First Communion; Confirmation

May 6, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Archbishop Romero; Seeing, Touching, Tasting; Exhortation; Father Patrick Conroy; Happy Mother's Day; A child on your doorstep; Vibrant Ministries Grant; From the heart of a young father; Love Gives Life; Roman Holiday; Smartphone; retirement
Fossil Hunting

 

April 15, 2018

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Easter Vigil; Angelica Village; Colorado woman; The art of anger; Cimarron Couple; Staats; Adoption; 

Father Ultan Murphy anniversary; Coughlan; Spiritual Advisor to Hoodlums; Woman of Courage; Oration contest; Darcy Feist  

 

April 1, 2018

 

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Defending Adoption; Led by the Spirit; Knights; ABC Pregnancy Center;
Memorial of Mary; Homeless; Relics; Down syndrome abortion; Chrism Mass

 

March 18, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: SKYAC; Aleksandr Men; Fasting for Priestly Vocations; Uganda; School for deaf; Rannah Evetts; Oberle; Rachel and Doug Trombley; Oscar Romero; Paul VI; DACA

 

 

March 4, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Fasting for priestly vocations; Father Juan; Fasting and prayer;
Quest Weekend 2018; DACA; With God, anything is possible; Homelessness in our communities; Rhubarb, Kansas;
What's the point of fasting; Rite of Election; same-sex couples

 

Feb. 18, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Catholic Schools Week; Rachel Doll; Ellinwood; Great Bend; Garden City; Ness City; Dodge City; Sister Rita Schwarzenberger; Nigeria; Bishop Hermes; Fasting for Priestly Vocations; World Day for Consecrated Life; 50th Anniversary St. Dominic School; What will life be like in 50 years?

 

 

Feb. 4, 2018

 

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: March for Life; Tracy and Ross Smith; Adoption; Vibrant Ministries; Faith and Light;
Pro-Life; Mortal sin to discard elderly; DACA; Abortion; Dreamers; Human Trafficking

 

Jan. 21, 2018

 KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Louise Korbe; Anne Frank; Miep Gies; Home Heat; Father Solanus

 

Jan. 7, 2018

KEYWORDS, PHRASES: Good news and kingdom living; dreamers; Sister Teresa Orozco; Infant Adoption; Elderly; a moral conundrum; seminarian; feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe

 

 

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